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Fabric paint

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  • PEGGY MATHEWS
    Hi, I m making a pair of the soft British style knapsacks for my file mate and myself, and wondered about the paint used on the outside. A friend just said to
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 5, 2001
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      Hi,

      I'm making a pair of the soft British style knapsacks for my file mate and myself, and wondered about the paint used on the outside. A friend just said to use fabric paint, but being a bit slow at times I could use some more specific advice. Brands, number of coats, etc. Any help is welcome.

      Michael

      "We must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it -- but we must sail, and not drift, nor lie at anchor." -- Oliver Wendell Holmes


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • James Aldrich
      ... Don t know if this helps, but the F&I 60th uses exterior latex house paint, one or two coats depending on conditions. I don t know what the authentic
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 5, 2001
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        PEGGY MATHEWS wrote:

        > Hi,
        >
        > I'm making a pair of the soft British style knapsacks for my file mate and myself, and wondered about the paint used on the outside.

        Don't know if this helps, but the F&I 60th uses exterior latex house paint, one or two coats depending on conditions. I don't know what the authentic alternative would be.

        JSA
        --
        Green Bay Lacrosse-- Play hard; play often.
      • petemonahan@aol.com
        Peggy I almost SURE it s not H.A., but when I did my soft pack (1812, colonial troops - no Trotter s for us!) I used good old Tremclad anti-rust paint. It
        Message 3 of 9 , Sep 5, 2001
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          Peggy

          I almost SURE it's not H.A., but when I did my soft pack (1812, colonial
          troops - no Trotter's for us!) I used good old "Tremclad" anti-rust paint.
          It goes on nice and thick and coats the weave (canvas duck in my case) in a
          manner I figure probably mimics whatever they used back then, which must have
          wax/tallow/oil in it for waterproofing. Also, perhaps surprisingly, it
          doesn't shine too much even new and weathers down nicely while keeping the
          pack quite dry - I drop mine on wet ground al the time and never worry about
          damp clothes. Hope this helps. "If they'd had it they would have used it."

          Peter Monahan, Corporal
          Royal N'fld Fencibles
        • easeufe@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/5/01 3:26:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Mike, This thread has surfaced before on the list and I believe that one of the suggestions was
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 5, 2001
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            In a message dated 9/5/01 3:26:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
            ciefranche21e@... writes:


            > Brands, number of coats, etc. Any help is welcome.
            >
            >

            Mike,

            This thread has surfaced before on the list and I believe that one of the
            suggestions was Rustoleum or any rustproofing paint. Check the archives.

            Ed Seufert, LCpl
            1812 Royal Marines
            1st Co/2nd Batt RM



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • easeufe@aol.com
            In a message dated 9/5/01 3:26:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Michael, I found this in my archives from Mr Lozon: Does anyone know what they used in 1812 to
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 5, 2001
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              In a message dated 9/5/01 3:26:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
              ciefranche21e@... writes:


              > Brands, number of coats, etc. Any help is welcome.
              >
              >

              Michael,

              I found this in my archives from Mr Lozon:

              "Does anyone know what they used in 1812 to paint canvas backpacks

              According to Ron Berlin who has been a professional painter for approximately
              fifty years and remembers his father making paint from scratch. The old
              paints were made with 'fish oil' as their base. In Canada and the United
              States the paint you buy to guard against rust is made with 'fish oil',
              as it penetrates the best. Rustoleum or Tremclad is the same as 1812 paint. I
              have been using it for years and it soaks into the canvas and makes it
              waterproof.
              If you want to touch it up after a few years of wear just apply a coat of
              'floor wax'.
              All authentic 1812 products."

              Should've checked here first before my previous reply.

              Ed Seufert, LCpl
              1812 Royal Marines
              1st Co/2nd Batt RM



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Larry Lozon
              From: If you want to touch it up after a few years of wear just apply a coat of floor wax . ......................... I was asked off list
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 6, 2001
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                From: <easeufe@...>

                If you want to touch it up after a few years
                of wear just apply a coat of 'floor wax'.
                .........................

                I was asked off list what I was talking about here

                SOOOOOOooooooooo

                I painted a haversack black using Tremclad (Canadian)
                Rustoleum (USA) paint. Then I sealed the two coats of paint
                with bees wax. I used a hair dryer to heat the surface then rubbed
                on bees wax. It took forever. I was then told by a knowledgeable
                re-enactor, use floor wax, it is already soft and dries hard. Every
                fall when I put away my kit I give my shoes a polish, and my
                haversack a coat of floor wax.

                One Step Further ..........

                I was also told to coat my bess with floor wax all over, barrel and
                stock when putting it away for the winter. It stops rust, protects
                from moisture, is not oily or greasy when stored away in a gun case
                and also the first shot melts the wax and you have bare metal.
                It also seals the stock. It also works on shakoes, a couple
                coats of black shoe polish (don't buff) then when dry, a coat or
                two of floor wax W_A_T_E_R P_R_O-O_F! what, what
              • giiir@yahoo.ca
                ... mate and myself, and wondered about the paint used on the outside. ... house paint, one or two coats depending on conditions I agree but would stress AT
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 6, 2001
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                  > > I'm making a pair of the soft British style knapsacks for my file
                  mate and myself, and wondered about the paint used on the outside.
                  >
                  > Don't know if this helps, but the F&I 60th uses exterior latex
                  house paint, one or two coats depending on conditions

                  I agree but would stress AT LEAST TWO COATS. It has been my job to
                  paint the Regimental Distinctions on our back-packs and I find that
                  unless they've had at least two coats, they tend to soak up
                  subsequent paint applications. In our case, the red comes out
                  distinctly brown unless the pack has had at least two coats. Also,
                  make sure you use matte paint, glossy enamel looks ridiculous.
                  Fred Fishell
                • John-Paul Johnson
                  Hi Peter, I got a copy of the Richard Feltoe s pattern for the soft pack from Michael Matthews. It looks not overly difficult to make but there are a couple
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 18, 2001
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                    Hi Peter,

                    I got a copy of the Richard Feltoe's pattern for the "soft pack" from
                    Michael Matthews. It looks not overly difficult to make but there are a
                    couple of parts where the pattern is a little ambiguous. I was
                    wondering if I could have a look at yours and maybe take a couple of
                    pictures before I start work on one.

                    CU L8R

                    J-P

                    petemonahan@... wrote:
                    >
                    > Peggy
                    >
                    > I almost SURE it's not H.A., but when I did my soft pack (1812, colonial
                    > troops - no Trotter's for us!) I used good old "Tremclad" anti-rust paint.
                    > It goes on nice and thick and coats the weave (canvas duck in my case) in a
                    > manner I figure probably mimics whatever they used back then, which must have
                    > wax/tallow/oil in it for waterproofing. Also, perhaps surprisingly, it
                    > doesn't shine too much even new and weathers down nicely while keeping the
                    > pack quite dry - I drop mine on wet ground al the time and never worry about
                    > damp clothes. Hope this helps. "If they'd had it they would have used it."
                    >
                    > Peter Monahan, Corporal
                    > Royal N'fld Fencibles
                    >
                    >
                    > The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
                    >
                    > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  • petemonahan@aol.com
                    JP Sure, no problem! (I didn t know Richard had a pattern!) I ll be at Penetang. Wednesday evening and at Willow Creek on Saturday. You bring the pattern,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Sep 18, 2001
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                      JP
                      Sure, no problem! (I didn't know Richard had a pattern!) I'll be at
                      Penetang. Wednesday evening and at Willow Creek on Saturday. You bring the
                      pattern, I'll bring the pack and we'll have a sewing bee!

                      Peter
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