Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [WarOf1812] questions...

Expand Messages
  • brookstne@aol.com
    To one and all....many thanks for your insights--yet again--(are you tired of my gratitude?) and help. I was pretty sure the captain s mast was a disciplinary
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 4, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      To one and all....many thanks for your insights--yet again--(are you tired of
      my gratitude?) and help. I was pretty sure the captain's mast was a
      disciplinary thing but wasn't sure it harkened back this far in time....I'm
      thrilled to know it was a positive thing as well....a tidbit worth
      squirreling away!

      I shall be pleased to let you know when the book comes out. At this point, my
      publisher is talking summer of next year, however, if I don't get off my duff
      and finish writing the darn thing, I hardly think I'll make that goal. I'm
      still stuck choosing the right ship for my hero (he doesn't have to
      command--he's a lieutenant--just serve). Any suggestions? I'm open for ideas!
      Meanwhile I'm writing all the "other" bits, until I can figure that out.

      Again...with all my admiration and appreciation....
      Sara
      PS....I have to say just one thing about the sugar information.... EW! ICK!
      (okay, that was two...) LOL...have a great one!
      <<
      From: "Dour Celt" <mcginley@...>
      Subject: Re: Re: Questions

      The term Captain's mast was common during the days of sail, both
      military and civilian. It recalled the practice of the captain
      standing at the mainmast meting out punishment and/or praise. It was
      the equivalent to what we call in modern times by the legal term
      non-judicial punishment. It was also a place for recognizing
      accomplishment.

      Arthur McGinley
      mcginley@...
    • james barnwell
      Sara; The book American Sailing Navy is by Howard Chapelle.It may be of help to you.Try Barnes and Noble. Good Luck! Jim Barnwell ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 4, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Sara;
        The book "American Sailing Navy is by Howard
        Chapelle.It may be of help to you.Try Barnes and
        Noble.
        Good Luck!
        Jim Barnwell
        --- brookstne@... wrote:
        > To one and all....many thanks for your insights--yet
        > again--(are you tired of
        > my gratitude?) and help. I was pretty sure the
        > captain's mast was a
        > disciplinary thing but wasn't sure it harkened back
        > this far in time....I'm
        > thrilled to know it was a positive thing as
        > well....a tidbit worth
        > squirreling away!
        >
        > I shall be pleased to let you know when the book
        > comes out. At this point, my
        > publisher is talking summer of next year, however,
        > if I don't get off my duff
        > and finish writing the darn thing, I hardly think
        > I'll make that goal. I'm
        > still stuck choosing the right ship for my hero (he
        > doesn't have to
        > command--he's a lieutenant--just serve). Any
        > suggestions? I'm open for ideas!
        > Meanwhile I'm writing all the "other" bits, until I
        > can figure that out.
        >
        > Again...with all my admiration and appreciation....
        > Sara
        > PS....I have to say just one thing about the sugar
        > information.... EW! ICK!
        > (okay, that was two...) LOL...have a great one!
        > <<
        > From: "Dour Celt" <mcginley@...>
        > Subject: Re: Re: Questions
        >
        > The term Captain's mast was common during the days
        > of sail, both
        > military and civilian. It recalled the practice of
        > the captain
        > standing at the mainmast meting out punishment
        > and/or praise. It was
        > the equivalent to what we call in modern times by
        > the legal term
        > non-judicial punishment. It was also a place for
        > recognizing
        > accomplishment.
        >
        > Arthur McGinley
        > mcginley@...
        >


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Get email alerts & NEW webcam video instant messaging with Yahoo! Messenger
        http://im.yahoo.com
      • james barnwell
        Sara; The book American Sailing Navy is by Howard Chapelle.It may be of help to you.Try Barnes and Noble. Good Luck! Jim Barnwell ...
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 4, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          Sara;
          The book "American Sailing Navy is by Howard
          Chapelle.It may be of help to you.Try Barnes and
          Noble.
          Good Luck!
          Jim Barnwell
          --- brookstne@... wrote:
          > To one and all....many thanks for your insights--yet
          > again--(are you tired of
          > my gratitude?) and help. I was pretty sure the
          > captain's mast was a
          > disciplinary thing but wasn't sure it harkened back
          > this far in time....I'm
          > thrilled to know it was a positive thing as
          > well....a tidbit worth
          > squirreling away!
          >
          > I shall be pleased to let you know when the book
          > comes out. At this point, my
          > publisher is talking summer of next year, however,
          > if I don't get off my duff
          > and finish writing the darn thing, I hardly think
          > I'll make that goal. I'm
          > still stuck choosing the right ship for my hero (he
          > doesn't have to
          > command--he's a lieutenant--just serve). Any
          > suggestions? I'm open for ideas!
          > Meanwhile I'm writing all the "other" bits, until I
          > can figure that out.
          >
          > Again...with all my admiration and appreciation....
          > Sara
          > PS....I have to say just one thing about the sugar
          > information.... EW! ICK!
          > (okay, that was two...) LOL...have a great one!
          > <<
          > From: "Dour Celt" <mcginley@...>
          > Subject: Re: Re: Questions
          >
          > The term Captain's mast was common during the days
          > of sail, both
          > military and civilian. It recalled the practice of
          > the captain
          > standing at the mainmast meting out punishment
          > and/or praise. It was
          > the equivalent to what we call in modern times by
          > the legal term
          > non-judicial punishment. It was also a place for
          > recognizing
          > accomplishment.
          >
          > Arthur McGinley
          > mcginley@...
          >


          __________________________________________________
          Do You Yahoo!?
          Get email alerts & NEW webcam video instant messaging with Yahoo! Messenger
          http://im.yahoo.com
        • easeufe@aol.com
          In a message dated 9/4/01 11:11:34 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Jim/Sara, The American Sailing Navy by Howard Chapelle is more concerned with the
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 4, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            In a message dated 9/4/01 11:11:34 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            barnlll@... writes:


            > The book "American Sailing Navy is by Howard
            > Chapelle.It may be of help to you.Try Barnes and
            >

            Jim/Sara,
            "The American Sailing Navy" by Howard Chapelle is more concerned with the
            construction of sailing vessels and covers the history of the United States
            Navy from the Revolutionary War to the 1850s. Very good on detail if you
            need to know the sail plan or draught or deck layout or spar dimensions etc.
            of any vessel but little history of the men who sailed them. The book
            contains over 200 plans and drawings.

            Stick to Brain Lavery's "Nelson's Navy" for details on how ship's were run.
            You may also try "The Illustrated Companion to Nalson's Navy" by Blake &
            Lawrence, an attempt to give more illustrations of what Lavery explains and
            less reading. (Some
            of the drawings though look like they were done by a 5 year old!)

            Ed Seufert, LCpl
            1812 Royal Marines
            1st Co/2nd Batt RM



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Roger Marsh
            ... (SNIP) You may also try The Illustrated Companion to Nalson s Navy by Blake & ... explains and ... (SNIP) These are probably the Mangin ones, are they?
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 4, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              --- In WarOf1812@y..., easeufe@a... wrote:
              (SNIP)> You may also try "The Illustrated Companion to Nalson's Navy"
              by Blake &
              > Lawrence, an attempt to give more illustrations of what Lavery
              explains and
              > less reading. (Some
              > of the drawings though look like they were done by a 5 year old!)
              (SNIP)

              These are probably the Mangin ones, are they? Executed by a naval
              parson; though an interesting record of life on board at first hand
              by one who had lived it, he was certainly no Nicholas Pocock, one
              must concur.
              Regards,

              Roger Marsh
            • easeufe@aol.com
              In a message dated 9/5/01 2:26:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Not really. The artist actually does his own rendition of others artwork. For example, the
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 5, 2001
              • 0 Attachment
                In a message dated 9/5/01 2:26:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
                frigates@... writes:


                >

                Not really. The artist actually does his own rendition of others artwork.
                For example, the Purser by Rowlandson can be found on page 102 of Lavery's
                'Nelson's Navy'. The artist drew his own version for the 'Illustrated
                Companion' and it's somewhat harder to make out the face and details.
                Actually titles it 'A Purser, after Rowlandson'. A lot of renditions are
                done, some good and some.....

                But there are a lot of diagrams, tables, other drawings and pictures. Nice
                to have.

                Ed Seufert, LCpl
                1812 Royal Marines
                1st Co/2nd Batt RM



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.