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Re: [WarOf1812] Bleed and Purge (Cobwebs)

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  • lee caripidis
    The use of sugar to lessen the risk of infection in open wounds predates the 16th century by far. I read somewhere that the ancient Egyptians used honey to
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 25 3:13 PM
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      The use of sugar to lessen the risk of infection in open wounds predates
      the 16th century by far. I read somewhere that the ancient Egyptians used
      honey to sterilize open wounds. Not so strange when one thinks about it.
      Candied fruit doesn't spoil, either.
      Lee Caripidis.
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      On Fri, 31 Aug 2001 19:59:25 -0400 "Richard Feltoe" <feltoe@...>
      writes:
      > Dear Craig
      > Don't knock the cobwebs as a medical tool, they were / are a
      > natural, biodegradable self-adhesive packing material, that would
      > assist in holding together the edges of a wound and assist in its
      > closure.
      >
      > Another unusual one (by today's standards) is sugar, packing an open
      > wound with sugar and then binding over the top seals the hole, helps
      > to sterilize the wound and prevent infection, promotes cell growth,
      > and reduces scaring. This technique has been known since the 16th
      > Century but "new" medicines have kept putting it into the old wives
      > tales category. The last time it was "rediscovered" in a wartime
      > situation was during the Spanish Civil War but when penicillin and
      > other sulpha drugs came into use it was relegated to obscurity once
      > again. That is until about ten years ago when emergency departments
      > found more and more people were not reacting well to penicillin to
      > combat infection in open wounds. They found instead that if they
      > used sugar, packed into the open wounds, it kept things from
      > becoming infected and could be simply flushed out with a little
      > sterile water.
      >
      > If anyone has an interest in some of these "old" medicines,remedies
      > and techniques, I would suggest having a talk with Karen Posner of
      > our group. She has done significant research on this topic and uses
      > it as part of our educational presentations to school classes.
      > Although she is not part of this list, any questions can be
      > forwarded on or off-list through me and I will see that the reply
      > comes back accordingly.
      >
      > Regards Richard Feltoe
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
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    • Craig Williams
      Actually Richard I was thinking that cobwebs aren t all that sterile, and as far as sugar is concerned, I read about a fellow who was wounded and while in
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2001
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        Actually Richard
        I was thinking that cobwebs aren't all that sterile, and as far as sugar is
        concerned, I read about a fellow who was wounded and while in hospital the
        guy in the bed next to him was given sugar treatment. This is not so odd
        considering your note except that the war was Vietnam
        circa1968!
        And now micro surgeons are using flint scalpels and leeches again!
        As the song says " everything old is new again"

        Craig
      • giiir@yahoo.ca
        ... predates ... Egyptians used ... about it. ... fought over the fate of hundreds ... of ... Having worked for breweries, albeit as an architect, I am aware
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 2, 2001
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          --- In WarOf1812@y..., lee caripidis <ditlegrec@j...> wrote:
          > The use of sugar to lessen the risk of infection in open wounds
          predates
          > the 16th century by far. I read somewhere that the ancient
          Egyptians used
          > honey to sterilize open wounds. Not so strange when one thinks
          about it.
          > Candied fruit doesn't spoil, either.
          > Lee Caripidis.
          fought over the fate of hundreds
          > > of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate
          of
          > > THOUSANDS of square miles...
          > >
          > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
          > > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

          Having worked for breweries, albeit as an architect, I am aware of
          the pains gone to in the daily cleandown of every part of the
          bottling lines to prevent bacterial contamination.(wild yeasts,etc.)
          Yet the bottlers of soft drinks never bother. It was explained to me
          that this is unnecessary as in the presence of the high sugar content
          of the soft drink syrups, no bacteria can survive. However I am not
          sure that this also applies to bacilli and viruses(or should that be
          viri?)
          Fred Fishell
          > >
          > >
          > >
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