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Re: Questions

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  • Roger Marsh
    Ed s message confirms Lavery s notes, in Nelson s Navy , on US naval practice. There was, of course, no possibility of admiral s rank, since the USA had no
    Message 1 of 29 , Sep 1, 2001
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      Ed's message confirms Lavery's notes, in "Nelson's Navy", on US naval
      practice.

      There was, of course, no possibility of admiral's rank, since the USA
      had no fleet, being a frigate and sloop navy; the firepower of the
      entire US navy would not have matched that of just one medium-sized
      European battlefleet at sea.

      The senior frigate captains promoted to Commodore, such as
      Bainbridge, Hull, Decatur, seem to have guarded the title jealously,
      however, since it was the highest rank they could achieve in the US
      Navy, even if in fact a temporary one. They could not become admirals
      with a permanent title as could their British, French, Spanish,
      Swedish, Dutch and so on, counterparts.

      Regards,

      Roger Marsh

      --- In WarOf1812@y..., Armchairadm@c... wrote:
      > Commodore is, in fact a temporary or honorary title / rank in the
      US Navy of
      > the War of 1812 period. It is applied to the senior officer
      commanding a
      > group of warships. It is true that many US naval officers
      continued to fly a
      > Commodore's Broad Pennant on a semi-permanent basis & insisted on
      being
      > addressed as Commodore, however there is no permanent rank above
      that of
      > Capt. in the US Navy prior to 1862.
      >
      > Ed Bolla
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Charlie McCulloh
      I ve been picking at these doubled over wool strips for three months whenever I get the chance. I ve been told that the fringe on our 4th Foot (Grenadier
      Message 2 of 29 , Jun 19, 2006
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        I've been picking at these doubled over wool strips for three months
        whenever I get the chance. I've been told that the fringe on our 4th
        Foot (Grenadier Company) shoulder epaulettes was made this way.

        Q:
        Is that correct?
        Q:
        Is there a simpler method than the laborious picking of single strands?
        Q:
        AND for God's sake, can you buy this pre-made of a correct
        construction and quality?

        Inquiring minds want to know.

        Charlie McCulloh
        4th Foot (The Kings Own)
        On the Gulf Coast
      • James Yaworsky
        ... Terminology clarification: only officers coats have epaulettes... ranker and NCO coats have shoulder straps . Line companies have shoulder straps with
        Message 3 of 29 , Jun 20, 2006
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          --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Charlie McCulloh"
          <moosenmoo35244@...> wrote:
          >
          > I've been picking at these doubled over wool strips for three months
          > whenever I get the chance. I've been told that the fringe on our 4th
          > Foot (Grenadier Company) shoulder epaulettes was made this way.
          >
          > Q:
          > Is that correct?
          > Q:
          > Is there a simpler method than the laborious picking of single strands?
          > Q:
          > AND for God's sake, can you buy this pre-made of a correct
          > construction and quality?
          >
          > Inquiring minds want to know.
          >
          > Charlie McCulloh
          > 4th Foot (The Kings Own)
          > On the Gulf Coast
          >

          Terminology clarification: only officers' coats have epaulettes...
          ranker and NCO coats have "shoulder straps".

          Line companies have shoulder straps with rather large tufts along
          their base (where the shoulder strap is sewn in to the top of the arm
          seam).

          Grenadier and Light Company coats generally don't have similar tufts.

          They have, instead, "wings", which are small pieces of fabric sewn in
          to the top of the arm seam that sort of hang down a few inches over
          the sleeve. These "wings" are edged in regimental lace, with 6
          "darts" of regimental lace spaced evenly but at an angle across their
          width from the seam to the bottom edge of the wing (the part closest
          to the ground when you wear the coat).

          Some wings have, in addition to regimental lace edging their bottom, a
          "fringe" of strands of wool. This strand seems to vary in its size
          from unit to unit - in some cases, it seems almost as dense as the
          line company shoulder tuft, in other cases, it looks rather minimal.

          The logical person(s) to help out on this inquiry (assuming I have
          understood and laid it out properly above) would be members of
          grenadier companies (and/or maybe light companies) who have some
          experience of putting tuft edging on their wings. How about it, guys?
          What's the story? This inquiring mind also wants to know.


          Jim Yaworsky
          Line Company, 41st - "No expert in grenadier or light company wing
          fringes."
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