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Taking Rifled Flintlocks to the UK

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  • Roger Fuller
    A while back I wrote the List and asked what requirements one must fulfill in order to take a rifled flintlock to the UK for purposes of reenactment. Well,
    Message 1 of 3 , May 4, 1999
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      A while back I wrote the List and asked what requirements one must fulfill
      in order to take a rifled flintlock to the UK for purposes of reenactment.

      Well, I've since found out, and for anyone's edification, here they are, so
      far.

      First, one must have a darned good reason to bring it over (reenactments
      qualify; I've been invited to be with the UK 1/95th at a living history
      event in August 1999). You also need a sponsor who is a UK resident (don't
      know whether they have to be UK citizens). Then, the applicant and his or
      her sponsor must get and fill out the correct application forms, namely the
      "Application for a Visitor's Firearm/Shot Gun Permit"(Firearms Form 107),
      and the "Application For Grant of an Explosives Certificate To Those
      Resident Outside The United Kingdom" (COER/2).

      Both forms are good for individuals as well as groups. You must spell out in
      the forms exactly when, where and for what purpose you plan to use the
      rifled flintlock. They also ask if you plan to bring explosives with you. I
      don't plan to, and I seriously doubt the US Govt. will let anybody take any
      on the plane, even in the checked luggage. They also ask if you plan to buy
      any firearms or shotguns, acc. to their definitions, while in the UK, but
      I'd probably need some kind of export licence.

      The police officer, who is helping my sponsor (my sister-in-law, who is from
      Winchester, Hants) with the application, strongly recommended the latter
      form, at the very least because it's one of the few things that are granted
      free by the UK Police! :^)
      (The first application, BTW, costs twelve pounds.)

      I also had to send in DETAILED info and a pic of the Baker repro, which is
      rifled and therefore falls in with all rifles, old and new, in the UK's
      Firearms classification. (The UK groups use the smoothbore varieties of
      Baker repros, which come under the heading of Shotguns, which are pretty
      much COMPARATIVELY exempt from the paperwork that mine entails.)

      In fact, the officer seemed to hint to my sister-in-law that the info was
      TOO detailed; she seemed to think that they might have given it a pass and
      just figured it was an antique or a Baker smoothbore copy, _but_ I would NOT
      recommend to anyone to try to bring in a rifled flintlock as a smoothbore,
      and take the chance that the Old Bill will just say, "Right, a flintlock-
      who cares?".
      Serious consequences _will_ result. ALWAYS follow the laws and be up front
      and unequivocally honest about all your gear and intentions.

      And - apply many months in advance.

      I am filling the forms out as we speak, and I'll keep the list posted about
      the progress.

      Roger Fuller
      3/95th Foot (Rifles)
    • mmathews@xxxx.xxxxxx.xxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxx
      ... Thanks, I ll save this for future reference in case I ever get a Baker. (I can dream can t I?) But since one of the Waterloo options next year is to go
      Message 2 of 3 , May 4, 1999
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        >From: "Roger Fuller" <fullerfamily@...>
        >
        >A while back I wrote the List and asked what requirements one must fulfill
        >in order to take a rifled flintlock to the UK for purposes of reenactment.
        >
        >Well, I've since found out, and for anyone's edification, here they are, so
        >far.

        Thanks, I'll save this for future reference in case I ever get a Baker. (I
        can dream can't I?) But since one of the Waterloo options next year is to
        go over to England early and knock about at bit, what is entailed with
        getting a smoothbore across? Anyone? Last time I went I just requested a
        loaner from the regimental depot and avoided the hassles. Except for the
        hassles of trying to shoot with a frizzen so soft it could be used to clean
        up spills. But I digress.

        I'd really rather take my own next year, and if we take the England first
        option would like to know what's involved. In '95 as an aside we went into
        Paris, where no one was even interested in looking at my gun. Going out
        they x-rayed the gun box and saw the bayonet. "What eez thess? Sompting
        for spearing feesh?" I was asked. I started to answer it was for spearing
        men, but thought better of it. "Mais oui, poisson!"

        Michael


        Michael Mathews -- Winona State University
        Voice: (507) 285-7585 Fax: (507) 280-5568
        ------------------------------
        "Wit is educated insolence." -- Aristotle (384-322 B.C.)
      • Roger Fuller
        Good story, Michael! BTW the same forms I mentioned in my previous post also have check-offs for smoothbores as well; additionally, smoothbores with a barrel
        Message 3 of 3 , May 4, 1999
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          Good story, Michael!

          BTW the same forms I mentioned in my previous post also have check-offs for
          smoothbores as well; additionally, smoothbores with a barrel length of less
          than twenty-four inches and a bore greater than two inches (!) fall under a
          firearm, and not a shotgun, classification. Firearms do receive greater
          scrutiny than smoothbores from the police, though.


          >From: mmathews@... (Michael Mathews)
          >
          >>From: "Roger Fuller" <fullerfamily@...>
          >>
          >>A while back I wrote the List and asked what requirements one must fulfill
          >>in order to take a rifled flintlock to the UK for purposes of reenactment.
          >>
          >>Well, I've since found out, and for anyone's edification, here they are,
          so
          >>far.
          >
          >Thanks, I'll save this for future reference in case I ever get a Baker. (I
          >can dream can't I?)

          Well, as handmade firearms go, they are pretty cheap. Most handmade fowlers
          and rifles run about US$ 2500-4000. The Rifle Shoppe Baker's a measly $1400.
          (Yeah, measly, right.. :^) I'm not rich either- I'm wondering how I'm going
          to afford the drive to Toronto May 21-23...).

          We've explored the option of getting cheap Indian-made bakers, as they use
          in the UK and Australia, and the paperwork is endless. By the time they
          arrive, one could have earned the money for an RS Baker.

          But since one of the Waterloo options next year is to
          >go over to England early and knock about at bit, what is entailed with
          >getting a smoothbore across

          >Michael
          >
          So, in short, I go through the same thing everybody else _legally_ is
          supposed to do when going to the UK with muskets and rifles. No big deal, it
          seems, but do get the paperwork in way ahead of time, and fill it out right-
          who needs hassles because the "i"s weren't dotted properly.

          Roger Fuller
          3/95th
          >
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