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Re: Targets

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  • R Henderson
    Hi Betsy! I do not know if you have any descriptions of targets being used by US forces, but I did come across one for the British. For those interested in
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 28, 1999
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      Hi Betsy!

      I do not know if you have any descriptions of targets being used by US forces, but I did come across one for the British. For those interested in live firing here is a
      target used by the 85th Regiment in 1812:

      "The description of target to be invariably used will be the screen or figure target; to be made of canvass, stretched on a wooden frame. seven feet in height, and three
      feet in breadth, supported in the rear by a small prop, similar to a gravel sifter, only perpendicular; a figure will be marked on it, with arms folded across the breast,
      in the position of ordered arms, but never exceeding 6 feet in height, and 22 inches in breadth; the space between the extreme points, as head, feet, and shoulders, and
      the edge of the canvass, being shoulders, and the edge of the canvass, being equally divided. The colour of the figure and of the ground-work will be always different,
      but may be occasionally varied. In the exact centre of the body will be described a circle or ring of two inches diameter, surrounded by another circle of eight inches
      diameter."

      A wooden figure was kept by the Quarter Master to be used to traced from onto the canvas. The ranges practiced were 60, 100, 150 and 200 yards.

      I have some accounts of targets being used by the British in the 1830s and 40s were they really got fancy. Hope you find this interesting.

      Robert

      Betsy Bashore wrote:

      > From: Betsy Bashore <bjb_remote@...>
      >
      > US troops were told to "TAKE AIM". In the Northwest, when relieved from guard
      > duty, soldiers were required to discharge their muskets at a target to improve
      > their aim. the closest to the centre mark was rewarded with an extra gill of
      > whiskey. Whether US troops, in general, were better marksmen for this, I have
      > no idea.
      >
      > Betsy
      >

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