Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [WarOf1812] The Letter "J" in the alphabet

Expand Messages
  • dancingbobd@webtv.net
    Hi everyone, I own an butcher knife made in Shefield in the period 1800-1840 by John Wilson Co. It is marked I WILSON. He made knives from the 3rd qtr of the
    Message 1 of 12 , Jun 4, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi everyone,

      I own an butcher knife made in Shefield in the period 1800-1840 by John
      Wilson Co. It is marked I WILSON. He made knives from the 3rd qtr of
      the 18th Cen. well into the 20th Cen. I imagine that he did not want to
      change his "brand" name which was known for high quality. Prior to 1800
      Wilson marked his knives with a touch mark of a pepper corn and a
      diamond. The name was added at the start of the 19th Cen. The
      documentation for this came from the Museum of the Fur Trade Quarterly.

      I also have a 1763 set of Engineer manuals published in Britain which
      uses j as we would today. Things were not as uniform as they are today
      in usage and spelling.

      Regards,

      Bob Dorian
      US Engineers
    • Angela Gottfred
      There is definitely _something_ odd about the way i & j were viewed in the early 19C. My c.1806 edition of Johnson s dictionary considers i and j to be
      Message 2 of 12 , Jun 5, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        There is definitely _something_ odd about the way "i" & "j" were viewed in
        the early 19C. My c.1806 edition of Johnson's dictionary considers 'i' and
        'j' to be the same letter, alphabetizing 'jay' and 'jazel' before 'ibis'.
        'Ibis' to 'idyl' are followed by 'jealous' to 'jezebel'. 'Jezebel' is
        followed by 'if' and so on. I wonder if this is some academic affectation
        that comes from the fact that there is no 'j' in Latin.

        Your humble & obedient servant,
        Angela Gottfred
      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        In a message dated 6/5/2001 9:19:13 AM Central Daylight Time, agottfre@telusplanet.net writes:
        Message 3 of 12 , Jun 5, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 6/5/2001 9:19:13 AM Central Daylight Time,
          agottfre@... writes:

          << I wonder if this is some academic affectation
          that comes from the fact that there is no 'j' in Latin. >>

          I think you could well be right Angela, that is was considered the same
          letter even though it is written differently and pronounced differently!
          Of course this affectation does not affect the usage in everyday written
          language one jot.

          Cheers

          Tim
        • James Aldrich
          ... Considering earlier efforts to impose Latin grammar on English, I suspect you are not far from the truth of the matter. JSA -- Green Bay Lacrosse-- Play
          Message 4 of 12 , Jun 5, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            Angela Gottfred wrote:

            > I wonder if this is some academic affectation
            > that comes from the fact that there is no 'j' in Latin.

            Considering earlier efforts to impose Latin grammar on English, I suspect you are not far from the truth of the matter.

            JSA

            --
            Green Bay Lacrosse-- Play hard; play often.
          • Craig Williams
            Scott I am doing the film Salem Witch Trials right now, which occurred in 1692 and they definitely used the letter J . one of the poor bastards hung was
            Message 5 of 12 , Jun 12, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              Scott
              I am doing the film "Salem Witch Trials" right now, which occurred in 1692
              and they definitely used the letter "J". one of the poor bastards hung was
              John Proctor.

              Craig
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Scott Jeznach <scottj@...>
              To: WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com <WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Monday, June 04, 2001 2:55 PM
              Subject: [WarOf1812] The Letter "J" in the alphabet


              >Got a weird question for the group.
              >
              >In the mid to late 18th century, the letter "J" was not used in the English
              >alphabet. The letter "I" was used for both "I" and "J."
              >
              >Was the letter "J" in use by our period (ie: the early 19th Century)?
              >
              >Scott J.
              >Royal Marines
              >
              >
              >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of hundreds of
              square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the fate of THOUSANDS of
              square miles...
              >
              >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
            • Roger Marsh
              Ah - it was Scott Jeznach, then. Kindly elucidate, Scott. Regards, Roger Marsh ... ? ... hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined
              Message 6 of 12 , Jun 13, 2001
              • 0 Attachment
                Ah - it was Scott Jeznach, then. Kindly elucidate, Scott.

                Regards,

                Roger Marsh

                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Scott Jeznach <scottj@c...>
                > Subject: [WarOf1812] The Letter "J" in the alphabet
                >
                <SNIP>?

                > >The War of 1812: In Europe, thousands fought over the fate of
                hundreds of square miles: in North America, hundreds determined the
                fate of THOUSANDS of square miles...
                > >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.