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Sashes

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  • John-Paul Johnson
    The Flash of the Crimson Sash by Buzz Bourdon (The Maple Leaf Vol IV Issue 16) The crimson sash of infantry senior non-commissioned members is one of the most
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 3, 2001
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      The Flash of the Crimson Sash by Buzz Bourdon (The Maple Leaf Vol IV
      Issue 16)

      The crimson sash of infantry senior non-commissioned members is one of
      the most distinctive accoutrements worn in the CF. Draped with pride
      over the right shoulder, the sash illustrates both the wearer's rank and
      military trade. (In keeping with their tradition of wearing dark
      accoutrements, senior NCMs of rifle regiments do not wear sashes.)
      Infantry sergeants wear sashes made from crimson worsted, while the
      sashes of infantry warrant officers, master warrant officers and chief
      warrant officers are manufactured from silk.

      Sashes were first worn during the 17th century by both officers and
      senior NCMs of the British army to indicate rank and to carry casualties
      off the battlefield. To that end, sashes were manufactured of silk for
      strength. They were also voluminous enough to enclose the human body. In
      some regiments, even the privates wore sashes.

      During this era, soldiers wore their sashes as they pleased, either
      around the waist or over the shoulder. Some officers preferred sashes
      made of gold or silver net work, while some preferred plain crimson
      silk. Eventually, only general officers were permitted sashes made with
      gold and silver.

      By 1747 a British army clothing regulation directed that infantry
      officers would wear their sashes over the right shoulder and cavalry
      officers would wear them over the left. The senior NCMs of both arms
      would wear the sash around the waist.

      Infantry senior NCM sashes also featured a thin stripe running down its
      centre in the regiment's facing colour, which was also seen on the
      collars and cuffs of the unit's tunic. This facing colour on sashes
      disappeared by the middle of the 19th century.

      By the beginning of the 20th century, officers wore their sashes around
      their waists with the bow hanging down on the left, which is still done.
      Today, infantry senior NCMs wear their sashes mainly for regimental
      duties such as parades and duty NCM, according to CWO D. R. Bradley of
      Ottawa's
      Ceremonial Guard.

      >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
      J-P Johnson
      Royal Nfld Reg't
      --------------
      J-P's Homepage: http://members.home.net/jpjohnsn/

      Battle of Georgian Bay Website: http://www.battleofgeorgianbay.huronia.com/
    • Mike Jansen
      Is there anyone out there who has the instructions for the proper tying of the sergeant s sash? Cheers! Mike Jansen 1st Lincoln Militia
      Message 2 of 2 , May 26, 2009
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        Is there anyone out there who has the instructions for the proper tying of the sergeant's sash?
        Cheers!
        Mike Jansen
        1st Lincoln Militia
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