Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [WarOf1812] Last battle.

Expand Messages
  • Maxine Trottier
    Yes; they were still fighting here and a treaty had been signed in Europe. Max [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 16 , May 6, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Yes; they were still fighting here and a treaty had been signed in Europe.

      Max


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • TheGoldenAge72@aol.com
      Thank you, Max. Sincerely, Darren Freeman. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 16 , May 6, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        Thank you, Max.

        Sincerely,
        Darren Freeman.


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • BritcomHMP@aol.com
        In a message dated 5/6/2001 2:57:08 PM Central Daylight Time, TheGoldenAge72@aol.com writes:
        Message 3 of 16 , May 6, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          In a message dated 5/6/2001 2:57:08 PM Central Daylight Time,
          TheGoldenAge72@... writes:

          << I am not sure about this. Before the peace treaty was signed, there was
          one
          last battle. The Battle of New Orleans, right? I cannot remember that. I
          know
          it was led by Andrew Jackson. >>

          Actually the last battle was the capture of Fort Bowyer, Mobile Bay, 10th of
          February 1815. A British victory.

          Cheers

          Tim
        • BritcomHMP@aol.com
          In a message dated 5/6/2001 3:10:17 PM Central Daylight Time, maxitrot@execulink.com writes:
          Message 4 of 16 , May 6, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            In a message dated 5/6/2001 3:10:17 PM Central Daylight Time,
            maxitrot@... writes:

            << Yes; they were still fighting here and a treaty had been signed in Europe.
            >>

            But not ratified! The peace treaty did nor arrive in Washington for US
            ratification until 14th of February 1815. President Madison declared the war
            at an end on February 17th.

            The upshot of this is that the war was NOT over when the Battle of New
            Orleans was fought.

            Cheers

            Tim
          • TheGoldenAge72@aol.com
            Tim, thank you. Do you know if the battle had a name? Sincerely, Darren Freeman. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 16 , May 6, 2001
            • 0 Attachment
              Tim, thank you. Do you know if the battle had a name?

              Sincerely,
              Darren Freeman.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • spikeyj@crosslink.net
              ... Last land battle; naval engagements were still being fought around the world months later as word of peace slowly propagated. Spike Y Jones
              Message 6 of 16 , May 6, 2001
              • 0 Attachment
                On Sun, 6 May 2001 BritcomHMP@... wrote:

                > << I am not sure about this. Before the peace treaty was signed, there was
                > one
                > last battle. The Battle of New Orleans, right? I cannot remember that. I
                > know
                > it was led by Andrew Jackson. >>
                >
                > Actually the last battle was the capture of Fort Bowyer, Mobile Bay, 10th of
                > February 1815. A British victory.

                Last land battle; naval engagements were still being fought around the
                world months later as word of peace slowly propagated.

                Spike Y Jones
              • Armchairadm@cs.com
                It should be notted that due to the slow pace of communications, there were a number of naval action after the official close of hostilities. Among them;
                Message 7 of 16 , May 7, 2001
                • 0 Attachment
                  It should be notted that due to the slow pace of communications, there were a
                  number of naval action after the official close of hostilities.
                  Among them; "Constitution's" victory over the "Cyane" and "Lavant" on
                  February 20th, 1815 and the "Peacock's" capture of the HEIC armed brig
                  "Nautilus" on the 1st of July, 1815.

                  Ed


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • HQ93rd@aol.com
                  TheGoldenAge72@aol.com Actually the last battle was the
                  Message 8 of 16 , May 7, 2001
                  • 0 Attachment
                    TheGoldenAge72@...<< I am not sure about this. Before the peace treaty
                    was signed, there was
                    > one
                    > last battle. The Battle of New Orleans, right? I cannot remember that. I
                    > know
                    > it was led by Andrew Jackson. >>

                    Britcomhmp@...> Actually the last battle was the capture of Fort Bowyer,
                    Mobile Bay, 10th of
                    > February 1815. A British victory.

                    spikeyj@...>>Last land battle; naval engagements were still being
                    fought around the
                    world months later as word of peace slowly propagated. >>

                    I also recall reading recently (and cannot find it for the life of me) that
                    were also several small engagements as well as landings and raids after the
                    date of the capture of Ft Bowyer, along the Georgia (?) coast and perhaps
                    elsewhere on the East coast.

                    B
                  • HQ93rd@aol.com
                    In a message dated 5/6/01 12:57:03 PM, TheGoldenAge72@aol.com writes:
                    Message 9 of 16 , May 7, 2001
                    • 0 Attachment
                      In a message dated 5/6/01 12:57:03 PM, TheGoldenAge72@... writes:

                      << I am not sure about this. Before the peace treaty was signed, there was
                      one
                      last battle. The Battle of New Orleans, right? I cannot remember that. I know
                      it was led by Andrew Jackson. >>

                      The Treaty of Ghent was signed Dec. 24th, 1814. The "battle" (actually a
                      campaign) of New Orleans took place about from Dec 23, 1814 through January
                      19, 1815 (the day when the Brits had completely withdrawn back to the ships).
                      Several major actions occurred during that time, with the most famous being
                      the last failed assault by the Brits on Jan 8.
                      The Treaty was not valid until it had been ratified by both Parliament and
                      the US Congress. Because of the longer time involved back then of sea travel
                      and sending news, the US would not ratify it until Feb. 17 (if I recall that
                      date right, off hand).
                      The Brit force that attacked New Orleans and captured Ft Bowyer received news
                      of the Treaty about the same time as it was finally being ratified in
                      Coingress.

                      B
                      93rd SHRoFLHU
                      www.93rdhighlanders.com
                      THE Thin Red LIne
                    • easeufe@aol.com
                      In a message dated 5/7/01 5:29:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time, HQ93rd@aol.com ... Cumberland Island on the coast of Georgia was occupied on 10 January 1815. On 12
                      Message 10 of 16 , May 7, 2001
                      • 0 Attachment
                        In a message dated 5/7/01 5:29:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time, HQ93rd@...
                        writes:


                        > were also several small engagements as well as landings and raids after the
                        > date of the capture of Ft Bowyer, along the Georgia (?) coast and perhaps
                        > elsewhere on the East coast.
                        >
                        >

                        Cumberland Island on the coast of Georgia was occupied on 10 January 1815.
                        On 12 January, a fort located at Point Pitre (Petre) was attacked and taken.
                        Later that night, the town of St. Mary's was also taken. By 24 January, all
                        forces had returned to Cumberland Island and proceeded to fortify it. Except
                        for small excursions up the various rivers in the area, no major actions took
                        place. On 10 March, having been notified that the peace treaty was ratified,
                        the troops emabarked for Bermuda. Units involved in this operation were the
                        1st, 2nd and 3rd Battalions, Royal Marines; Royal Marine Artillery; 2nd West
                        India Regiment and Royal West India Rangers.

                        Ed Seufert, LCpl
                        1812 Royal Marines


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Roger Marsh
                        Just a word to introduce myself, as requested by the Owner. I am an 18thC-early 19thC Naval History enthusiast, a frigate man at heart (think I must have been
                        Message 11 of 16 , May 8, 2001
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Just a word to introduce myself, as requested by the Owner.

                          I am an 18thC-early 19thC Naval History enthusiast, a frigate man at
                          heart (think I must have been an RN Post Captain in a previous
                          incarnation!), which is why the 1812 war is, evidently, of
                          considerable interest, the naval war having been almost entirely as a
                          frigate and sloop war, a comparitively minor Naval war as it was,
                          fought primarily between small naval forces and vessels on both sides.

                          I live in Hampshire, England the Naval county par excellence; though
                          not a dedicated re-enactor, I do put on uniform from time to time for
                          the International Festivals of The Sea, great maritime festivals, the
                          next of which is in Portsmouth Historic Naval Base this coming August
                          (see website at http://www.festivalofthesea.co.uk/

                          I am campaigning to get a British replica frigate built - well, not a
                          true frigate, too small, but a proper little quarter-decked ship-
                          rigged mini-frigate, probably "Atalanta" (14, later 16) of 1775-1801,
                          which took an active part in the earlier American war and, indeed,
                          spent a year in American hands, having fought but surrendered to
                          superior force, before being retaken. In the meantime, I have to
                          content myself with sailing working models, the latest project
                          being "Lowestoffe" of 1761-1801, built to 1:48 from Slade's original
                          1760 drafts (young Nelson's first appointment as a 17-year-old
                          Lieutenant, 2nd, in 1777 under Wm. Locker, on the West Indies
                          station; I shall portay her as at 10.00 am, by Locker's log, on 1st
                          November 1777, in the act of taking a smaller American privateer in
                          windy conditions off Cape Maize, at that moment "firing a Swivel,
                          Shott'd, to Bring the Chace too").

                          I know less about the land campaigns, and hope to learn more here. I
                          look forward to reading y'all

                          Regards,

                          Roger Marsh
                          Hampshire, England
                        • Maxine Trottier
                          Greetings, sir. It is a pleasure to see the nautical contingent slowly increasing here. Max Max Maxine Trottier maxitrot@execulink.com
                          Message 12 of 16 , May 8, 2001
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Greetings, sir. It is a pleasure to see the nautical contingent slowly increasing
                            here.

                            Max

                            Max

                            Maxine Trottier
                            maxitrot@...
                            http://www.execulink.com/~maxitrot/maxine.htm

                            ----------
                            Powered by Execulink WebMail - WeConnect!
                            http://www.execulink.com
                          • Roger Marsh
                            Why, thank you, Ma am. I look forward to the Honour and pleasure of the Company of all of you and remain, believe me, Ma ams and Sirs, your most Humble and
                            Message 13 of 16 , May 8, 2001
                            • 0 Attachment
                              Why, thank you, Ma'am.

                              I look forward to the Honour and pleasure of the Company of all of
                              you and remain, believe me, Ma'ams and Sirs, your most Humble and
                              Obd't Servant

                              Roger Marsh

                              --- In WarOf1812@y..., "Maxine Trottier" <maxitrot@e...> wrote:
                              > Greetings, sir. It is a pleasure to see the nautical contingent
                              slowly increasing
                              > here.
                              >
                              > Max
                              >
                              > Max
                              >
                              > Maxine Trottier
                              > maxitrot@e...
                              > http://www.execulink.com/~maxitrot/maxine.htm
                              >
                              > ----------
                              > Powered by Execulink WebMail - WeConnect!
                              > http://www.execulink.com
                            • Robb Jackson
                              ... at heart (think I must have been an RN Post Captain in a previous ... a frigate and sloop war, a comparitively minor Naval war as it was, ... sides. ...
                              Message 14 of 16 , May 8, 2001
                              • 0 Attachment
                                --- In WarOf1812@y..., "Roger Marsh" <frigates@m...> wrote:
                                > Just a word to introduce myself, as requested by the Owner.
                                >
                                > I am an 18thC-early 19thC Naval History enthusiast, a frigate man
                                at heart (think I must have been an RN Post Captain in a previous
                                > incarnation!), which is why the 1812 war is, evidently, of
                                > considerable interest, the naval war having been almost entirely as
                                a frigate and sloop war, a comparitively minor Naval war as it was,
                                > fought primarily between small naval forces and vessels on both
                                sides.
                                >
                                <SNIP>
                                > I am campaigning to get a British replica frigate built - well, not
                                a true frigate, too small, but a proper little quarter-decked ship-
                                > rigged mini-frigate, probably "Atalanta" (14, later 16) of 1775-
                                1801, > which took an active part in the earlier American war and,
                                indeed,> spent a year in American hands, having fought but
                                surrendered to superior force, before being retaken. In the meantime,
                                I have to content myself with sailing working models
                                <SNIP>
                                > I know less about the land campaigns, and hope to learn more here.
                                I look forward to reading y'all
                                >
                                > Regards,
                                >
                                > Roger Marsh
                                > Hampshire, England

                                Greetings Roger,

                                I thought this would be of interest to you as well as the rest of the
                                group. An actual ship being built for 1812 living history.

                                http://www.privateerlynx.org/living.htm

                                Robb Jackson
                                Marine Guard 1812
                              • Roger Marsh
                                Very interesting, Robb, thanks for that one to add to my collection of historic replicas at sea or in build; a nice little topsail schooner, somewhat
                                Message 15 of 16 , May 8, 2001
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Very interesting, Robb, thanks for that one to add to my collection
                                  of historic replicas at sea or in build; a nice little topsail
                                  schooner, somewhat reminiscent of the lovely "Pride of Baltimore" or
                                  the superb French "La Recouvrance".

                                  Well, Sir, if I ever get "Atalanta" to sea, I shall have to fire a
                                  Bow-Chaser, shott'd, to Bring her Too, if I can catch her!

                                  You may be interested in another 1812 privateer on which I have in
                                  fact sailed, this one a French cutter, the Malouin "Le Renard";
                                  details at the site of L'Association du Cotre Corsaire,

                                  http://www.saint-malo-gallery.com/cotre/

                                  I had the pleasure of helming her back into St-Malo last August, at
                                  the tiller with all square canvas set as we ran into the harbour at
                                  sunset, loosing off a shot from one of the larboard carronades as we
                                  passed the old fort, by way of a signal. Magic.

                                  Regards,

                                  Roger Marsh


                                  --- In WarOf1812@y..., "Robb Jackson" <robbjackson@m...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > Greetings Roger,
                                  >
                                  > I thought this would be of interest to you as well as the rest of
                                  the
                                  > group. An actual ship being built for 1812 living history.
                                  >
                                  > http://www.privateerlynx.org/living.htm
                                  >
                                  > Robb Jackson
                                  > Marine Guard 1812
                                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.