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8990Re: Officers from the ranks....

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  • Col Sjt Jones
    Jan 2, 2001
      Further to the hopefully humorous remarks I made at the bottom of
      this, I would like to re-emphasize that the voice of command training
      to which I referred was for junior officers. It wasn't intended to
      be elegant or to resemble singing - simply the ability to be heard
      and not to lose one's voice. Doug



      --- In WarOf1812@egroups.com, "Col Sjt Jones" <chimera1@s...> wrote:
      > --- In WarOf1812@egroups.com, BritcomHMP@a... wrote:
      > > In a message dated 1/1/2001 4:40:16 PM Central Standard Time,
      > HQ93rd@a...
      > > writes:
      > >
      > > << Perhaps the people who will be running the officer/NCO courses
      > could
      > > include training in enunciating from the diaphragm rather than
      the
      > > throat, so that a commander's voice is not lost to a hoarse
      gargle
      > > half way through a battle. >>
      > >
      > > Amen to that!
      > > >>
      > >
      > > Yes, its called singing! A (long) while ago there was a programe
      > about the
      > > preparations for Trooping the Colour for the Queens Birthday
      > Parade. It was
      > > pointed out that the Brigade Major (the chap who sits on his
      horse
      > shouting
      > > out all the orders) go 6 months of singing lessons to teach him
      how
      > to
      > > project from the diaphragm and not wreck his throat in a few
      > minuets.
      > > I can also just remember when all the regiments of Foot Guards
      had
      > slightly
      > > different notes to the orders so that, if more than one unit was
      on
      > parade at
      > > the same time, it was obvious which officer was giving the orders.
      > >
      > > Cheers
      > >
      > > Tim
      >
      > In my early days as commanding sjt of the Imuc I was apparently
      known
      > as the "singing serjeant". I suppose both for my elevated voice of
      > command and the fact that my commands were usually attenuated in
      > modern fashion - and that my singing voice is high. Doug
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