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31588Re: [War Of 1812] Notification of Families of British War Casualties

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  • Ray Hobbs
    Mar 7, 2007
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      Tom:
      Levels of literacy had been improving since 1803. That was the year in
      which Regimental Schools were established for the army, and the
      "Asylum" was established for the education of children of Regiments.
      Sponsor of this move was dear old Prinny.

      In Canada I know that the Royal Newfs had a well-stocked library in the
      period of the war, and that the Chaplain General, The Rev. John Owen,
      developed a system of book distribution among regimental hospitals -
      this to counteract the distribution of religious tracts by Methodists
      and Baptists.

      In the Peninsula (Iberian, that is), there reports of extensive
      education for Regimental children, which kept "the ragamuffins" off the
      streets - this was in 1809.

      This was also a time for educational reform in England, and
      establishment of many schools using Dr. Bell's methods, which the Army
      adopted.

      So, another item for some detailed research. I have a lot of this
      information on file. The implications of the facts thus far is that
      literacy was a growing skill, even in the army.

      My two cents' worth
      Ray H
      XLI




      On 7-Mar-07, at 4:23 PM, Tom Fournier wrote:

      > Good question!
      >
      > The returns I saw, could give no indication of that.
      >
      > Given the limited level of literacy, you wonder if there were many
      > if any wills.
      >
      > <snip>Tom:

      >
      > Tom
      >
      > >
      > > Do you think, Tom, that most of the time when a will was filled
      > out
      > > for a wife, it was one of these women on the strength of the
      > Regiment?
      > >
      > > Chris
      > >
      > > --- In WarOf1812@yahoogroups.com, "Tom Fournier"
      > > <tom4141fournier@> wrote:
      > > > Another interesting note; from an inspection return from October
      > > > 1811, the establishment of the 41st was listed as 760 men.
      > There
      > > is
      > > > also a notation indicating that there was 98 "legally" married
      > > women
      > > > and 253 children.
      > > >
      > > > Tom
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > > A question that would require a lot of digging is how many of
      > the
      > > > men
      > > > > with wills listed wives as the next of kin? Tom mentioned
      > > brother
      > > > > soldiers first. It would seem (in the 41st at this time, at
      > > > least)
      > > > > that it was rare to list a wife on a will - perhaps for this
      > > exact
      > > > > reason.
      > > > >
      > > > > Chris
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >

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