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Re: [WRTR-Teachers] Re:practice of word list

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  • Jammie Payne
    The kids love to use the magic boards. Just remember to duct tape the top shut or you will have a HUGE mess. Ask me how I know. ;-) I usually use cheap
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 9, 2008
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      The kids love to use the "magic boards." Just remember to duct tape the top shut or you will have a HUGE mess. Ask me how I know. ;-) I usually use cheap hair gel inside a gallon ziplock bag with a little food coloring. Anyway, there's another option to try if you don't have paint. I use shaving cream straight on a laminate topped desk...it gets the desk super clean, even if the kids get super messy...lol. I also like to use letter tiles, clay rolled into snakes and formed into letters, wiki sticks, sidewalk chalk on the sidewalk, and those vibrating pens with lots of different tips.

      You can also play games using the words as game cards. I really like to use the phonograms for the game cards when they are learning all the sounds. Here is a link to several easy game boards.
      http://www.theschoolbell.com/Links/Dolch/Directions/gameboards.html
      This game board is intended to be used with Dolch Site words, but with adaptations works well for WRTR. (My adaptation for words, would be to have the child trace the letters while sounding out the words.) I found that the kids will review the same thing over and over if it is in a game format. I just printed some out on cardstock and colored them with brightly colored markers and some with scented markers. My kids also like to make up a sentence using the words we are practicing. They usually try to make up a silly sentence that involves a sibling.

      Here is another fun game that can be used with any word list, phonogram list, or even math facts, etc. It is called Roll, Say, Keep.
      http://www.theschoolbell.com/Links/Dolch/Directions/rollkeep.html

      The games do take a little longer than just teaching a lesson, but I find that I can get another reading session out of the day with them. We usually have a scheduled WRTR time using the lesson plans. Then we have another 10-15 minute slot of time in the afternoons for playing games to review. This is especially helpful with my daughter with dyslexia as she needs lots of exposure before she learns the phonograms and gets frustrated and tired easily.

      Hope this helps,
      Jammie



      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Mark and Suzanne Lichtenstein <pianoteachersuzanne@...>
      To: WRTR-Teachers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, September 9, 2008 8:33:19 AM
      Subject: [WRTR-Teachers] Re:practice of word list


      Jen,

      In addition to using the word multiple times, you can also use sensory integration techniques to lock the word into place. An example of this would be to have the child trace a word with his finger onto different textures, like onto velvet cloth or fine sandpaper. Have the child make the letters really big with his finger.

      I think someone else on this list once suggested making a "slate" out of a plastic ziploc-type bag with colored shaving cream or glue on the inside. The idea is to have the bag filled just enough so that when the child traces a letter with his finger on the outside of the sealed bag, the material inside squishes down to reveal the tabletop or whatever is underneath. In this way, he "writes."

      Best wishes,
      Suzanne






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ellie Andrew
      Remember that one of the reasons that the Spalding Method is so effective is that the children don t just memorize the words in the Extended Ayres List; they
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 9, 2008
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        Remember that one of the reasons that the Spalding Method is so effective is that the children don't just memorize the words in the Extended Ayres List; they analyze the words and use them in reading and writing. I would hesitate to put much time into other activities that rely on visual memory if there has been insufficient work in the Method areas.
         
        Ellie

        --- On Tue, 9/9/08, Mark and Suzanne Lichtenstein <pianoteachersuzanne@...> wrote:

        From: Mark and Suzanne Lichtenstein <pianoteachersuzanne@...>
        Subject: [WRTR-Teachers] Re:practice of word list
        To: WRTR-Teachers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, September 9, 2008, 8:33 AM






        Jen,

        In addition to using the word multiple times, you can also use sensory integration techniques to lock the word into place. An example of this would be to have the child trace a word with his finger onto different textures, like onto velvet cloth or fine sandpaper. Have the child make the letters really big with his finger.

        I think someone else on this list once suggested making a "slate" out of a plastic ziploc-type bag with colored shaving cream or glue on the inside. The idea is to have the bag filled just enough so that when the child traces a letter with his finger on the outside of the sealed bag, the material inside squishes down to reveal the tabletop or whatever is underneath. In this way, he "writes."

        Best wishes,
        Suzanne


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mark and Suzanne Lichtenstein
        Ellie, I agree with you completely. That s why I love WRTR. Even so, I know my kids. One of them is very logical, and the word analysis is enough for her.
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 10, 2008
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          Ellie,

          I agree with you completely. That's why I love WRTR. Even so, I know my kids. One of them is very logical, and the word analysis is enough for her. (And I was the same way.)

          By contrast, one of them is a hands-on learner, and needs to "do" something with the words other than just think about them and write them out. Using the words in real-life activities (aka games) really helps him.

          The other two children are in the middle. They could learn from word analysis alone, but the games are a nice reinforcement.

          Suzanne
        • Mark and Suzanne Lichtenstein
          Great ideas, Jammie! I m saving this post. Thanks! Suzanne
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 10, 2008
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            Great ideas, Jammie! I'm saving this post. Thanks!

            Suzanne
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