Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

WOSSNAME -- June 2010 -- Part 1 of 5

Expand Messages
  • granny_tude
    WOSSNAME Newsletter of the Klatchian Foreign Legion JUNE 2010 (Volume 13, Issue 6) *********************************************************************
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 28, 2010
    • 0 Attachment
      WOSSNAME
      Newsletter of the Klatchian Foreign Legion
      JUNE 2010 (Volume 13, Issue 6)
      *********************************************************************
      WOSSNAME is a FREE publication for members of the worldwide
      Klatchian Foreign Legion and its affiliates, including the North
      American Discworld Society and other continental groups. Are you a
      member? Yes, if you sent in your name, country and e-mail address.
      Are there any dues? No! As a member of the Klatchian Foreign Legion,
      you'd only forget them...
      *********************************************************************
      Editor in Chief: Annie Mac
      Editor Emeritus (retd): Joseph Schaumburger
      News Editor: Fiona (not Bruce) Bruce
      Newshounds: Vera, Mogg, Sir J of Croydon Below, the Shadow
      Staff Writers: Asti Osborn, Pitt the Elder, Steven D'Aprano
      Convention Reporters: Mithtrethth Hania Ogg et al
      Staff Technomancer: Jason Parlevliet
      Book Reviews: Drusilla D'Afanguin
      Puzzle Editor: Tiff
      Bard in Residence: Weird Alice Lancrevic
      DW Horoscope: Lady Anaemia Asterisk, Fernando Magnifico
      Emergency Staff: Jason Parlevliet
      World Membership Director: Steven D'Aprano (in his copious spare
      time)
      Copyright 2010 by Klatchian Foreign Legion

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------

      INDEX:

      ====Part 1 -- ALL THE NEWS THAT FITS

      01) QUOTE OF THE MONTH
      02) LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
      03) PTERRY'S ALTERNATE WORLDS
      04) SO... HOW MIGHTY IS YOUR PEN?
      05) THE DISCWORLD CUP: UPDATES
      06) PTERRY'S BRUSHES WITH DEATH...AND LIFE

      ====Part 2 -- REVIEWS, AND STUFF

      07) GOING POSTAL: TELEFILM REVIEWS
      08) ACTION REPLAY: PTERRY AND THE GUARDIAN BOOK CLUB

      ====Part 3 -- ...AND MORE...

      09) NEW ANKH-MORPORK STREET NAMES IN ROUNDWORLD
      10) WAYBACK TIME: PTERRY'S OLD SHORT STORIES
      11) AN ELEPHANT TO REMEMBER
      12) DISCWORLD PLAYS NEWS
      13) REMEMBERING THE LILAC
      14) CONVENTION NEWS

      ====Part 4 -- ...AND MORE, AND HOROSCOPE

      15) IMAGES OF THE MONTH
      16) BOOK REVIEWS
      17) NEW DISCWORLD TOTE BAGS
      18) DISCWORLD GROUPS MEETING NEWS
      19) YOUR MONTHLY DISCWORLD HOROSCOPE, MAR > AUG

      ====Part 5 -- HOROSCOPE, CONTINUED, AND CLOSE

      20) YOUR MONTHLY DISCWORLD HOROSCOPE, AUG > MAR
      21) CLOSE

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      01) QUOTE OF THE MONTH

      "You can't just put humour in a book. There has to be something to
      play it up against -- tragic relief."

      -- Pterry in The Guardian, June 2010

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      02) LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

      Despite the success of and critics' enthusiasm for Going Postal,
      there's been a certain amount of nitpicking, both broad and fine-
      ground, going on over in the alt.books.pratchett corner (among other
      Pratchett fan forums, no doubt). I decided not to publish extracts
      from that discussion because they would contain rather too much
      spoilage for you readers who haven't seen the film yet, but I will
      say that it reminded me of something from a few years ago -- namely
      the wailing and teeth-gnashing of JRR Tolkien fans when Peter
      Jackson's famous rendering of The Fellowship of the Ring hit the
      world's cinemas late in 2001. Yours truly was not among the wailers
      and gnashers, and not only because I believe that Team Jackson's
      nips, tucks and changes did nothing but improve on the source
      material; I also believe that it's pretty much impossible to deliver
      a novel directly to the screen, owing to the differing strengths and
      weaknesses of each medium.

      I'm not saying that every nip, tuck and change in Going Postal
      worked (see my review in part 2 for details), but what did work
      worked very well indeed, and most importantly, the *story* of Going
      Postal -- the essence of it, if you will -- came through with flying
      colours. And besides, The Author not only approved of various
      changes but also rolled up his wordsmithing sleeves and, in his own
      phrase, mucked about with the original novel himself, and that's
      good enough for me. Of course, that's my editorial opinion; your
      mileage may vary :-)

      Right, theres plenty of other exciting news this month, including
      new directions for our favourite novelist and a new writing
      competition. On with the show!

      -- Annie Mac, Editor

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      03) PTERRY'S ALTERNATE WORLDS

      New non-Discworld science fiction from Pterry is coming soon!

      The announcement, from publishers Transworld:

      Transworld Publishers are delighted to announce an exciting new
      collaboration between Sir Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter.

      Sir Terry Pratchett first developed his vision of a chain of
      parallel worlds, The Long Earth, in an unfinished novel and two
      short stories in 1986, after writing Equal Rites, the third novel in
      what would turn into the hugely successful Discworld series. Now, at
      last, this long-gestating concept is to see the light of day in two
      as-yet-untitled books written in collaboration with Stephen Baxter,
      author of Flood, Ark and the Time's Tapestry and Destiny's Children
      series.

      'Our Earth is but one of a chain of parallel worlds, each differing
      from its neighbours by a little (or a lot) in an infinite landscape
      of infinite possibilities. And you can just step from one world to
      the next...'

      The deal was brokered through Colin Smythe and Ralph Vicinanza and
      the first Long Earth novel is due to be published by Doubleday in
      spring 2012.

      Additionally, Sir Terry Pratchett has recently completed I Shall
      Wear Midnight, the fourth in the Tiffany Aching books, to be
      published in September, and is already at work on his next Discworld
      novel for publication in autumn 2011. Number 37 in the series,
      Unseen Academicals, has just come out in Corgi paperback.

      About Transworld:

      "Transworld Publishers was established in 1950 and since 1981 has
      been owned by Bertelsmann, becoming part of The Random House Group
      in 1998 when Bertelsmann acquired Random House. In the '60s and
      '70s, Transworld published such classics as Joseph Heller's Catch
      22, Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita, Frederick Forsyth's The Day of the
      Jackal and John Irving's The World According to Garp in Corgi
      paperback. During the '80s and '90s, Transworld grew... creating
      imprints Black Swan in '83, Bantam Press in '85, Bantam paperbacks
      in '87 and Doubleday in '89. In '92 it acquired the bestselling
      Expert gardening list. Transworld formed new partnerships with The
      Eden Project in 2001 and with Channel 4 in '04. It founded a new
      subsidiary company Transworld Ireland in Dublin in '08.

      "Today, Transworld [is] firmly established as the UK's leading
      fiction publisher... Transworld's leading non-fiction authors
      include Bill Bryson, Richard Dawkins, Stephen Hawking, Dr
      D.G.Hessayon, Paul McKenna and Robert Winston..."

      http://www.booksattransworld.co.uk/about/home.htm


      In The Guardian:

      "A way is found almost by accident for people to go from one world
      to another. An overarching theory here is how much our wars are
      caused by the scarcity of land. Supposing that the thickness of a
      thought away is another earth, almost exactly like this one, and as
      far as we can tell not inhabited by anything human. It'd be the land
      rush to end all land rushes. So off we go..."

      "I think Stephen Baxter is one of our best science fiction writers,
      and the best hard science fiction writer," he said. "I really like
      his stuff. There's a man who's at home with trillions..."

      http://tinyurl.com/2ao4sxg


      In The Bookseller:

      "The as-yet-untitled books -- a novel and two short stories -- are
      part of a series about a chain of parallel worlds called The Long
      Earth. The works are due to see the light of day in spring 2012, 26
      years after originally being conceived...."

      http://tinyurl.com/2bvpyht


      The iconic London booksellers Foyles, who are a bit of a gateway to
      other worlds themselves, also add some information about
      collaborator Baxter that not many might have known:

      "Although he has published more than 40 books and over 100 short
      stories, Baxter's background is as a maths and physics teacher and a
      chartered engineer. Highlighting his credentials as a science
      fiction writer, he mentioned that he applied to be a cosmonaut on
      the Mir space station in 1991..."

      http://tinyurl.com/2eyfuqk

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      04) SO... HOW MIGHTY IS YOUR PEN?

      Here be a press release from Transworld about a fascinating new
      original fiction novel competition:

      Sir Terry Pratchett and Transworld Publishers are proud to launch a
      new award for aspiring debut novelists, The Terry Pratchett Anywhere
      But Here, Anywhen But Now Prize.

      Transworld will offer the winning author a publishing contract with
      a £20,000 advance. The award will be judged by the esteemed Sir
      Terry Pratchett, the wise Tony Robinson, the savvy Mike Rowley from
      Waterstone's and two members of the editorial team at Transworld
      Publishers. Sir Terry Pratchett had this to say:

      "Anywhere but here, anywhen but now. Which means we are after
      stories set on Earth, although it may be an Earth that might have
      been, or might yet be, one that has gone down a different leg of the
      famous trousers of time (see the illustration in almost every book
      about quantum theory).

      "We will be looking for books set at any time, perhaps today,
      perhaps in the Rome of today but in a world where 2000 years ago the
      crowd shouted for Jesus Christ to be spared, or where in 1962, John
      F Kennedy's game of chicken with the Russians went horribly wrong.
      It might be one day in the life of an ordinary person. It could be a
      love story, an old story, a war story, a story set in a world where
      Leonardo da Vinci turned out to be a lot better at Aeronautics. But
      it won't be a story about being in an alternate Earth because the
      people in an alternate Earth don't know that they are; after all,
      you don't.

      "But this might just be the start. The wonderful Peter Dickinson
      once wrote a book that could convince you that flying dragons might
      have existed on Earth. Perhaps in the seething mass of alternate
      worlds humanity didn't survive, or never evolved -- but other things
      did, and they would have seen the world in a different way. The
      possibilities are literally endless, but remember, it's all on
      Earth. Maybe the continents will be different and the climate
      unfamiliar, but the physics will be the same as ours. What goes up
      must come down, ants are ant-sized because if they were any bigger
      their legs wouldn't carry them. In short, the story must be
      theoretically possible on some version of the past, present or
      future of a planet Earth."

      The deadline for submissions will be 31 December 2010 and a
      shortlist of six entries will be announced on the 31 March 2011. The
      winner will be announced by the end May 2011. Entrants must be over
      18, have no previous published full-length works of fiction and live
      in the UK, Ireland or the Commonwealth. Submissions should be
      emailed to: pratchettprize@... For full
      terms and conditions visit www.terrypratchett.co.uk

      Dust off your quills and begin!

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      05) THE DISCWORLD CUP: REMINDER

      We're up to the semifinals now. Semifinal 1 is Men at Arms versus
      Guards! Guards! Semifinal 2 is Night Watch versus Thud! A hard set
      of choices indeed. It's also amusing that the only two Discworld
      novels with exclamation marks in their official titles have made it
      into the semifinals. Perhaps it's the extra added enthusiasm?

      To vote, go to:
      http://www.discworldcup.co.uk/

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      06) PTERRY'S BRUSHES WITH DEATH...AND LIFE

      6.1 An interview by the Independent's Andrew Johnson, in which he
      talks with Pterry about Nation being shortlisted for the Carnegie
      Medal for Children's Literature, and a number of other topics:

      "Pratchett adds that the author's job is to tap into the 'common
      humanity' which holds us all together. But there is something else
      he's identified: the need to hold on to the past before it falls
      through our collective fingers. 'One of the things that intrigues me
      is that the past is so close. I might call my autobiography My Dad
      Could Have Shaken Hands with Wyatt Earp. My dad was nine years old
      when Earp died, and he's a historical character...'

      "It is rare for an author to enjoy both large sales and literary
      acclaim, and Pratchett, as a science-fantasy children's author, has
      long felt the stare of snooty disdain coming down the noses of the
      literary establishment. Hence his pleasure at his OBE in 1998, his
      knighthood in 2009, and his chuffedness at being shortlisted for
      another Carnegie. For all his pointed lack of expectation, however,
      Pratchett knows where real recognition lies: in 'queues going down
      the length of the street. Not that I write for the money. I write
      for the satisfaction of a job well done...'"

      http://tinyurl.com/35qeqaw


      6.2 An interview by Tim Oglethorpe in the Daily Mail, in which he
      talks with Pterry about the Going Postal telefilm, Alzheimer's, and
      the sexual allure of being a famous author:

      "Well I did have a spare afternoon, but I chose to go shopping
      instead because I love my wife, Lyn, and had no intention of
      straying after 41 happy years. In a funny way, I felt I had let the
      male side down by refusing this woman's overtures -- even though I
      was rather relieved to walk away..."

      http://tinyurl.com/2wg7e7a

      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      End of Part 1, continued on Part 2 of 5.
      If you did not get all five parts, write: interact@...
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Copyright (c) 2010 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.