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WOSSNAME -- MAY 2009 -- PART 3 OF 5

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  • Not A Granny
    WOSSNAME -- MAY 2009 -- PART 3 OF 5 (continued) ... oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ====Part 3 -- ODDS AND SODS AND WEIRD ALICE 29)
    Message 1 of 1 , May 28 1:45 AM
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      WOSSNAME -- MAY 2009 -- PART 3 OF 5 (continued)
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      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ====Part 3 -- ODDS AND SODS AND WEIRD ALICE

      29) EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT GOLEMS
      30) A.B.P. BITS
      31) WEIRD ALICE PRESENTS

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      29) SOME INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT GOLEMS

      For those of you who don't know about the story of Roundworld's
      Golem -- I certainly didn't! -- here is an interesting article in
      Scotland on Sunday:

      "Rabbi Judah Loew ben Bezalel is credited with creating the Golem...
      US first lady Michelle Obama paid her respects when she visited
      Loew's grave last month and placed a prayer on a piece of paper and
      put it near his tombstone. His creation is well known to the
      millions of readers of author Terry Pratchett's Discworld series, in
      which Golems, derived from Jewish tradition, play a starring
      role..."

      http://tinyurl.com/r75mpe

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      30) ABP BITS

      30.1 UNSEEN ACADEMICALS BLURB UP AT WATERSTONES

      Date: Fri, May 15 2009 4:05 am
      From: Daibhid Ceanaideach

      Being an obsessive compulsive, I have of course been checking the
      Waterstone's website fairly regularly in case it had started
      offering more information than "This book is not yet published. You
      can pre-order it." And it finally has.

      "Football has come to the ancient city of Ankh-Morpork -- not the
      old fashioned, grubby pushing and shoving, but the new, fast
      football with pointy hats for goalposts and balls that go going when
      you drop them. And now, the wizards of Unseen University must win a
      football match, without using magic, so they're in the mood for
      trying everything else. The prospect of the Big Match draws in a
      street urchin with a wonderful talent for kicking a tin can, a maker
      of jolly good pies, a dim but beautiful young woman, who might just
      turn out to be the greatest fashion model there has ever been, and
      the mysterious Mr Nutt (and no one knows anything much about Mr
      Nutt, not even Mr Nutt, which worries him, too). As the match
      approaches, four lives are entangled and changed for ever. Because
      the thing about football -- the important thing about football -- is
      that it is not just about football. Here we go! Here we go! Here we
      go!"

      http://www.waterstones.com/waterstonesweb/displayProductDetails.do?
      sku=6597150


      Thanks for the info. I checked Amazon and FWIW they say it will be
      available on 8th October 2009. Of course I'll believe that when it
      happens!!

      -- Bri Tze

      I got similar from Waterstones (got nearly enough points on my
      Regular Customer Card that I will be paying about 15p) about
      release date.

      In the meantime England are actually winning a Cricket match. I'm
      not usually a cricket watcher but the prospect of actually *winning*
      against the WIndies is strangely exciting. And looking a lot more
      likely than the chances of our nashnul football team winning
      against, well, anyone really. The local school's 5-a-side team play
      better.

      -- Gary


      30.2 ACCENTS IN DISCWORLD AUDIOBOOKS

      I was wondering if anyone's ever written anything up about the
      cultural significance of the various different accents assigned to
      the Discworld characters in the audiobook renditions by Nigel Planer
      and Stephen Briggs? As an American, I often find myself wondering
      why a given accent was assigned to a given character, what it's
      called, and what sort of person would have that accent in real life.

      -- Robotech_Master

      Good question -- I hope someone answers. I am really impressed with
      the two readers of TP's books. Listening to Feet of Clay now.

      -- Emma Anne

      Not sure if the accents have any cultural significance, rather than
      just being stock accents in Planer's palate (I haven't heard Stephen
      Briggs). For example, his Ludmilla sounded suspiciously like Neil,
      from the Young Ones.

      I suspect it's all in the ear of the beholder, but some accents,
      like the Scottish trolls, seem to work very well, while others, like
      the Belfast Colon are rather jarring.

      Very interesting topic, particularly if you are in the habit of
      reading the books aloud. My wife and I do this sometimes, and using
      accents adds a certain something.

      For what it's worth, we tend to use the following accents:
      Trolls - Planer's lowland Scots
      Dwarfs from Copperhead - Yorkshire
      Dwarfs from Uberwald - Welsh
      Nobby (and Gaspode) - Dudley Moore (in Dud mode)
      Colon - George Dixon
      Vampires(and Vampyres) - Standard Screen Transylvanian
      Nanny Ogg - Berkshire
      Granny - Southern English schoolmarm
      Mightily Oates - Derek Nimmo
      Vimes - John Thaw (the Sweeny version)
      Carrot - standard RAF subaltern type
      Death - Valentine Dyall
      Igor - Charles Laughton

      and so on. It can get quite difficult in crowd scenes. The Rude
      Mechanicals were the hardest, followed by the Illucidated Brethren.

      -- Doug Urquhart

      One of the editors of Guilty of Literature, Farah Mendlesohn, argues
      several things about Nigel Planer's "casting" of the audiobooks
      versus the Stephen Briggs versions. These are not quite direct
      quotes, but just because it was awkward to quote the conversation
      directly.

      1. Nigel Planer "casts" Colon-who grew up in Ankh-Morpork--as a
      thick Paddy (i.e., Irish).
      2. Carrot--who is from the Ramtops, has the same English accent as
      Vimes, who grew up in Ankh-Morpork.
      3. But both Briggs and Planer use London Jewish accents for Cut-Me-
      Own-Throat Dibbler.

      One of the other editors said that "Briggs carefully matched dwarf
      areas to British mining towns, so there are Welsh dwarves and
      Yorkshire dwarves, etc." So Mendlesohn argues that Briggs's
      versions are superior for these reasons. I can't comment directly,
      because I've never listened to any of them, but those
      considerations would certainly incline me to try Briggs first.

      -- Esmeraldus

      I think Planer's two touches of sheer genius were Tethys (who
      sounded like the captain of a lifeboat) and the Dowager Duchess of
      Quirm (can't remember her exact name) who sounded like a Windsor.

      I must confess that I tend to read Verence as a Windsor, too. In my
      mind, he sounds like Prince Charles.

      -- Doug Urquhart

      viz. "Never Mind the Quality -- Feel the Width" (60s British sitcom
      about a firm of tailors -- very witty given the era). I'm sure it
      must have been one of SirPTs inspirations.

      But, IMO, a sort of 'Del boy, Sarf Lunden wide-boy' would have
      fitted C.M.O.T. better. Yes/no?

      -- Steveski

      Why? Wasn't Verence raised as a fool, he'd sound as common as much
      surely?

      -- Ray Daley

      No a fool would have an accent to match his masters. The may want a
      fool but not a village idiot! Also the Fools' Guild provides a very
      high level of education and has an ear in most Royal Courts, with a
      bank balance to match ;-) .

      -- Reader in Invisible Writings

      But before the institution of "grammar" schools and places like
      Eton, weren't the accents of the nobility the same as their
      locale's?

      -- John Wilkins

      'viz. "Never Mind the Quality - Feel the Width" (60s British sitcom
      about a firm of tailors - very witty given the era). I'm sure it
      must have been one of SirPTs inspirations.'

      But which one? The Irish trousers-maker or the my-life-already
      jacket-maker? One of the points of the show was that whatever their
      differences, together they made good suits. I agree that it was an
      excellent show.

      'But, IMO, a sort of 'Del boy, Sarf Lunden wide-boy' would have
      fitted C.M.O.T. better. Yes/no?'

      Either is fine - after all they have a lot in common.

      'Why? Wasn't Verence raised as a fool, he'd sound as common as much
      surely?'

      Not after having been educated at the Fools' Guild, for one thing.
      For another, English comedians seem to fall into two main groups:
      the common-as-muck lot, such as Norman Wisdom, and the public-
      school lot, such as the Monty Python crew. Then there was Benny
      Hill, of course, who could be whatever was needed to make the joke
      as long as the word "knickers" came into it somewhere.

      'But before the institution of "grammar" schools and places like
      Eton, weren't the accents of the nobility the same as their
      locale's?'

      Not in Fantasy, or on the BBC.

      -- Lesley Weston

      Ah. Sorry. From the other side of the world it is hard to know the
      conventions...

      -- John Wilkins

      Perhaps, but the Disc *does* have places like Eton (which in our
      world was founded in 1440). Hugglestones is an example, as is the
      Assassins' Guild. Whether Verence I went to one of them is another
      question, but he probably had a tutor who taught him the proper way
      to speak.

      -- Dave

      Hiring governesses and tutors with desirable accents was common up
      until very recently. But it doesn't matter too much, because before
      public schools, gentlemen would not speak to each other in common
      English, but use Latin or French. Anyhow, Discworld's weird era is
      closer to the industrial revolution than medieval times. People
      (and unpeople) travel.

      Regards,
      -- *Art

      I'd say that Hugglestones is more like Gordonstone (sp?) than Eton.
      But I would agree about the Assassins Guild.

      -- Bri Tze

      When I did my RAF Basic Training (back when RAF Swinderby still
      existed as a unit) my 1st squadron was full of Glaswegians and over
      the time I was with them I found myself speaking more like them. My
      mum even remarked on my inherited Scottish accent when I 1st came
      home on leave. I found that whatever accent was the most dominant
      that surrounded me suddenly sank into my subconcious and I
      gradually adapted into it. PS. The process happens a LOT faster
      when your drunk.

      I wonder if Verence would have encountered the same during his
      training. Its like Vimes' comment in Jingo that you see a face that
      has camels written all over it but when they spoke it was Ankhian
      thick enough to float rocks in.

      -- Ray Daley

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      31) WEIRD ALICE PRESENTS...

      UBERWALD

      Today is gonna be the day
      That they're gonna go attackin' you
      No doubt you should've got out
      When apprised of their point of view
      I don't believe that living bodies feel the way they do
      -- they got'cha now

      Bat flight, the creatures of the night
      Have a hunger for a quart of "vine"
      Undead, they're messing with your head
      Cos they're clever and they want to dine
      I don't believe that living bodies feel the way they do
      -- they got'cha now

      And all the castle towers attract the lightning
      And all the native species here are frightening
      There are bloody fangs that they would
      Like to sink in you
      If you don't go *now*

      Because maybe
      The garlic and the cross will save me
      Cos after all
      We're in Uberwald

      Today is gonna be the day
      That they're gonna set the Pack on you
      By now you should've somehow
      Realized that the tales are true
      I know you'll bleed like anybody
      "Heel!" and "Sit!" won't do, they got'cha now

      And all the castle towers attract the lightning
      And all the native species here are frightening
      Creepy-crawly Things, they would
      Delight to snack on you
      If you don't go *now*

      Because maybe
      The garlic and the cross will save me
      Cos after all
      We're in Uberwald

      And maybe
      The garlic and the cross will--
      !


      Note for Roundworlders: the original lyrics to Wonderwall, by Oasis,
      can be found at:

      http://www.metrolyrics.com

      @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@

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      End of Part 3 -- continued on Part 4 of 5.
      If you did not get all five parts, write: interact@...
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      Copyright (c) 2009 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
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