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WOSSNAME -- NOVEMBER 2008 -- PART 3 OF 6

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  • Not A Granny
    WOSSNAME -- NOVEMBER 2008 -- PART 3 OF 6 (continued) ... oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ====Part 3 -- ...AND MORE NEWS AND REVIEWS... 17)
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 27, 2008
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      WOSSNAME -- NOVEMBER 2008 -- PART 3 OF 6 (continued)
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      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ====Part 3 -- ...AND MORE NEWS AND REVIEWS...

      17) THE TURTLE MOVES! REVIEWS AND NEWS
      18) THE MAKING OF THE COLOUR OF MAGIC: VADIM JEAN
      19) ANIMATED PRATCHETT FILM NOT HAPPENING
      20) TRYMON'S SORE FEET
      21) THE MAN WHO PUT DISCWORLD ON TELLY
      22) PRATCHETT PRICES IN FOURECKS
      23) IMAGES OF THE MONTH
      24) A CERTAIN AUTHOR POPULARISES 'EMBUGGERANCE'
      25) REVIEW: NATION, BY AUTHOR NORAH PIEHL
      26) CURIOSITIES OF ROUNDWORLD: THE REAL LESHP
      27) "WITH GREAT PLEASURE": A REMINDER

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      17) THE TURTLE MOVES! NEWS AND REVIEWS

      17.1 PODCAST INTERVIEW

      Lawrence Watt-Evans was interviewed by Summer Brooks for the Dragon
      page Cover to Cover podcast series (podcast #336a). Listen online or
      download from here:

      http://www.dragonpage.com/2008/11/17/cover-to-cover-336a/


      17.2 WIN A FREE COPY OF THE TURTLE MOVES!

      Also by way of The Dragon Page, BenBella Books will be giving away
      two signed copies of The Turtle Moves!: Discworld's Story
      Unauthorized! This contest is via email and is open to residents of
      the USA and Canada. The competition runs from 17th November until
      midnight (Pacific time) on 5th December 2008. For entry details, go
      to:

      http://www.sliceofscifi.com/2008/11/17/the-turtle-moves-giveaway/


      17.3 ANOTHER ONLINE REVIEW

      By Bruce Grossman on Bookgasm:

      "What Watt-Evans does really well is set up the book to where it can
      either be read right through or just for the books that you are a
      fan of instead. He covers each book or story as they were published,
      giving synopses without major spoilers, at the same time discussing
      how they fit into the larger world of the series..."

      http://www.bookgasm.com/reviews/entertainment/the-turtle-moves/

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      18) "MORE TURTLE!" VADIM JEAN ON THE MAKING OF tCoM

      from Sci Fi Wire:

      "Jean said that the miniseries will also make more use of the
      turtle. 'Because I'm hoping that we'll get to make a whole series of
      these films, and if people came to them fresh, they'll start with
      The Color of Magic,' he said. 'So I wanted to make sure that we
      really established the turtle, because a lot of the story is about
      what happens to it, and we get to see the edge of Discworld, we get
      to see the middle, and we get to see...'"

      http://www.scifi.com/scifiwire/index.php?category=0&id=62311

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      19) DANNY BOYLE: NO PRATCHETT PROJECT AFTER ALL

      "One I was working on (an adaptation of Terry Pratchett's fantasy
      tales The Bromeliad Trilogy) is a DreamWorks project. They've got
      the rights, but it didn't work out because it's just too expensive.
      You talk about indie financing being troublesome -- animation is so
      expensive because you can't estimate how long its going to take."

      http://tinyurl.com/56txzh

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      20) TRYMON'S SORE FEET

      "For Tim Curry, playing the evil maniac, Trymon, in Terry
      Pratchett's The Color of Magic was a painful experience —
      literally. He tells us that after playing King Arthur in Spamalot in
      New York and London, he was having foot problems..."

      http://tinyurl.com/6ccf6o

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      21) THE MAN WHO PUT DISCWORLD ON TELLY

      An interview with Richard Woolfe of Sky TV:

      "We've had two amazing successes with [Terry Pratchett's] The
      Colour of Magic and Hogfather, and now we're in development on the
      next one, Going Postal, which is great fun. We're finalizing our
      plans with that franchise."

      http://tinyurl.com/5db8sa

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      22) PRATCHETT PRICES IN FOURECKS

      From The Age:
      "Terry Pratchett's The Illustrated Wee Free Men, for instance, is
      advertised at $49.50, when the recommended price is $45. But
      Pratchett's Nation is 32.95, while the recommended is $49.95. Dymocks,
      like most booksellers, is selling both for the recommended price."

      http://www.tinyurl.com.au/x.php?1iqw

      [Except that my local Dymocks had Nation for $37.95. And
      Angus&Robertson, for $34.95. -- ConMan of BU]

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      23) IMAGES OF THE MONTH

      23.1 GUARDS! GUARDS! AT TRING, HERTS (UK)

      Frayed Knott Theatre Company presented Guards! Guards! at The Court
      Theatre, Tring last week. Unfortunately, the play wasn't advertised
      until after the October issue of WOSSNAME, but it looks like the
      production had plenty of sizzle, to judge from the excellent
      Librarian, Death and Dwarf costumes:

      http://tinyurl.com/5zmwfv


      23.2 THE MORPORKIAN EMBASSY IN BONK?!

      Brought to our attention by Mrs Cake of BU. All it needs is an
      Igor...except he'd be standing right behind the iconographer, of
      course:

      http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/01450u.jpg

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      24) A CERTAIN AUTHOR POPULARISES 'EMBUGGERANCE'

      Now that the American presidential election is over, the world can
      go back to more general politician-watching -- for example, the
      gossipworthy behaviours of UK politicians. But even there, there are
      Pratchett references...like this one from the Globe and Mail
      (Canada):

      "And while 'embuggerance' has been noted before, it's never achieved
      the poignancy it did when author Terry Pratchett used the word to
      describe his struggle..."

      http://tinyurl.com/5hjr3k

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      25) NATION

      Reviewed by author and blogger Norah Piehl

      "While certainly appealing to his legions of existing devotees,
      NATION should help broaden Pratchett's fan base significantly" --
      Piehl gives Nation the maximum five stars

      I was fortunate enough to discover Terry Pratchett's books about
      young witch-in-training Tiffany Aching a few years back. Since then,
      I've been recommending these titles -- and the rest of his stellar
      Discworld novels -- to friends and family, young and old alike.
      Pratchett is sometimes dismissed as only a humorist, an author of
      light fantasy that, while offering plenty of comedic social satire,
      doesn't have much backbone. I would beg to differ with that
      characterization of the Discworld series, which has as much heart as
      it does humor.

      But, with the publication of NATION, a stand-alone novel that is not
      part of the Discworld oeuvre, Pratchett should silence those
      criticisms once and for all. NATION is at once adventurous and
      contemplative, playful and philosophical, and it should appeal to
      long-time devotees of the author and new fans alike.

      NATION is not set in Discworld but rather in a world that bears a
      great deal of resemblance to our own in the mid-19th century. There
      are a few differences in history and geography, but cultural issues
      such as scientific investigation, the rights of women, and the role
      and responsibility of the monarchy and religion will certainly be
      familiar to any student of the Victorian period, even if Pratchett
      takes some delightful liberties with the historical record.

      Ermintrude is the teenage daughter of the Governor of Port Mercia,
      who had been 139th in line for the throne of England. That is, until
      a bout of influenza wipes out everyone between him and the throne.
      The only problem? The presumptive king is thousands of miles away,
      governing one of the dozens of tiny tropical islands that dot the
      Southern Pelagic Ocean and contribute to the nation's extensive
      empire. His daughter is also at sea, on a ship called the Sweet Judy
      with an unscrupulous crew, eager to join her father. Neither one of
      them has any idea of the myriad ways in which their fortunes are
      about to change.

      Ermintrude's fortune changes dramatically indeed, when a killer
      tsunami runs the Sweet Judy aground on a tiny island. Ermintrude is
      the only survivor of the shipwreck and, as she soon discovers, is
      one of only two people left alive on the devastated island. The
      other is Mau, a teenage boy who was in the process of successfully
      passing his manhood ceremony when the tsunami destroyed his entire
      Nation. Now Mau is confused about his place in the world. If he has
      left his boy's soul behind but not yet been given a man's soul, does
      that make him a human? A demon? Or something else entirely?

      Mau and Ermintrude (who quickly takes this opportunity to rename
      herself Daphne instead of her given name, which she has always
      hated) don't have too much time to consider these philosophical
      details. There are hundreds of dead to be buried at sea, shelters to
      be made, fires to be built, new languages and customs to be learned,
      and, soon, as dozens of desperate refugees from other islands arrive
      at the Nation seeking support, other people's problems to which to
      attend.

      Daphne, who has lived her whole life under the thumb of her martinet
      grandmother, soon discovers she has a passion for doctoring, a
      talent for making beer, and an appreciation for walking around in
      the tropical climate in just her petticoat and pantaloons. Mau, who
      continues to question his soul's worth and his own place in a
      warlike culture, grows into a capable, confident and kind chief of
      this new Nation. Together, Daphne and Mau develop a new civilization
      -- and learn truths about Mau's people's history that may change
      views of science, culture and religion forever.

      NATION may be more philosophically dense and less broadly comic than
      most of Pratchett's Discworld novels. There's plenty of adventure to
      be had, though -- with shipwrecks, cannibals, murders and even a
      hidden sacred burial ground. While certainly appealing to his
      legions of existing devotees, NATION should help broaden his fan
      base significantly. It raises some of the most fundamental moral and
      ethical questions that humans have always struggled with, and then
      turns them on their head in ways surprising, thought provoking and,
      finally, eminently satisfying.


      (c) Copyright 1997-2008, Teenreads.com. All rights reserved.
      Reprinted with permission.

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      26) ROUNDWORLD'S LESHP: FERDINANDEA aka GRAHAM ISLAND

      The volcanic island of Ferdinandea lies some 30km south of Sicily,
      and like a number of volcanic islands, has played hide and seek over
      the years -- and just as Ankh-Morpork and Klatch contested the here-
      today-gone-tomorrow island of Leshp, no fewer than four Roundworld
      nations have disputed Ferdinandea's ownership.

      Ferdinandea (or Graham Island, or Julia, Sciacca, Nertita, Corrao,
      or Hotham, depending on which nation was claiming it at the time) is
      part of the underwater volcano Empedocles, which is situated in a
      volcanic area known as the Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia located
      between Sicily and Tunisia in the Mediterranean. Volcanic activity
      at Ferdinandea was noted thousands of years ago during the First
      Punic War (264-241 BC), was also recorded in 10 BC, and has since
      appeared and disappeared four or five times, with several risings
      reported since the 17th century.

      The island's most recent appearance above sea level occurred in
      1831, when it became the subject of a four-way dispute over its
      sovereignty: on July 18 1831, Capt Humphrey Le Fleming Senhouse led
      a British naval party to the summit and named it Graham Island after
      the first lord of the admiralty, Sir James Robert George Graham. The
      king of Naples, Ferdinand II, was furious at losing a potentially
      strategic base and sent a warship to replace the union flag and
      claim it as Ferdinandea for the Bourbon crown; the French navy made
      a landing and called the island Julia; and Spain also declared its
      territorial ambitions. The dispute nearly caused open war and was
      still unresolved by early 1832, but all became moot as the island --
      comprising about 4.8 square kilometres at its maximum area and 63
      metres above sea level at its greatest height -- began to erode and
      disappear beneath the sea a few months later. By 8th December 1831,
      an exploring party found nothing but a small column of hot water
      that stank of bitumen, and nine days later two officers of the
      Naples Topographical Office found that the entire island was covered
      by the sea.

      One particularly amusing event of note occurred during this brief
      rising: two English tourists braved the heat and stench and ankle-
      deep volcanic debris -- not to mention the danger of the active
      volcano itself -- in order to have breakfast on the island. How very
      Victorian...though the Ramkin family would also surely have
      approved!

      Fresh eruptions in 1863 caused the island to reappear briefly before
      again sinking below sea level. After 1863 the volcano lay dormant
      for many decades, its summit just eight metres below sea level. In
      1987, it was apparently mistaken for a Libyan submarine and bombed
      by a U.S. Air Force plane on its way to bomb Tripoli.

      In 2002, renewed seismic activity around Ferdinandea led
      vulcanologists to speculate that a new eruption might be imminent,
      and that the seamount might once again become an island. To
      forestall any renewal of the 19th-century sovereignty disputes,
      Italian divers planted a flag on the top of the volcano in
      anticipation of its expected resurfacing. But the eruption never
      occurred, and as of 2006 Ferdinandea's summit remains about six
      metres below sea level. Nonetheless, Sicilians summoned the
      descendant of the Bourbon King of Naples, and in a ceremony filmed
      by a flotilla of camera crews, Prince Carlo di Bourbon lowered a
      plaque into the waves and told cheering locals: "It will always be
      Sicilian."


      Sources:

      http://www.grifasi-sicilia.com/isolaferdinandeagbr.html
      http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2000/nov/13/rorycarroll1
      http://ferdinandea.com/

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      27) "WITH GREAT PLEASURE": A REMINDER

      BBC Radio 4'S "With Great Pleasure", featuring Terry Pratchett, will
      be broadcast at 10am (Greenwich time) on Christmas Day. The winner
      of the two available tickets to the show was Kate Gowers.
      Presumably, a good time was had by all!

      http://www.pjsmprints.com/news/index.html

      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

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      End of Part 3, continued on Part 4 of 6.
      If you did not get all six parts, write: interact@...
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      Copyright (c) 2008 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
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