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WOSSNAME -- NOVEMBER 2008 -- PART 2 OF 6

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  • Not A Granny
    WOSSNAME -- NOVEMBER 2008 -- PART 2 OF 6 (continued) ... oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ====Part 2 -- MORE NEWS... 9) CONVENTION NEWS
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 27, 2008
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      WOSSNAME -- NOVEMBER 2008 -- PART 2 OF 6 (continued)
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      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ====Part 2 -- MORE NEWS...

      9) CONVENTION NEWS
      10) MICRO ART STUDIO DISCWORLD FIGURINES UPDATE
      11) GAMES NEWS: RHIANNA PRATCHETT
      12) ACTION REPLAY: IN TEXT, THIS TIME
      13) REVIEW: THE FOLKLORE OF DISCWORLD
      14) REVIEW: NATION, THE AUDIOBOOK
      15) THE GUARDIAN APPROVES...
      16) ANOTHER LITTLE EDITOR IN THE MAKING?

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      9) 9) CONVENTION NEWS

      9.1 THE DWCON DVD COMETH

      2008 Discworld Double-Anniversary DVD

      "At the opening ceremony of the 2008 Discworld Convention, we
      announced the making of a DVD to celebrate the double anniversary of
      25 years of Discworld books and 60 years of Terry Pratchett. Well,
      we now have a trailer for you to view or download. The full DVD
      contains in-depth interviews with key figures in the Discworld
      Universe (e.g. Stephen Briggs, Bernard Pearson) as well as
      recordings from the Convention itself, including Terry's opening
      ceremony speech and the 'Disc Is Your World' event. All profits from
      the sale of the DVD will go to the Alzheimer's Research Trust.

      "We took over 160 pre-orders for the DVD from our members at the
      Convention and will shortly be opening the same opportunity to the
      general public. This will be at the same price of £10 plus postage
      and packing, until 1st December 2008 -- at which point the price
      will rise to £15."

      http://www.dwcon.org/news/display-item.php?newsid=160


      9.2 THE RINCEWIND OF CHANGE

      "I've been rumbled by the Discworld lot! Hello to the charming bunch
      at the Cunning Artificer forum, who seem to have recently discovered
      Wiffle Lever and been very nice about it so far..."

      An unusual point of view from an unusual attendee at the 2008 DWcon:

      http://tinyurl.com/6kn6mu

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      10) MORE DISCWORLD FIGURINES COMING

      As noted last month, Micro-Art Studios have been licensed to issue a
      series of Discworld miniatures, based on Paul Kidby's images of
      various characters. The first five figurines -- Death, Granny
      Weatherwax, Vimes, Nanny Ogg and Rincewind, have now been released;
      next up, and coming soon, will be Corporal Nobbs and the Luggage.

      For more details see:

      http://www.shop.microartstudio.com/discworld-miniatures-c-48.html

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      11) GAMES NEWS -- PRATCHETT: THE NEXT GENERATION

      11.1 RUNNING THE MIRROR'S EDGE WITH RHIANNA PRATCHETT

      "Pratchett started writing as a journalist, working for magazines
      such as PC Zone and the U.K. based newspaper The Guardian. The
      writer made her big jump to video games after she left her job with
      PC Zone and received a rather fortuitous phone call. 'I got a call
      from a developer who was looking for a story editor for his next
      game,' Pratchett told CBR. 'As a journo I'd been a big supporter
      of his previous game and he remembered me. I said yes and it went
      from there really. I actually got one or two of my easiest gigs from
      developers whose games I'd been a fan of. Who says being a fangirl
      never pays off!'

      http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=18743


      11.2 REVIEW OF THE MIRROR'S EDGE

      from kotaku.com:

      "This game has gotten a lot of attention – not just for the
      parkour gameplay, but also for Faith and her dynamic background
      that's meant to jibe perfectly with the plot authored by Rhianna
      Pratchett (daughter of novelist Terry Pratchett). But for all its
      edginess, does Mirror's Edge really stand apart as a different
      kind of game, or does it fall short of the far window ledge of
      innovation?"

      http://tinyurl.com/5adzjz

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      12) ACTION REPLAY, SORT OF: Den of Geek review of tCoM DVD

      "As a card-carrying member of the Word Play Appreciation League, I
      love the narration (by Brian Cox) and dialogue peppered with puns.
      Much of it is groan-inducing, but you're grinning while you're
      groaning and it's all good fun."

      "Costumes, sets, scenery and effects are first-rate... It's easy
      enough to get swept up into this world on a plate that is just left
      of centre of ours and you might even forget this is made-for-TV
      fare."

      http://tinyurl.com/6zy4xw

      Also, last month's feature about a Den of Geek competition to win
      The Colour of Magic on DVD is now closed:

      "The competition is over now, and thanks to everyone who entered...
      Many thanks to everyone who entered for this great prize, which went
      to Ben Stockman in London. Well done, Ben!"

      The winning answers were:

      1.) What is the name of the tavern where Twoflower befriends and
      hires Rincewind? {The Broken Drum}

      2.) In what type of business is Twoflower employed back on the
      Counterweight Continent? {Insurance (or inn-sewer-ants)}

      3.) What does Cohen the Barbarian buy for himself? {Dentures (made
      of troll's teeth)}

      http://tinyurl.com/6g3j3c

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      13) "OF COURSE, WHAT EVERYONE KNOWS IS WRONG..."

      A review of The Folklore of Discworld, by Terry Pratchett and
      Jacqueline Simpson (which is also somewhat wrong, but not in a bad
      way)

      by Annie Mac

      A friend of mine is unsettlingly enthusiastic about a current BBC
      television series called Merlin. After listening to her wax lyrical
      about the show, I pointed out that I was pretty sure Malory never
      said anything about young Arthur and Merlin being slacker teens and
      that Uther Pendragon definitely wasn't a long-suffering sitcom
      father -- at which point she confessed to me that the film Monty
      Python and the Holy Grail was her first experience of the Arthurian
      legends, so that approach to Merlin seemed completely reasonable and
      familiar...even traditional.

      It's fascinating how folklore and enduring tales get mucked about in
      their passage down through the years. Whether by Chinese whispers,
      by amalgamation with other stories and legends, or by the "magic" of
      Hollywood, things change and every new generation inherits a version
      that might be ever more distant from the original source. These
      days, everyone knows that the tradition of silver weapons being
      lethal to werewolves comes from the Olde Dayes of Europe...except
      that it was a twentieth-century invention by the American film
      industry. Everyone knows that the magpie rhyme goes "One for sorrow,
      two for joy"...except in the many regions where it doesn't. Everyone
      knows that the "ring of roses" rhyme (also known by various regional
      names) refers to the Black Death...except that it doesn't. Part of
      the job of a folklorist is to track down stories and traditions and
      rhymes and "folk wisdom" as far as possible towards their sources,
      by way of local documents and village elders and whatnot; the
      results can be astonishing or edifying or even disappointing, but
      they are always interesting. And that's where Terry Pratchett, as a
      picker-up of unregarded trifles, and Jacqueline Simpson, as a well-
      established folklore detective, come in.

      The Folklore of Discworld seems to me to be, title credits
      notwithstanding, not so much a book by Terry Pratchett and
      Jacqueline Simpson as a book by Simpson with Pratchett's blessing.
      Once you get past the preface (definitely by Mr Pratchett), the body
      of the text is unquestionably hers (apart from the many snippets of
      Discworld novels quoted in illustration). This is certainly nothing
      to complain about: Ms Simpson is an articulate and engaging writer
      who wields a fine turn of phrase on her wordsmithing anvil and who
      has no fear of rough-and-ready vernacular. She gleefully presents
      the Discworld universe as no less real than our own rubber-sheet
      reality, and classifies various tales, practices, creatures and bits
      of geography into three broad categories (things from Discworld that
      have leaked into our own world, things from our world that have
      leaked into Discworld, and things that are, as it were, universal
      throughout both universes...and probably throughout all the others)
      Her findings take us all the way from world-turtle creation myths at
      the start to death -- and Death -- at the finish (well, where else
      would one put a chapter about Death?). And when the reader gets to
      the finish, there is a fine bibliography (including some of
      Simpson's other works, and indeed why not) and suggestions for
      further reading.

      One of my favourite chapters is about the Nac Mac Feegle -- yes,
      they get an entire chapter; if they didn't, they would probably
      steal one anyway. As an original native of the so-called British
      Isles, I've had much experience of the wilder sorts of Scots and I
      tend to forget that many Discworld readers might not recognise the
      Feegles' roots of Scottishness (with a generous wallop of
      Glaswegian-ness thrown in, especially the Glaswegian-ness of central
      Glasgow on a Saturday night). The Folklore of Discworld presents
      those roots, going all the way back to the legendary Finn MacCool,
      but Simpson cheekily suggests that it might be that the Scots got
      their trademark Scottishness from the Nac Mac Feegle's extended stay
      in our world, rather than the other way around. I was also pleased
      to see the confirmation (ish) of what I'd always assumed -- that Wee
      Mad Arthur and Buggy Swires are almost certainly urbanised rogue
      Feegles, rather than gnomes.

      At 372 pages, The Folklore of Discworld is a wide-ranging and
      ambitious book that covers a lot of territory and includes
      historical fact as well as folklore and fairy tales. I have to admit
      that there was very little in it that I didn't already know, but
      then I've made a lifelong practice of reading everything I can get
      my hands on and I have lived in some colourful rural areas with my
      ears wide open (as Simpson points out, folklorists tend to ignore
      cities since cities are perceived as being too well organised to
      generate *real* folklore...though urban legends are alive and well,
      so maybe that's an unreasonable prejudice). For most readers, The
      Folklore of Discworld makes a useful resource and will be great fun
      for reading aloud to friends and family. It's a handsome book as
      well, liberally sprinkled with Paul Kidby's famous illustrations.
      Highly recommended as a Hogswatch present.

      A wee thought in closing: when I first got to know my husband, I was
      nonplussed to discover that he'd got most of his pop-culture
      education by way of parodies in episodes of The Simpsons. Since that
      beloved cartoon has been running for so long and has covered so many
      films, books, tales and, yes, urban legends, and since -- presumably
      -- millions of viewers are like my husband in terms of never having
      read, seen or heard the source material for those parodies, I think
      a Folklore of the Simpsons book would be a bestseller. And who
      better to tackle it than a folklorist who shares that surname? Go
      for it, Ms Simpson!


      THE FOLKLORE OF DISCWORLD
      Doubleday, 2008
      ISBN 9780385611008

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      14) REVIEW: NATION AUDIOBOOK

      Nation (audiobook) – by Terry Pratchett, read by Stephen Briggs

      a review by Dianne Hughes

      When it comes to audio versions of the Discworld books, I personally
      much prefer Tony Robinson to Stephen Briggs, as Robinson's voices
      and characterisations are in my opinion more enjoyable. But
      unfortunately those are abridged and you find the interesting bits
      are missing. My CD player breathed its last on the final CD of
      Nation -- I'm not sure if there is a message in that event!

      The book is full of the wonderful satirical talent which makes
      Pratchett one of my favourite authors. It is set in an alternative
      world (down a different trouser leg to the real world) but almost
      everything in the story is familiar. I enjoyed the joy and wonder of
      the experience Mau goes through when he finishes his transition from
      child to adult and is looking forward to seeing his parents and
      friends again (even having the ceremony with sharp knife, during
      which you weren't allowed to cry out). The description of the
      tsunami put me in mind of the description by a Royal Navy midshipman
      who survived the disaster of the Krakatau eruption.

      As usual, the wonderful mind pictures which are evoked when you
      listen to the description of the trauma Mau went through when he
      found all of his family dead, and of the way he closed his mind and
      just went about the task of burying all -- even the dogs and the
      pigs were treated respectfully. He felt he was a ghost and didn't
      see Daphne but noted the strange footprints. Daphne (not her real
      name) was the victim of a shipwreck on her way to join her father
      who was the Governor of an island. The foul-mouthed parrot belonging
      to the late captain of the ship Sweet Judy, who took a dislike to
      the "grandfather birds", was very funny. I've tried to work out what
      the birds are in our world but have given up.

      Captain Roberts was my childhood impression of my Methodist
      relatives brought to life, including the hymns, all lightning and
      brimstone. Sailing the Sweet Judy into the top of the forest singing
      hymns must be one of the most wonderful word pictures on the CD. His
      lack of fear is admirable, even as he sails into the jungle and
      crashes into a valley filled with trees.

      The tragedy of the death of Daphne's mother and little brother and
      her recurring memory of the baby's tiny coffin sitting on top of the
      mother's troubled me; I wonder how often this has an effect on
      children.

      Despite the differences in their cultures, Daphne and Mau manage to
      work life out, even though the priest who joined them (another
      survivor of the tsunami) caused more trouble than he was worth. The
      arrival of the baddies gave a bit of excitement to the story.

      I loved the various characters and the stories they tell and the
      problems which come with them, and the ending is so lovely. A story
      well worth hearing and sometime in the future also reading.

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      15) THE GUARDIAN APPROVES OF PEOPLE READING PRATCHETT...

      The Guardian's usual smarmy self-aggrandising opinion pages list
      fantasy books, especially Gaiman and Pratchett, as the number one
      'guilty pleasure'. Sounds to me like they could do with some fresh
      Lancre air and a dose of harden-up reality, because there's no shame
      in loving good fiction...

      http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2008/nov/02/women

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      16) ANOTHER LITTLE EDITOR IN THE MAKING?

      An announcement in Locus Magazine's "Milestones" column:

      "Discworld Monthly editor JASON ANTHONY & wife LISA are the parents
      of ISOBEL SUSAN ANTHONY, born October 7, 2008. She joins older
      sisters Emily and Lucy."

      [Editor's note: Surely that should be *Ysabell* Susan, hmm?]

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      End of Part 2 -- continued on Part 3 of 6.
      If you did not get all six parts, write: interact@...
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      Copyright (c) 2008 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
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