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WOSSNAME -- OCTOBER 2008 -- PART 3 OF 6

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  • Not A Granny
    WOSSNAME -- OCTOBER 2008 -- PART 3 OF 6 (continued) ... oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ====Part 3 -- ...AND MORE NEWS AND REVIEWS... 20)
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 27, 2008
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      WOSSNAME -- OCTOBER 2008 -- PART 3 OF 6 (continued)
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      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ====Part 3 -- ...AND MORE NEWS AND REVIEWS...

      20) TRANSCRIPT OF PTERRY'S Q & A ON THE 'SECOND LIFE' NATION
      21) MICRO ART STUDIO TO RELEASE DISCWORLD FIGURINES
      22) ACTION REPLAY: THE ARIA FROM MASKERADE
      23) TIM WHITE: ANOTHER OFFICIAL DISCWORLD ARTIST TO ENJOY
      24) CONVENTION NEWS
      25) PTERRY ON THE TUBE
      26) REVIEW OF THE ILLUSTRATED WEE FREE MEN
      27) BLOG REVIEW OF THE FOLKLORE OF DISCWORLD
      28) REVIEW OF ONLY YOU CAN SAVE MANKIND ON TOR.COM
      29) BLOG REVIEW OF THE TURTLE MOVES - BY ITS AUTHOR!
      30) IT'S ALL ABOUT THE BRAAAAINSSS: A PAEAN TO REG SHOE

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      20) TRANSCRIPT OF PTERRY'S Q & A ON THE 'SECOND LIFE' NATION

      From Lynsey at www.between-the-lines.co.uk

      "Terry Pratchett has appeared in the virtual world Second Life,
      taking part in a live Q&A with fans from around the globe. Terry
      answered a host of questions in the author auditorium on Elysian
      Isle and then teleported to the Nation island to meet more fans..."

      The full transcript of Terry's Second Life interview is available
      at:

      http://www.your2ndplace.com/node/1326

      See http://www.between-the-lines.co.uk/?p=257 for more info.


      Edited transcript and screen captures of Terry's Second Life Q&A:
      http://community.livejournal.com/nadwcon2009/20948.html

      Full unedited transcript (with lots of chatter)
      http://www.fromrimtohub.com/525/terry-pratchett-life/

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      21) MICRO ART STUDIO TO RELEASE DISCWORLD FIGURINES

      Micro Art Studio have added the first five of their officially
      licenced 30mm Discworld miniatures to their online store. They are
      accepting orders for the figures and will not be shipping them from
      29th October 2008. The five miniatures include Samuel Vimes,
      Rincewind, Nanny Ogg, Esme Weatherwax, and Death.

      These are excellent figurines. My favourites are Nanny Ogg -- who
      comes complete with broomstick, Greebo curled around her shoulders
      and a mug of scumble in her hand -- and Vimes, who looks like he
      means serious business, but all of them look first-rate! Each
      miniature costs €8.54, with the exception of Death, who costs
      €9.76. Must be all the extra work sharpening that scythe...or
      maybe the fact that Death of Rats is nicely rendered, peeking out
      from the bottom of Death's cloak...

      http://www.shop.microartstudio.com/

      For a closer look:

      Nanny Ogg: http://tinyurl.com/6fhwta
      Sam Vimes: http://tinyurl.com/69jyes
      Death: http://tinyurl.com/6czh5j
      Rincewind: http://tinyurl.com/5tskyq
      Granny Weatherwax: http://tinyurl.com/5fel2k

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      22) ACTION REPLAY: THE ARIA FROM MASKERADE

      For those of you who may have missed the Roundworld rendition of the
      'Departure' aria from 'La Triviata' that moved Doctor Undershaft to
      tears in Maskerade, here are the links again:

      http://tinyurl.com/QuestaPorta

      or

      http://www.garageband.com/song?|pe1|S8LTM0LdsaSgYFKyZG8

      This performance by R.B.Craswell has been released under a Creative
      Commons Music Sharing Licence, with Terry Pratchett's full approval,
      and his thanks to the composer

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      23) TIM WHITE: ANOTHER OFFICIAL DISCWORLD ARTIST TO ENJOY

      Tim White, the artist who painted the cover pictures for New English
      Library's paperback editions of Dark Side of the Sun and Strata, is
      back on the internet. His new improved site includes seventeen pages
      of his cover art, plus a variety of lovely stuff for sale including
      large prints produced to order, cards, t-shirts, jewellery and 3-D
      items. The Dark Side picture is available as a signed print and as a
      card. Tim White also provided the original cover art for William
      Gibson's legendary novel Neuromancer, and for works by such SF and
      fantasy luminaries as Bob Shaw, Roger Zelazny, Alfred Bester, Diane
      Duane, Marion Zimmer Bradley, Brian Aldiss, Isaac Asimov, Robert
      Silverberg, Clive Barker, and Michael Moorcock, among others. Go
      take a look!

      http://www.tim-white.co.uk/

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      24) CONVENTION NEWS

      IRISH DISCWORLD CONVENTION SEEKS COMMITTEE MEMBERS

      Organisation of the first ever Irish DiscWorld Convention is
      "proceeding apace, but we've come up against some obstacles --
      namely, we're running out of people." The organisers (Brian, is that
      you?) want to hear from any interested parties who have experience
      in running a fan convention.

      http://idwcon_2009.livejournal.com/1109.html

      Come on, people, go for it -- my homeland deserves a Discworld
      convention! -- Ed.

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      25) PTERRY ON THE TUBE

      25.1 Here be a video from HarperCollins in which The Author
      discusses Unseen Academicals, the forthcoming Discworld novel:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Zppx684ET0

      [On the right of the page, you'll also find a number of interviews
      previously featured in this year's WOSSNAME, including ones with
      Mark Lawson and ones regarding Alzheimer's Disease -- Ed.]


      25.2 ...and a lovely short clip recorded at the 2008 DWcon for Between
      the Lines, in which Pterry talks about the evolution of Discworld,
      on the occasion of its 25th anniversary:

      "I started off by parodying existing writers good and bad, and after
      a few books I discovered the joy of plot..."

      "It's a curious thing - on Discworld, I write romances and police
      procedurals and murder mysteries, but because it's on Discworld they
      all become fantasies..."

      http://www.between-the-lines.co.uk/?p=215

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      26) A FACE FULL O' HEID, AND CENTREFOLDS: WHAT'S NOT TO LIKE?

      A review of The Illustrated Wee Free Men, by Annie Mac

      The Illustrated Wee Free Men
      Terry Pratchett, illustrated by Stephen Player
      HarperCollins 2008
      ISBN 978-0-06-134080-2

      Long ago, my best beloved showed me one of his most treasured
      childhood possessions: an old hardcover edition of The Wind in the
      Willows, illustrated by E.H. Shepard, that had been passed down
      through his family for years. It was in only fair condition because
      it had been read and re-read and handled and stared at and possibly
      chewed on by several generations of children, but it was a beautiful
      thing with an aura of continuity to it, a book that declared that it
      was here to stay and would carry on speaking to young readers
      through the ages. I'd never since come across any modern book that
      exuded that same air of cherished permanence -- until I read The
      Illustrated Wee Free Men.

      Minutes after I first opened and leafed through this book, I phoned
      and emailed dozens of friends and family in almost incoherent
      enthusiasm: "Instant children's classic! No child should be without
      it! No child of ANY age! Buy it for someone now now now!" And
      eventually I went back and read the book from cover to cover, and
      then said the same things again, with even more wibbling enthusiasm.
      That was some weeks ago, and I feel as passionate about it now as I
      did on that first day.

      The Illustrated Wee Free Men is far more than a mere reissue with
      added illustrations...far, far more. It's as much a graphic novel as
      it is an illustrated book, and is a work of art in which the visuals
      truly do enhance the story. Not only are there a vast number of
      different kinds of illustrations scattered throughout the text --
      out of a total of 250 pages in this edition (which is in an old-
      fashioned format, taller and wider than most text-only books), I
      counted only 61 pages that don't have *some* kind of enhancement --
      but here and there, in addition to the more traditional sorts of
      pictures, we find tiny Feegles wandering through the text, pointing
      at or poking at or even dislodging words and letters, in a way that
      makes them leap out of the pages, alive and breathing (and cussing),
      into the delighted reader's world.

      The images are lavish and evocative, ranging from pale, sepia-toned,
      ghostly impressions to Wyeth-like watercolour effects to full-on
      glossy panoramas full of deep, dramatic colours. Sometimes the text
      is incorporated into the illustrations, and sometimes the
      illustrations are part of the text. Player has further enhanced the
      visual experience by adding his own illustrations of things merely
      hinted at in the original text: for example, a step-by-step diagram
      of how Miss Tick's stealth hat operates, or a rendering of the
      *very* long legal document accusing the Nac Mac Feegle of various
      antisocial behaviours.

      Oh, and there are several fantastic articulated pages that utterly
      stun the eye. One of my favourites is the one of the dairy -- look
      at the page in place and it shows a peaceful scene of Tiffany alone
      with only the toad and her thoughts for company, but open the flap
      and you see the rest of the room peppered with Feegles everywhere.
      Marvellous!

      Stephen Player's Tiffany Aching seems to me to visually reference
      Lewis Carroll's Alice, but in a realistic, slightly dishevelled way
      that suggests that Alice would never have done anything as proactive
      as thwacking Jenny Green-Teeth with a frying pan (and certainly
      wouldn't have measured the pan first). Player's Tiffany is a real
      child, determination shining from her every captured pose...even
      though she also does fulfil Pratchett's suggestion of being little
      more than a way of moving those huge boots around.

      Player's Feegles might not appeal to everyone, but they definitely
      appeal to me. Make no mistake, I adore Paul Kidby's renderings of
      the Nac Mac Feegle (a print of Feeglespotting has pride of place on
      one of our bookshelves), and both artists capture the essence of our
      favourite mayhem-wreaking pictsies, but Stephen Player's versions
      amuse me because they show the Feegles as less like fairies gone
      wrong and more like Sauchiehall Street bottlers with extra added
      magical powers. They're tougher and stringier and often sporting
      dingy white Rab C. Nesbitt singlets in addition to their kilts; in
      contrast, though, Player's Fion is less Muriel Gray in combat boots
      than a self-important kelda-in-waiting who knows how her world works
      and will stand up to anyone to see tradition upheld. Ah well, twice
      as many fabulous Feegle interpretations canna' be a bad thing!

      Tiffany Aching is one of my best beloved Discworld characters, and
      Terry Pratchett has shown her and her world to us so brilliantly
      that I didn't think it was possible to improve on his descriptions
      in text and dialogue. It turns out that I was wrong.

      Buy this book. And keep it. And then pass it on to your children, so
      they can pass it on to *their* children. In an era of disposable
      things, The Illustrated Wee Free Men is a classic that will retain
      its value for generations. Crivens!

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      27) BLOG REVIEW OF THE FOLKLORE OF DISCWORLD

      The Folklore of Discworld by Terry Pratchett and Jacqueline Simpson
      By Nymeth

      "I was already familiar with many of the myths and legends that are
      alluded to in Discworld, but I was surprised to find out how much of
      what is in the books is not just a product of Terry Pratchett's
      wonderful imagination. Just like he understands people, he
      understands stories (and the two, of course, are more than a little
      related). And he knows how to use stories expertly. Of course, no
      writer makes everything up out of thin air, but knowing exactly what
      Terry Pratchett incorporated into his books made me appreciate
      Discworld even more..."

      http://tinyurl.com/5bbj25

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      28) REVIEW OF ONLY YOU CAN SAVE MANKIND ON TOR.COM

      The Johnny Maxwell series has only recently been released in the
      USA. Here is an interesting review of the first book, Only You Can
      Save Mankind:

      "What Johnny learns is that what you do in games is in a way always
      real, in that it is still you who did it. The aliens may not be real
      and really die, but you really experienced them dying and didn't
      think about it."

      http://www.tor.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=blog&id=6698

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      29) BLOG REVIEW OF THE TURTLE MOVES - BY ITS AUTHOR!

      From fantasybookcritic.blogspot.com

      "Terry Pratchett kept writing Discworld books, and I kept buying
      them, and I kept enjoying them. Every so often there'd be one where
      I'd think it was sub-par, that Pratchett was finally running out of
      steam, but then the next one would be brilliant—there were never
      two clunkers in a row."

      http://tinyurl.com/56x4lh

      The page also includes a special giveaway offer by The Turtle Moves!
      publishers BenBella, for North American residents only. The giveaway
      ends Tuesday, November 4, 2008, at 11:59AM PST.

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      30) IT'S ALL ABOUT THE BRAAAAINSSS

      Scott Kenemore, blogger and zombie aficionado, waxes lyrical about
      Reg Shoe:

      "One of my favorite zombies of all time -- up there with Bub from
      Day of the Dead and the Tarman Zombie from Return of the Living Dead
      -- is Reg Shoe from Terry Pratchett's awesome Discworld fantasy/
      satire novels..."

      http://tinyurl.com/6ycbz5

      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      End of Part 3, continued on Part 4 of 6.
      If you did not get all six parts, write: interact@...
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Copyright (c) 2008 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
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