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WOSSNAME - APRIL 2008 - PART 3 OF 5

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  • Not A Granny
    WOSSNAME -- MAY 2008 -- PART 3 OF 5 (continued) ... oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ====Part 3 - ...AND MORE...AND AROUND THE BU CAMPUS
    Message 1 of 2 , May 27, 2008
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      WOSSNAME -- MAY 2008 -- PART 3 OF 5 (continued)
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      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ====Part 3 - ...AND MORE...AND AROUND THE BU CAMPUS

      25) ANOTHER UNAUTHORISED BOOK ABOUT DISCWORLD
      26) AROUND THE BU CAMPUS
      27) HOW NOT TO GROK DISCWORLD
      28) NOT QUITE THE END

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      25) EEK! ANOTHER UNAUTHORISED BOOK ABOUT DISCWORLD

      The Turtle Moves! Discworld's Story Unauthorized:

      http://lwe.livejournal.com/13659.html

      "The Turtle Moves! will be out in August from BenBella Books, by the
      way. It's a sort of reader's guide to Terry Pratchett's long-running
      series."

      [It's a meme, I tells ya! -- Ed.]

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      26) AROUND THE BU CAMPUS

      1. SUITABLE FOR CHILDREN

      The Rear View column this week was written by Deborah Hope who opined
      that children these days would be better behaved if their parents read
      to them as she did to her own sons. She gives examples of books
      including "Terry Pratchett's trilogy for younger readers, 'Truckers,
      Diggers and Wings'(the boys would go on to read the two dozen or so
      Discworld series titles numerous times)."

      [Hope, Deborah. "A read can put things right." The Weekend Australian
      Review Section 26 Apr 2008, p. 40.]

      -- New Bruce

      2. THE GLOOPER IN ROUNDWORLD

      Engineer/economist Bill Phillips, a New Zealand native, built a
      machine to model the British economy in 1949. Although it was high-
      tech for its time, today the Phillips Machine seems a little nutty.
      What's odd about the machine is that it used water power —
      hydraulics — to model the flow of money through the British
      economy.

      http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/14816

      -- Jase

      3. WHAT'S IN A (DISCWORLD) NAME

      I don't want to make light of the crisis in Myanmar but I did smile
      when I heard on the news that the UN was bringing in supplies from
      Brindisi today.

      You can help here -- http://www.careaustralia.org.au/

      -- New Bruce

      4. LIBRARIANS EVOLVING!

      Mrs Peculiar:
      Ook ook ooook!
      http://tinyurl.com/3qb48s

      New Bruce:
      Showing off eh? Mrs Whitlow must be around.(He's taken his drawers
      off for Bealtain/Samhain I see).

      Someone else:
      I bet he's mastered the art of Blanky Zen and is wearing an invisible
      fluffy blanket! Hey, maybe this proves that if Homo sapiens sticks
      around for long enough, the species might become intelligent :D

      5. THE ECLIPSE CRUISE

      New Bruce:
      Soooo, anyone wanna go on a cruise?

      http://www.tinyurl.com.au/x.php?quc

      You'll see lots of The Sea and Little Fishes!

      Mrs Peculiar:
      Not to mention a MERE BALL OF FLAMING GAS that will have failed to have
      ILLUMINATED THE WORLD, at least for a few minutes...

      Jase:
      Not to mention a thing of mostly water, with a bit of carbon and a few
      other odds and ends, who has succeeded in illuminating the world just a
      little bit...

      [Ed. -- And so say all of us!]

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      27) THE COLOUR OF OOPS, OR HOW NOT TO GROK DISCWORLD

      And now we come to the, shall we say, unbelievers. One of WOSSNAME's
      newshounds sent me the following item some months ago; I'd originally
      decided not to reprint or link to it, but what with the theme of this
      month's editorial, I think this piece provides a reasonable
      opportunity to mock the afflic-, that is, to point out that not
      everyone has the right mindset to appreciate Discworld. Below is a
      review, published exactly two years ago in The Oxford Student, of a
      stage production of Wyrd Sisters. Not only did the reviewer
      completely fail to understand the true satirical nature of Wyrd
      Sisters, but she also fell over herself in an attempt to be
      scornfully clever, or cleverly scornful, or whatever it is that
      pretentious students in the Halls of Academia (MAY CONTAIN NUTS)
      think they have to do to look like a wys-ars -- which apparently
      includes an inability to proofread the title of her own review:

      A Prachett job
      By Alys Denby

      Wyrd-Sisters
      O'Reilly, 16 May - 20 May

      Perhaps it is just me being green in judgement but something makes me
      think it unlikely that a large proportion of O'Reilly theatregoers
      are under the age of seven. This view is apparently not shared by
      Meghna Jayanth who, in choosing to stage a production of Terry
      Pratchett's Wyrd Sisters must surely be attempting to appeal to
      this age group, that or trying to relive her own salad days.

      The play is essentially a puerile parody of Shakespeare's Macbeth
      with elements of King Lear and Hamlet thrown in for good measure. The
      megalomaniacal Duke Felmet (played by Rob Morgan) has usurped the
      good King Verence I and attempts to cement his rule by disposing of
      the king's rightful heir. His plan is complicated somewhat by the
      interference of the king's ghost, three witches and a band of
      travelling players.

      These tiresome events strut their hour upon the fantastical Discworld
      of the eponymous novel cycle whose popularity is as incomprehensible
      as Stephen Briggs' decision to adapt it for stage. The witches are
      characterised with bathetic realism, their only real power being the
      capacity of their comedy accents to slip seamlessly between
      Coronation Street and Ireland, with the exception of Claire Stevenson
      who plays Magrat Garlick and is actually from Belfast.

      Pratchett fans will recognise the narrator — Jayanth's own
      addition — who vocalises vast sections of the book's footnotes.
      This play, having as it does all the characteristics of a tale told
      by an idiot, is rescued from unwatchability by Morgan who portrays
      the oleaginous perversion of the Duke admirably.

      This is fortunate as the Duke's character is the only one that
      provides genuine humour in the play as a caricature of the spotty
      sexuality of a fourteen year-old dungeons and dragons enthusiast with
      a reassuringly postmodern touch. In all fairness to the Wyrd Sisters
      team, the job they make of this dreadful play is far from hamfisted
      and would probably delight a family at the Edinburgh fringe.

      I fear however that the travesty it makes of the bard may be an
      anathema to Oxford's more erudite theatregoer.

      --

      The original review can be seen online at:

      http://www.oxfordstudent.com/tt2006wk3/Drama/a_prachett_job_

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      28) ...AND IT'S NOT GOODNIGHT FROM HER YET

      And so we come to the *temporary* end. Stand by for the rest of your
      monthly WOSSNAME goodies, arriving in your Hex mailbox in a few days'
      time: Fernando, Weird Alice, and any late-breaking news that happens
      to show up. As always, I'd like to extend a huge thank-you to all the
      people who sent me news and links. In the meantime, enjoy your link
      clicks, save an orangutan, and don't forget to pre-order your copy of
      Nation...

      -- Annie Mac

      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

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      End of Part 3, continued on Part 4 of 5.
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      Copyright (c) 2008 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
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