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WOSSNAME -- SEPTEMBER 2007 -- PART 3 OF 8

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  • Not A Granny
    WOSSNAME -- SEPTEMBER 2007 -- PART 3 OF 8 (continued) ... oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo ====Part 3 - OFFICIAL AND OFFICIALLY UNOFFICIAL
    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 29, 2007
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      WOSSNAME -- SEPTEMBER 2007 -- PART 3 OF 8 (continued)
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      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      ====Part 3 - OFFICIAL AND OFFICIALLY UNOFFICIAL NEWS

      17) IT'S OFFICIAL! MAKING MONEY IS A BESTSELLER!
      18) UNOFFICIAL COMPANION PRESS RELEASE
      19) UNOFFICIAL COMPANION PRESS RELEASE COMPANION!
      20) SPEAKING OF PUBLISHERS: REAL IS DE WORDE

      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      17) MAKING MONEY: NUMBER ONE WITH A BANKNOTE

      Making Money takes the #1 spot on the London Times list on Sunday
      30th September! And in the USA, Making Money will debut at #4 on the
      New York Times Hardcover Fiction Bestseller List for 17th October.

      Making Money also stands on the following lists:

      USA Today (27/9/2007): #3 in hardcover fiction (#34 on the composite
      list of all fiction and nonfiction).

      Book Sense National Hardcover Fiction: #8

      Making Money is also now on seven of the eight regional Book Sense
      (independent) lists.

      Keep them tills a-ringing!

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      18) PRESS RELEASE: THE NEW UNOFFICIAL PTERRY COMPANION

      What links a launch party in the carpet department of Heal's
      Department Store, a writer who chose The Chrysler Building as his
      luxury on Desert Island Discs, and a Fantasy world that has led to
      40 million books being sold worldwide in 33 languages? The answer,
      of course, is Terry Pratchett.

      As the number two living British novelist in terms of sales (second
      only to J.K. Rowling), Terry Pratchett has produced a huge
      outpouring of novels – from the enormously successful, bestselling
      Discworld series, to the Tiffany Aching and Amazing Maurice book for
      children, and the much loved Johnny Maxwell books, and Bromeliad
      Trilogy – as well as graphic novels and short stories.

      But despite huge acclaim from adoring fans, and an OBE for services
      to literature awarded to Pratchett in 1998, the fact that his genre
      is fantasy – and comic fantasy to boot – has led some reviewers
      to be rather dismissive of his work, overlooking the interesting
      ideas of a writer with much to say about contemporary life and
      society.

      A new book, An Unofficial Companion to the Novels of Terry
      Pratchett, puts all that to rights. The Companion reveals a writer
      of great complexity, one whose rich work raises important issues
      about the real world set within a fantasy/comic environment. For
      example, seen in the light of the events of 9/11, the notion of who
      the hero is (in The Last Hero) takes on a whole new significance.
      Is it the professional hero, the obvious or oblivious hero, or the
      person who just wants to run away? Who really is the last hero?

      An Unofficial Companion is a fans' guide to everything Terry
      Pratchett has ever written. It contains plot lines and characters,
      articles on key themes and discussions of artwork, television
      adaptations, and his collaborative work with people such as Gray
      Jolliffe, Neil Gaiman, and Ian Stewart. Perhaps more importantly, as
      well as celebrating the inventiveness of Pratchett's work, the
      book also analyses the underlying meanings. Entries on Fantasy,
      Science Fiction, Fairy Tales and many others discuss the scientific,
      social and philosophical ideas underpinning Pratchett's
      narratives, highlighting his importance as a writer capable of
      engaging with complex themes from science to sexuality.

      Written with humour and a light touch – and containing
      unbelievable amounts of detail! - An Unofficial Companion is the
      definitive companion to Terry Pratchett's work. It will be
      essential reading for all Pratchett fans and for everyone who wants
      to both explore the allusions of his novels and appreciate the rich
      complexity of the writings of one of the world's greatest
      novelists.

      An Unofficial Companion to the Novels of Terry Pratchett
      Andrew M. Butler and others
      978-1-84645-001-3 hardback £25.00 * 978-1-84645-001-3 paperback
      £13.99
      Publication 22 November 2007

      For more information, please contact Sue Miller, Oxford Creative
      Marketing, on Tel: 01865 861669, or email:
      sue.miller@...

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      19) OFFICIALLY UNOFFICIALLY SPEAKING...

      An Official Companion to an Unofficial Companion
      by Andrew M. Butler

      One bright spring day a couple of years ago, Simon Mason at
      Greenwood Press invited me to edit An Unofficial Companion to the
      Novels of Terry Pratchett. Of course, there was already a companion
      on the market, the work of Stephen Briggs and Pratchett himself, but
      that was a few years out of date at the time. Obviously there was no
      point in just rewriting this – and not just for copyright reasons.
      I thought that the net needed to be cast wider to include the
      children's books and his collaborations, not to mention the books
      he wrote before the Discworld. Then there all were the short
      stories.

      Drawing up the list of entries, I realised that we could not deal
      with every single character, so I boiled it down to major
      protagonists and a number of recurring ones. Rincewind and Twoflower
      had to be included, and the Librarian, the witches (two maidens, the
      mother and the other one), the City Watch, a selection of the
      Wizards... I wanted an entry on each of the novels, to act as a kind
      of central thread through the Companion, as well as the comic books
      and television adaptations and plays and soundtracks and... Each of
      these needed entries. And both Simon Mason and I wanted juicier,
      meatier, longer essays as well – not just on groups of novels, but
      on themes: Pratchett says things about sexism, feminism, racism and
      politics which are worth examining.

      In thinking through the potential entries, I become aware that
      Pratchett's fictional worlds exist within a real world. (Well,
      real-ish). There are other fantasy novels, other comedies, other
      children's books. And whilst I could not hope to explain every
      single reference, he parodies or references pop music, plays, films,
      operas, musicals and a myriad other aspects of pop culture. I began
      to think of these as examples of white knowledge – probably
      misusing Pratchett's own term for stuff you know without ever
      actually really learning it.

      In putting the book together, I had two main problems – the fact
      that Pratchett kept producing new stuff and that I had to find ways
      of cramming more information in without the book bursting at the
      seams. I think there's probably enough material to fill a book
      four times the size – and I just read an article on Pratchett's
      novels which got me thinking we could also have had entries on this
      and that and this. That way lies madness, of course. Or a second
      edition. Which might be the same thing.

      But in the meantime here's a companion to the novels of Terry
      Pratchett and beyond. We hope that it's something you'd give to
      someone who is only just starting their journey through the
      Discworld as a guide, or that if you've read everything, there's
      something that will inspire you to go back and read the novels in a
      new light. I know it did for me, and I just reread everything.

      Editor's note: you can pre-order your copy at:

      http://www.greenwood.com/catalog/GWP001.aspx

      %%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%

      19) A REAL-LIFE WILLIAM DE WORDE...OR DIBBLER?

      Irvin S Cobb, journalist, writing about Charley Chapin, editor of
      the New York Evening World during the 1920s:

      'His idol, and the only one he worshiped except his own conceitful
      image, was the inky-nosed, nine-eyed, clay-footed god called News...

      'Chapin had dealt with flaring headlines so long that automatically
      he thought in headlines and unconsciously spoke in headlines.
      "Barton Currie," with the rubber transmitter still at his ear he
      would call across the city room, "take Johnny Haggerty off booth
      number two. 'Tiny Tot With Penny Clutched In Chubby Hand Dies Under
      Tram Before Mother's Eyes!' Rush along three sticks of it, will you,
      and make it snappy, Barton? We need something to brighten up the
      front page of the Home Edition with."

      'Without any affectation, he dealt conversationally in such copy-
      reader's stand-bys as "Probe", "Foe", "Rift", "Fray" and "Slay",
      "Dragnet", "Prey" and "Rack" and "Pact." Quite seriously he told me
      he rather liked a certain popular murderess of the moment because
      she had a nice short name, one that would fit into almost any top
      caption.'

      quoted from Exit Laughing, pp. 119, 140. Published in 1941 by
      Bobbs, Merrill & Co.

      originally posted at alt.books.pratchett by Shalom Septimus

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      End of Part 3 -- continued on Part 4 of 8.
      If you did not get all eight parts, write: interact@...
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      Copyright (c) 2007 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
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