Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

WOSSNAME -- JANUARY 2004 -- PART 1 OF 3

Expand Messages
  • JSCHAUM111@aol.com
    WOSSNAME Newsletter of the Klatchian Foreign Legion January 2004 (Volume 7, Issue 1) *********************************************************************
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 30, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      WOSSNAME
      Newsletter of the Klatchian Foreign Legion
      January 2004 (Volume 7, Issue 1)
      *********************************************************************
      WOSSNAME is a FREE publication for members of the
      worldwide Klatchian Foreign Legion and its affiliates,
      including the North American Discworld Society and other
      continental groups. Are you a member? Yes, if you sent in
      your name, country and e-mail address. Are there any dues? No.
      *********************************************************************
      Editor in Chief: Joseph Schaumburger
      Managing Editor: Annie Mac
      News Editor: Bethany Ayers
      Staff Writers: Lady Aranluc, Asti Osborn
      Book Reviews: Drusilla D'Afanguin
      Puzzle Editor: CatTigerLi
      Haiku Handmaiden: Kate Oneamus
      Emergency Staff: Jason Parlevliet,
      Nathan Clissold, Dylan Williams
      Art Director: Rhett Pennell
      World Membership Director: Becky Swaney
      Convention News Editor: Susan Fox-Davis
      Webmaster: Paul Wilkins, disk@...
      Copyright 2004 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      INDEX:

      ====Part 1

      1) FIRST REVIEW -- THE HAT FULL OF SKY
      2) AMAZON'S BLURB -- THE HAT FULL OF SKY
      3) HONORS FOR THE WEE FREE MEN
      4) SHADOWS OVER BAKER STREET -- A REVIEW

      ====Part 2

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      LETTERS FROM OUR READERS
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      5) CASTING THE DISCWORLD
      6) DISCWORLD SERIES GETTING DARKER
      7) FIRE THE PROOF-READER
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      KFL MEETS AROUND THE WORLD
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

      8) TANGOMEET AND ACCIDENTAL MELMEET

      ====Part 3

      9) THIS MONTH'S PUZZLE: THE FIFTH ELEPHANT
      10) NOT YOUR LONG-AWAITED DISC HOROSCOPE

      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      1) FIRST REVIEW -- THE HAT FULL OF SKY

      As we noted last month, Terry's new book,
      THE HAT FULL OF SKY: WEE FREE MEN 2
      is due out in May 2004, and due to the kindness of
      Terry's editor, Jennifer Brehl, at HarperCollins, we have
      obtained page proofs for a special advance review
      by our own Drusilla:

      Amazon US: US$ 16.99 Amazon price $11.89
      Hardcover 320 pages (25 May 2004) 
      Publisher: HarperCollins; ISBN: 0060586605
      US Audio Cassette (Abridged) $29.95 $20.97


      Amazon UK: GBP 12.99  Amazon  price: GBP 10.39
      Hardcover 320 pages (25 May 2004)
      Publisher: Doubleday; ISBN: 0385607369

      The book came today (well, as it's now 0435 here, I
      suppose it came yesterday!), but I didn't want to
      write until I'd read it...however, I've been reading
      it as sloooowly as I possibly could, in between
      making music -- at last -- on my finally-sorta-fixed
      synth and doing e-mails, because I wanted to make
      it last and last and last. Because in a way that's hard
      to describe, it might just be the most magical book
      I've ever read.

      It's Pratchett, quintessentially Pratchett. It's just as
      quintessentially a Discworld novel. It plainly and satisfyingly
      carries on the tale of Tiffany Aching, as begun in The
      Wee Free Men, which is a book I love dearly, a book
      that made me giggle and cheer, a book that affected me
      as all Discworld novels have, namely by brightening
      my reading time and filling my memories with light
      and making me nod with empathy at the writer's sharp
      yet canny understanding of human foibles and the nuts
      and bolts of human society.

      But The Hat Full Of Sky is something else again. As I
      read it I kept feeling the air thicken around me; I felt my
      inner-self breaking through veils of soft mist into places
      and pieces of my childhood. I felt the same kind of eerie
      yet friendly, electric magic that I used to feel when I read
      Ray Bradbury books as a young girl.

      Sure, there are familiar characters here, and there are
      passages that make me snarfle -- especially the
      ones involving the Nac Mac Feegle - but somehow
      Pratchett has taken these familiar elements and spun
      them around and sent them off in a new direction
      altogether.

      And there is darkness there as well, a very potent and
      uncompromising darkness, but it's not the darkness of
      Carpe Jugulum or Hogfather or Night Watch, it's more
      the darkness of true monsters creeping up in the
      mist -- again, like Bradbury.

      I haven't quite finished The Hat Full Of Sky yet; I've stopped,
      for the moment, at what seems to be just before the big
      climax, because I don't want this first reading to end quite
      yet. But I can give my verdict nonetheless: this is no typical
      "children's book," but it does make me *feel* like a child. The
      sort of child who feels the magic in dawn mist. The sort of
      child who collects fireflies in a jar of an early summer's
      evening and then hides under the bedcovers to read by
      firefly-light, because that sort of light is full of secrets and
      knowings and it keeps away the *real* darkness. What a
      wonderful, wonderful book. And blimey, I think I've just
      written my review of it, haven't I?

      P.S. When Steven came home and picked the book up, the
      first thing he said was, "Ooh, I like the cover!" Really.
      This is noteworthy due to the Great DW Covers Debate
      that continues to rage amongst the fans of The Master --
      you may recall that I am sooo not a fan of the late Josh
      Kirbymayherestinpeace, and hated the USA covers just
      as much (Paul Kidby being, like, my Hero, though I think
      he's in editorial, erm, publisherial{1} shackles of late {2}),
      but the USA cover for The Wee Free Men was rather
      charming, and this one continues the stylised Feegle
      theme nicely. They're such a restful shade of blue :D

      ----------------------------------
      {1} Wheee! Pass me another box of Instant Neologisms(TM)
      please...
      {2} Hmmm, I think I'll write a piece about the evolution of
      DW cover art for next month's WOSSNAME, what do
      you think of that? (Ed: Go for it!)

      -- Drusilla D'Afanguin
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      2) AMAZON'S BLURB -- THE HAT FULL OF SKY

      For those who like a bit more detail, here's what's on the
      US Amazon webpage: (not exactly spoilers, but purists
      might want to avert their eyes:)

      Book Description:

      The Heroine: Tiffany Aching, incipient witch and cheese
      maker extraordinaire. Once saved world from Queen of the
      Elves. Is about to discover that battling evil monarchs is
      child's play compared to mortal combat with a Hiver (see below).
      At eleven years old, is boldest heroine ever to have confronted
      the Forces of Darkness while armed with a frying pan.

      The Threat: A Hiver, insidious disembodied presence drawn
      to powerful magic. highly dangerous, frequently lethal. Cannot
      be stopped with iron or fire. Its target: Tiffany Aching (see above).

      The Nac Mac Feegle: A.k.a. the Wee Free Men. Height:
      six inches. Color: blue. Famed for drinking, stealing, and
      fighting. Will attack anything larger than themselves. Members
      include: Rob Anybody, Daft Wullie, and Awfully Wee Billy
      Bigchin. Allies to Tiffany Aching (see above).
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      3) HONORS FOR THE WEE FREE MEN

      Terry's agent Colin reports:

      Anne Hoppe at HarperCollins has sent me an email
      listing all the honours that The Wee Free Men has
      received in the US, and I thought it would be of interest
      to you. Here's what she wrote:-
      ------------
      We're just through with the American Library Association
      Midwinter conference here, making it an excellent time
      to bring you up-to-date on all the year-end-type-honors
      The Wee Free Men has accrued in the US.
      A very nice collection!

      *An ALA [American Library Association] Notable Book
      *An ALA Best Book for Young Adults
      *A Horn Book Fanfare Title of Best Books of 2003
      *A Kirkus 2003 Editor’s Choice
      *A School Library Journal Best Book of the Year
      *A Parenting Book of Year Award-winner
      *A Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books Blue Ribbon Book
      *A New York Public Library 100 Titles for Reading and Sharing book
      Parent’s Guide to Children’s Media, Inc: “Recognizes
      achievement in children’s books 2003”

      ... plus starred reviews in Horn Book, Kirkus, School
      Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, Kliatt

      -- Colin Smythe
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      4) SHADOWS OVER BAKER STREET -- A REVIEW

      Edited by Michael Reaves and John Pelan
      Published by Ballantine Books - Del Rey, New York
      $23.95 446 pages Copyright 2003

      When Grampa Joe gave me this book for Christmas,
      I was dubious of its merit. A series of short stories in
      which Conan Doyle's world of Sherlock Holmes meets
      Lovecraft's world of Cthulhu can go wrong in so many
      ways. After all, how can the logical world of Holmes
      possibly combine with the eldritch world of the Cthulhu
      mythos? And what does it have to with Terry Pratchett?

      To my astonishment, I found that a book called the
      Necrotelicomnicon is featured in both Equal Rites
      and Moving Pictures. An outer-dimensional monster
      called Yob Soddoth is also in Moving Pictures. And
      of course, you remember the unfortunate Mr. Hong,
      owner of the short-lived Three Jolly Luck Take-Away
      Fish Bar, which was built on the site of the old
      temple on Dagon Street.

      The Holmes references are a bit more obscure. There
      is, for example, a group called the Cable Street
      Particulars in Maskerade and, of course, the new
      home of the Watch is in Pseudopolis Yard. (Ed:
      Anyone spotted any other Lovecraftian or Holmes
      allusions?)

      But I am pleased to say that the writers of this anthology
      have handled this mishmosh with sensitivity, remaining true
      to the original characters while creating a pleasing union
      of worlds. Not only were the stories well crafted, but it was
      great fun to "spot the references".

      A great book for fans of Holmes and/or The Dark Elder Gods.

      -- Asti Osborn
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      If you did not get all 3 parts, write: jschaum111@...
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      End of Part 1, says my computer -- continued on Part 2 of 3


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.