Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

WOSSNAME -- JUNE 2003 -- PART 1 OF 3

Expand Messages
  • JSCHAUM111@aol.com
    WOSSNAME Newsletter of the Klatchian Foreign Legion June 2003 (Volume 6, Issue 6) *********************************************************************
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 29, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      WOSSNAME
      Newsletter of the Klatchian Foreign Legion
      June 2003 (Volume 6, Issue 6)
      *********************************************************************
      WOSSNAME is a FREE publication for members of the
      worldwide Klatchian Foreign Legion and its affiliates,
      including the North American Discworld Society and other
      continental groups. Are you a member? Yes, if you sent
      in your name and e-mail address. Are there any dues? No.
      *********************************************************************
      Editor in Chief: Joseph Schaumburger
      Managing Editor: Annie Mac
      News Editor: Bethany Ayers
      Staff Writers: Lady Aranluc
      Puzzle Editor: CatTigerLi
      Limericks Mistress: Drusilla D'Afanguin
      Haiku Handmaiden: Kate Oneamus
      Emergency Staff: Jason Parlevliet,
      Nathan Clissold, Dylan Williams
      Art Director: Rhett Pennell
      World Membership Director: Becky Swaney
      Convention News Editor: Susan Fox-Davis
      Webmaster: Paul Wilkins, disk@...
      Copyright 2003 by Klatchian Foreign Legion
      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
      INDEX:

      ====Part 1

      1) MONSTROUS REGIMENT: A REVIEW
      2) WOSSNAME APPOINTS MANAGING EDITOR
      3) TERRY AND THE WEE FREE MEN
      4) ANOTHER FEW WORDS FROM THE MASTER

      ====Part 2

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      LETTERS FROM OUR READERS
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      5) PONDER VS. POTTER CORRECTED
      6) A DWARF COMPLAINT FROM ICELAND
      7) DISCWORLD MUGS AND ALE TO FILL THEM WITH
      8) MORT IN CANADA

      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      KFL REPORTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD
      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
      9) LOONIEMEET, AUSTRALIA

      ====Part 3

      10) YOUR DISCWORLD HOROSCOPE
      11) PUZZLE: INTERESTING TIMES
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      1) MONSTROUS REGIMENT: REVIEW

      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
      US Publisher: HarperCollins Pubdate:October 2003
      List Price: USD 24.95 Amazon Price: USD 17.47
      Pages: 320 Hardcover ISBN 006001315X
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
      UK Publisher: Doubleday Pubdate: 2 October 2003
      List Price: GBP 17.99 Amazon.UK Price: 12.59
      Pages: 329 Hardcover ISBN 0385603401
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      Terry Pratchett's latest Discworld novel, Monstrous Regiment, is
      a Saga of Pride, Passione, Bad Foode and Spinne Doctoring in a
      Worlde Gone Madde.

      It's also a stirring tale of mistaken identities and misplaced
      loyalties and what it *really* means to be a Big Girl's Blouse in
      the company of rough, tough Men of War.

      But mostly, it's a story about socks.

      Monstrous Regiment takes place in the bantam (for which read
      small and badly-organised but insanely proud and aggressive,
      and always trying to sink its spurs into anything vaguely near
      the henhouse) country of Borogravia, a morose, grimly Slavonic
      nation ruled by an ancient widowed Duchess who hasn't been
      seen in public for thirty years. Borogravia is also the bailiwick of
      the smallish god Nuggan, who was last seen being socially
      excluded by the bigger cheeses of Cori Celesti in The Last Hero,
      and no wonder - his attitude to godding it seems to be "I may
      not be the most powerful or fashionable of deities, I may not have
      a big sphere of influence, but I can sure make life bloody
      miserable for the worshippers I *do* have," so the Book of Nuggan
      grows constantly thicker with an ever more capricious list of
      Abominations: chocolate, garlic, mushrooms, jigsaw puzzles, ears,
      babies, the colour blue...and to complicate matters further, Nuggan
      also Abominates the recently installed Clacks towers. Hmm, did
      I mention that we can assume that they were installed by Ankh-Morpork
      interests? Oops. Bad move, Nuggan.

      Into this repressive stew comes Polly Perks, a dangerously
      modern-minded innkeeper's daughter who decides to cut off her
      hair, disguise herself (badly) as a young man, and join the army.
      At first, her only reason for doing this is in the hopes of tracking
      down her simple-minded, gentle brother Paul, also a soldier; not
      only did she promise always to look after him, but she needs to
      make sure he's safe and sound because it's the only way she'll be
      able to carry on running the family pub once their father dies.
      (Did I mention that Nuggan Abominates women owning
      property? - or wearing trousers? - or learning to write? - or...) But
      once she's scammed her way into the Tenth Foot, also known
      as The Ins-and-Outs or the jolly old Cheesemongers, and found
      herself in the company of a gaggle of "fellow" recruits who *also*
      need looking after and a big, bad, crusty sergeant who keeps
      giving her the dirtiest jobs, Polly - or Oliver - is drawn into
      bigger issues. And being a determined sort of girl, you can be sure
      she meets them like a man.

      Although Monstrous Regiment is a stand-alone novel, it's very
      much a full part of the Discworld canon, far closer to The Fifth
      Elephant than to The Wee Free Men, and features the active
      presence of some familiar A-M faces throughout. There are the
      usual satirical moments and silly moments, and the trademark
      Pratchett snook-cocking and blasting of targets, but on the whole
      it's a more serious book than the earlier Discworld novels, and I
      for one don't mind that at all. It is this reviewer's opinion that
      both the author and the Discly nations themselves have evolved
      and become more mature and less slapstick, and rightly so, because
      there's only so much slapstick one can tolerate before boredom sets
      in. But Terry Pratchett's characters never become less than fascinating,
      and Monstrous Regiment marches along in fine hup-two time to
      its delightfully bizarre climax. I'd give it a Croix de Guerre; you
      can dance to it!

      Did I mention the socks? It really, really is about socks...:-)

      -- Drusilla D'Afanguin

      Editor's Note: Yes, I have seen the covers and in my opinion
      the US cover is more original. The UK cover seems to be another
      version of the stock WW2 photo "Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima,"
      most recently used right after 9/11 to illustrate policemen and
      firemen raising the flag at Ground Zero. Some may disagree,

      -- Joe Schaumburger
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      2) WOSSNAME APPOINTS MANAGING EDITOR

      WOSSNAME is pleased to announce that Annie Mac of
      Australia has been appointed as Managing Editor. A long-time
      DW fan, Annie has also lived in Ireland, the USA, and England,
      and has impressive editing credentials.
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      3) TERRY AND THE WEE FREE MEN

      In a reply to Marco Villalta in alt.fan.pratchett, Terry writes:

      I'm not going to pretend I remember *that* much from when I was
      nine years old, but what I do remember suggests that it is not at
      all implausible. And one of my cousins' daughter, age seven, has
      a way of reasoning and wording herself that beats quite a bit.

      If we take as givens that Tiffany is naturally intelligent and
      *something like* an only child (her older sisters are old enough not to
      be natural playmates, so she spends a lot of time in her own company )
      and lives in a society where kids above the age of a toddler are treated
      as small adults, and has escaped the horror of the school yard , which
      teaches children to be kids, and doesn't have TV and the other social
      pressures designed to turn her mind to mush, then there's nothing
      amazing about her. She also has been given a lot of responsibility for
      something important to the farm, and that accelerates mental maturity, I
      suggest.

      I meet girls like her at schools and signings -- they tend to be
      readers, they're as grave as Queen Victoria, but they are socially
      intelligent enough not to be a kid that gets picked on. But many of
      them have been, for one reason or another, educated at home.

      Finally, she's a witch, and a heroine. She *is* going to be brighter
      than other kids.

      Don't take my word for it -- I 've had a nice e-mail from a Brownie Pack
      of nine-year-old girls thanking me for writing a proper nine-year-old
      girl . They've sent me a scarf, which I guess makes me a Brownie:-)

      Incidentally -- to the thread in general -- deus ex machina, by
      tradition, means something produced at the last minute to make a plot
      work. Tiffany is bright from the word go, and throughout the book
      develops powers which are signalled right at the start.

      -- Terry Pratchett
      ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

      4) ANOTHER FEW WORDS FROM THE MASTER

      AFPer: Incidentally, do you have strong opinions about
      the meanings of "alternate" and "alternative"? 

      TP: Yes. I think that pedants should be alternately ignored
      and flamed, unless there is a better alternative

      -- (Terry Pratchett and an AFPer, alt.fan.pratchett)
      oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
      If you did not get all 3 parts, write: jschaum111@...
      ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
      End of Part 1, says my computer -- continued on Part 2 of 3




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.