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Re: [WKneedle] Re: celtic embroidery?

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  • Finnseach de Locheil/Judith Winner
    ... [...] You might check with Lacis (lacis.com). I think that s where I had bought my copies. Finnseach Dernehealde, Midrealm -- I m buying this fleece/fiber
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 1, 2009
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      >> Greetings Arianna,
      >>
      >> To answer your question regarding Celtic embroidery and sources, Master
      >> Gerald of Ipsley and Master Robert of Coldcastle wrote two books on this
      >> subject:
      >>
      >> Celtic Embroidery and Celtic design, pattern & color
      [...]

      You might check with Lacis (lacis.com). I think that's where I had bought my copies.

      Finnseach
      Dernehealde, Midrealm
      --
      "I'm buying this fleece/fiber now in case I have an emergency... you know,
      sickness, flood, injury, mosquito infestations, not enough chocolate in the
      house, it's Tuesday, I need it for my research project..." ;)
    • lilinah@earthlink.net
      ... The answer rather depends on a few things: 1.) What you mean by Celtic . The Celts started out in far eastern Europe and gradually made their way
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 2, 2009
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        arianna wrote:
        > Can anyone point me to resources for celtic embroidery??

        The answer rather depends on a few things:

        1.) What you mean by "Celtic".

        The Celts started out in far eastern Europe and gradually made their
        way westward. Remains of their culture - rather lovely things - have
        been found in Switzerland, Austria, and points east. And there are
        Celtic cultures still today in Spain, France, Wales, Scotland, and
        Ireland.

        So do you mean:
        --- a.) Celtic cultures in general?
        --- b.) From a particular time period?
        --- c.) From a specific Celtic culture?

        2.) Whether you want actual historic Celtic embroidery or SCA-Celtic
        embroidery.

        --- a.) Actual historic Celtic embroidery
        There's little actual embroidery surviving from within any of the
        Celtic cultures i know of. Perhaps someone here can point you to some
        genuine historical resources.

        --- b.) SCA-Celtic embroidery

        There's a lot of what i'm calling SCA-Celtic embroidery - or at least
        books with Celtic designs adapted or adaptable for embroidery.

        For starters, there are some inexpensive books published by Dover
        Press that have charts of patterns taken from mostly Irish and
        Insular art.

        For Celtic (usually means British Isles and Irish) designs see:
        a complete list of Aidan Meehan's excellent books:
        http://www.amazon.com/Aidan-Meehans-Books/lm/R2XNADNKJ5BT9Z/ref=cm_lmt_srch_f_2_rsrssi0
        which demonstrate how to create various types of Celtic patterns and
        adopt them to various shapes.

        For those inexpensive books published by Dover, go to Amazon, in the
        Search box select "Books" from the drop down menu, and type in Celtic
        Dover into the next box. You'll get more than those published by
        Dover, but most are.

        Similarly, type in Celtic Embroidery, and you'll find many books with
        Celtic (i.e., mostly Irish and Insular) designs adapted for
        embroidery (along with some other unrelated stuff).

        The two books (Celtic Embroidery and Celtic Design, Pattern & Color)
        by Master Gerald of Ipsley and Master Robert of Coldcastle, include
        patterns from similar Irish and Insular sources and others, such as
        stonework and metalwork.

        Since there's little to no surviving embroidery, their premise is
        that if there was embroidery the designs would be similar to those
        found on other items from the culture. I bought their two Celtic
        books after taking their classes a Pennsic a couple years ago. Fun
        enjoyable classes. But as wonderful as their stuff is, little is
        taken from textile sources.

        They have now expanded into "Viking" design - actually Scandinavian -
        most Scandinavian stuff is not from the Viking period which was a
        limited time period.

        Hmmm, odd, i can't find their website now. I did find their two
        Celtic books for sale at Pot Boiler Press:
        http://potboilerpress.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=7

        Here's a description of one of them, taken from the West Kingdom
        Needleworkers Guild website
        http://wkneedle.bayrose.org/booklist/Book-EmbGen.html
        > Celtic Embroidery
        > Hubbell, Gerald & Robert Kalthoff (SCA: Gerald of Ipsley & Robert
        >of Coldcastle)
        > self-published, May 2001
        > With an eye toward determining what would have been done, they
        >review all the extent items, designs and drawings. From that they
        >suggest methods used and colors. Many drawings are provided for your
        >use as well as the underlying theories behind the drawings. SB
        > Intermediate

        For views of the covers see:
        --- Celtic Embroidery
        http://www.librarything.com/work/827229

        --- Celtic Design, Pattern & Color
        http://www.librarything.com/work/5242881
        --
        Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
        the persona formerly known as Anahita
      • lilinah@earthlink.net
        Re Master Gerald of Ipsley and Master Robert of Coldcastle and their two books (Celtic Embroidery and Celtic Design, Pattern & Color), here are links to their
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 2, 2009
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          Re Master Gerald of Ipsley and Master Robert of Coldcastle and their
          two books (Celtic Embroidery and Celtic Design, Pattern & Color),
          here are links to their apparently defunct website which was:
          http://malverack.com/

          Via the magic of the Wayback Machine, you can see what they posted
          about "Celtic Embroidery",:
          http://web.archive.org/web/20041014231348/malverack.com/gallery_2/celtic_art.htm

          For a little on "Celtic Design", see:
          http://web.archive.org/web/20050523214824/www.malverack.com/gallery_2/celtic_design.htm

          Obviously do not try to order the books from this archived version of
          their missing website, which seems to have gone away after 2005.

          And their bios on line until the end of 2005:
          http://web.archive.org/web/20031030011025/www.malverack.com/bios.htm

          I hope this is helpful.
          --
          Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
          the persona formerly known as Anahita
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