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RE: [WKneedle] Re: Class: Recreating late 16th-early 17th c. woman's jacket

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  • Chiara Francesca
    That was a great read! Thank you so much for share that with us. I really want to make a road trip to the Plimoth plantation as they have actual Elizabethan
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 25 3:24 PM
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      That was a great read!

      Thank you so much for share that with us. I really want to make a road trip to the Plimoth plantation as they have actual Elizabethan and Jacobean gloves in house and I would love to just sit and get to know every millimeter of them. :)

      Maybe we can all plan a trip out that way this summer. I do have a couple of pairs of gloves to deliver to them :D


      Chiara Francesca
      « Ehi Prof.! Che cosa facciamo stasera?»
      « Quello che facciamo tutte le sere, Mignolo: tentare di conquistare il mondo! »
      (hint: italian)

      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: WKneedle@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WKneedle@yahoogroups.com] On
      > Behalf Of lilinah@...
      > Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2009 1:01 PM
      > To: WKneedle@yahoogroups.com; ClothiersGuild@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [WKneedle] Re: Class: Recreating late 16th-early 17th c.
      > woman's jacket
      >
      > I attended the lecture "The Plimoth Jacket - A Paradise in Silk and
      > Gold" given by Tricia Wilson Nguyen on Saturday, April 18th, at Needle
      > in a Haystack in Alameda.
      >
      > This is the much blogged about, and almost ill-fated, reproduction of a
      > 1620s era embroidered English woman's waistcoat, embellished with
      > coiling patterns, flowers, and insects in gold and silk. I love these
      > coats, although i don't have a persona who'd wear them.
      >
      > It was great to see the slides of several existing jackets and learn
      > how the project was planned and carried out. Those of us there also got
      > to sew gold spangles onto the coif and forehead cloth - so we could
      > hold in our hands and see the amazing work. This project actually saved
      > a silk thread manufacturer (for which we should be grateful) and
      > resulted in the commercial production of reproduction threads that
      > blend silk with silver or gold threads (i've got to go back and buy
      > some) and some wonderful gold threads reproduced in a more period
      > fashion than many commonly available.
      >
      > Of great value (especially to us in the SCA) was learning how they
      > recreated the pattern through an analysis of existing embroidered items
      > - to which they were given access by the curator at the V&A, how
      > commercial/professional embroiderers' workshops worked, and the
      > repeated use of prepared pattern grids. And it was heartening to learn
      > how people in the SCA and our form of "experimental archaeology" was
      > useful. In fact, while the American museum community at first was
      > skeptical of the project, a curator at the V&A in England was a great
      > help, and the project has been so successful in ways they did not first
      > imagine, that the American museum community is now very interested in
      > and supportive of it.
      >
      > And it was exciting to learn about plans for two books, one to be a
      > coffee-table art book on this type of embroidery and the items adorned
      > with it, the other with detailed information about the stitches used,
      > threads, and more of interest to embroiderers.
      >
      >
      > There was also some more inside information about the changes at
      > Plimoth Plantation which almost killed the jacket project, how the
      > project was saved, and what is going on with it now.
      >
      > Also, we learned that the Layton jacket has been removed from display
      > at the V&A because it is suffering from deterioration due to being on
      > display so long, and when it may go back up, if ever, is uncertain.
      >
      > Some of the information about the project is at:
      > http://www.thistle-threads.com/blog
      >
      > -------
      > Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
      > the persona formerly known as Anahita
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > ==================(|) __--__--__--__--__--
      >
      > Needlework articles and information about the Guild:
      > http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle
      >
      > ==================(|) --__--__--__--__--__
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
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