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Class: Recreating late 16th-early 17th c. woman's jacket

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  • lilinah@earthlink.net
    ... The Plimoth Jacket - A Paradise in Silk and Gold Tricia Wilson Nguyen Saturday, April 18th 5:30 pm - 7:30 pm $35 Currently Dr. Tricia Wilson Nguyen is
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 11, 2009
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      Needle in a Haystack, the embroidery store in Alameda, is sponsoring a class that may be of interest to listees:

      --- Begin Blurb ---

      The Plimoth Jacket - A Paradise in Silk and Gold
      Tricia Wilson Nguyen
      Saturday, April 18th
      5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
      $35

      Currently Dr. Tricia Wilson Nguyen is leading a challenging reproduction project for Plimoth Planation, a living history museum interpreting the 1627 settlement in Massachusetts. The project is charged with fabricating a 1620's era embroidered English woman's waistcoat. Embellished with coiling stems of gold and silk flowers, the waistcoat has provided a unique opportunity to research and manufacture threads which have disappeared from our lexicon as well as provide light on the professional workshop that produced the objects.

      Tricia's talk will go through the process used to reproduce the waistcoat from deducing the embroidery pattern from the existing jacket, producing the metallic lace for the edgings, reproducing the gold wrapped threads, figuring out the stitches and progression used on each motif and a host of other fascinating topics. The lecture will be peppered with copious photos from research on the existing historic jackets. She has been able to closely examine six of the extant embroideries, providing a unique close look at how masters and apprentices worked together to fabricate the pieces.

      Tricia will be bringing the companion coif and forehead cloth which are in process to show as well as video of the silk lining weaving and spangle making. You can read more about the project on the popular blog at http://www.thistle-threads.com/blog

      --- End Blurb ---

      Less SCA-period, but also possibly of interest is another class:
      Sampler Design Lecture
      Tricia Wilson Nguyen
      Friday, April 17th
      6:30 pm - 9:30 pm
      $45

      If you're interested, you can read more about the classes:
      http://www.needlestack.com/classes.html

      And sign up and pay on the website:
      http://www.needlestack.com/WebStore/classes.html
      or phone or drop in the shop.

      Needle in a Haystack
      1533 Webster St
      Alameda CA 94501

      Phone: 510-522-0404

      -------
      Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
      the persona formerly known as Anahita
    • lilinah@earthlink.net
      I attended the lecture The Plimoth Jacket - A Paradise in Silk and Gold given by Tricia Wilson Nguyen on Saturday, April 18th, at Needle in a Haystack in
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 25, 2009
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        I attended the lecture "The Plimoth Jacket - A Paradise in Silk and Gold" given by Tricia Wilson Nguyen on Saturday, April 18th, at Needle in a Haystack in Alameda.

        This is the much blogged about, and almost ill-fated, reproduction of a 1620s era embroidered English woman's waistcoat, embellished with coiling patterns, flowers, and insects in gold and silk. I love these coats, although i don't have a persona who'd wear them.

        It was great to see the slides of several existing jackets and learn how the project was planned and carried out. Those of us there also got to sew gold spangles onto the coif and forehead cloth - so we could hold in our hands and see the amazing work. This project actually saved a silk thread manufacturer (for which we should be grateful) and resulted in the commercial production of reproduction threads that blend silk with silver or gold threads (i've got to go back and buy some) and some wonderful gold threads reproduced in a more period fashion than many commonly available.

        Of great value (especially to us in the SCA) was learning how they recreated the pattern through an analysis of existing embroidered items - to which they were given access by the curator at the V&A, how commercial/professional embroiderers' workshops worked, and the repeated use of prepared pattern grids. And it was heartening to learn how people in the SCA and our form of "experimental archaeology" was useful. In fact, while the American museum community at first was skeptical of the project, a curator at the V&A in England was a great help, and the project has been so successful in ways they did not first imagine, that the American museum community is now very interested in and supportive of it.

        And it was exciting to learn about plans for two books, one to be a coffee-table art book on this type of embroidery and the items adorned with it, the other with detailed information about the stitches used, threads, and more of interest to embroiderers.

        There was also some more inside information about the changes at Plimoth Plantation which almost killed the jacket project, how the project was saved, and what is going on with it now.

        Also, we learned that the Layton jacket has been removed from display at the V&A because it is suffering from deterioration due to being on display so long, and when it may go back up, if ever, is uncertain.

        Some of the information about the project is at:
        http://www.thistle-threads.com/blog

        -------
        Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
        the persona formerly known as Anahita
      • Chiara Francesca
        That was a great read! Thank you so much for share that with us. I really want to make a road trip to the Plimoth plantation as they have actual Elizabethan
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 25, 2009
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          That was a great read!

          Thank you so much for share that with us. I really want to make a road trip to the Plimoth plantation as they have actual Elizabethan and Jacobean gloves in house and I would love to just sit and get to know every millimeter of them. :)

          Maybe we can all plan a trip out that way this summer. I do have a couple of pairs of gloves to deliver to them :D


          Chiara Francesca
          « Ehi Prof.! Che cosa facciamo stasera?»
          « Quello che facciamo tutte le sere, Mignolo: tentare di conquistare il mondo! »
          (hint: italian)

          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: WKneedle@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WKneedle@yahoogroups.com] On
          > Behalf Of lilinah@...
          > Sent: Saturday, April 25, 2009 1:01 PM
          > To: WKneedle@yahoogroups.com; ClothiersGuild@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [WKneedle] Re: Class: Recreating late 16th-early 17th c.
          > woman's jacket
          >
          > I attended the lecture "The Plimoth Jacket - A Paradise in Silk and
          > Gold" given by Tricia Wilson Nguyen on Saturday, April 18th, at Needle
          > in a Haystack in Alameda.
          >
          > This is the much blogged about, and almost ill-fated, reproduction of a
          > 1620s era embroidered English woman's waistcoat, embellished with
          > coiling patterns, flowers, and insects in gold and silk. I love these
          > coats, although i don't have a persona who'd wear them.
          >
          > It was great to see the slides of several existing jackets and learn
          > how the project was planned and carried out. Those of us there also got
          > to sew gold spangles onto the coif and forehead cloth - so we could
          > hold in our hands and see the amazing work. This project actually saved
          > a silk thread manufacturer (for which we should be grateful) and
          > resulted in the commercial production of reproduction threads that
          > blend silk with silver or gold threads (i've got to go back and buy
          > some) and some wonderful gold threads reproduced in a more period
          > fashion than many commonly available.
          >
          > Of great value (especially to us in the SCA) was learning how they
          > recreated the pattern through an analysis of existing embroidered items
          > - to which they were given access by the curator at the V&A, how
          > commercial/professional embroiderers' workshops worked, and the
          > repeated use of prepared pattern grids. And it was heartening to learn
          > how people in the SCA and our form of "experimental archaeology" was
          > useful. In fact, while the American museum community at first was
          > skeptical of the project, a curator at the V&A in England was a great
          > help, and the project has been so successful in ways they did not first
          > imagine, that the American museum community is now very interested in
          > and supportive of it.
          >
          > And it was exciting to learn about plans for two books, one to be a
          > coffee-table art book on this type of embroidery and the items adorned
          > with it, the other with detailed information about the stitches used,
          > threads, and more of interest to embroiderers.
          >
          >
          > There was also some more inside information about the changes at
          > Plimoth Plantation which almost killed the jacket project, how the
          > project was saved, and what is going on with it now.
          >
          > Also, we learned that the Layton jacket has been removed from display
          > at the V&A because it is suffering from deterioration due to being on
          > display so long, and when it may go back up, if ever, is uncertain.
          >
          > Some of the information about the project is at:
          > http://www.thistle-threads.com/blog
          >
          > -------
          > Urtatim (that's err-tah-TEEM)
          > the persona formerly known as Anahita
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
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          > http://www.bayrose.org/wkneedle
          >
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