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question re: Holbein stitch

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  • Joan Hall
    I am starting a linen blackwork needlebook from a kit, and I have a question: it tells you to use Holbein (double running) stitch. However, since the piece
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 1, 2007
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      I am starting a linen blackwork needlebook from a kit, and I have a question: it tells you to use Holbein (double running) stitch. However, since the piece will be lined and the back of the work will never be seen, is there any compelling reason to use Holbein instead of simple backstitch? (By the way, in case it matters, this is for my own mundane use - I think blackwork is way OOP for my 12th c. persona.)

      Joan the Harper



      Joan Hall
      http://www.winecountryharpist.com




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Susan B. Farmer
      ... I believe that you d use much less thread ..... but I m not certain. jerusha (in Meridies) ... Susan Farmer sfarmer@goldsword.com University of Tennessee
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 1, 2007
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        Quoting Joan Hall <joan_the_harpist1119@...>:

        > I am starting a linen blackwork needlebook from a kit, and I have a
        > question: it tells you to use Holbein (double running) stitch.
        > However, since the piece will be lined and the back of the work will
        > never be seen, is there any compelling reason to use Holbein
        > instead of simple backstitch? (By the way, in case it matters,
        > this is for my own mundane use - I think blackwork is way OOP for
        > my 12th c. persona.)
        >

        I believe that you'd use much less thread ..... but I"m not certain.

        jerusha (in Meridies)
        -----
        Susan Farmer
        sfarmer@...
        University of Tennessee
        Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
        http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
      • Sabrina de la Bere
        What makes Blackwork look good is the crisp black thread against the white ground fabric. If you do back stitch, you have 2 times as much thread on the back of
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 2, 2007
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          What makes Blackwork look good is the crisp black thread against the
          white ground fabric. If you do back stitch, you have 2 times as much
          thread on the back of the fabric. To some extent this will show
          through making the blackwork look a bit muddy. It won't be obvious
          but it will be there.

          In Service,
          Sabrina de la Bere
          Guild Patron
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