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de lurking

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  • Lucia
    Decided it was time to stop lurking and share a photo of my most recent work so I uploaded into a file named Lucia . The first photo is a partial picture of
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 3, 2007
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      Decided it was time to stop lurking and share a photo of my most
      recent work so I uploaded into a file named "Lucia". The first photo
      is a partial picture of the piece I just finished and the second photo
      is what I used as historical inspiration. The winged bull is from a
      cope which was at one time in the Convento de la Orden Cisterciense,
      Osek. My translation of Spanish leaves much to be desired but believe
      the piece is dated somewhere between 1248-1264. The original
      photograph of the cope was found in La Riqueza del Bordado
      ecclesiastico en Checoslovaquia.

      I've been on a practical applications kick-trying to find "period"
      methods" and applying them to my Sca interests.

      I just started embroiderying a little over a year ago and have been
      trying to find good photographs of extant pieces. Haven't been able to
      find very many quality pictures that showed enough detail to venture
      forth so I was very excited to find this one.

      I'd be interested in hearing opinions as to whether the crimped broad
      plate I used for the wings is what might have been used in
      period. Talked with Joadie at Hedgehog and she didn't know of any
      metal that quite fit my description. Initially tried using pearl purl
      but that didn't give the desired outcome. I got the idea of crimping
      the broadplate from the Royal School of Needlework Embroidery
      Techniques (Sally Sanders).

      This was the first time I attempted layering the padding-it proved
      quite a challenge but am ready to try another piece.

      Look forward to sharing other projects with you want to thank the
      egroup and WK Guild for being such an inspiration! Without the
      photographs of your work I'm sure I never would have attempted my
      first piece of embroidery.

      Lucia
    • Debra Cobb
      Hi Lucia, Your embroidery has brought up alot of questions which I m hoping those who are more knowledgeable about this type of embroidery could help answer.
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 6, 2007
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        Hi Lucia,

        Your embroidery has brought up alot of questions which I'm hoping those who
        are more knowledgeable about this type of embroidery could help answer.

        Last night I thumbed through the book La Riqueza del Bordado Eclesaistico en
        Checoslovaquia on page 60 and found the Bull representing the Evangelist St.
        Luke. The embroidered detail was done on a chasuble in the 16th c.
        according to the description beneath the b/w photo.

        Apparently in the 15th & 16th centuries there was some padded or "raised
        work" going on in Germany, Spain and Eastern European areas. Since the book
        is written in Spanish (1949 & out of print), I had a friend try to translate
        the technique used. Between her Spanish and my embroidery we sort of came
        up with this.

        To mold the shape of the figure....some type of plastic mold (plasticá?) was
        used or the shape could be molded or padded with fabric (tela), skin (cuero)
        or a type of cardboard (cartón). Over the mold was laid fabric (silk or
        satin) which was then covered with gold thread. Apparently paint was also
        used...not sure if the paint was left exposed such as for faces or if it was
        used as a way of outlining the design before embroidery was applied.
        Sounds like the usual gold metal laid work (2 threads couched at a time) was
        used to cover the molded figure. String or cording (Cordoncito) was also
        used for padding. They also mentioned using a thick metal to form shapes
        like a beard. Perhaps this was used for the mane of the bull???

        Then I went to the Schuette-Christensen book A Pictorial History of
        Embroidery, and she mentions that in the early 16th c. there was period
        whereby this "raised work" was combined with "or nue" and there's a photo of
        a horse which is similar to your bull on pages 178 & 179, which is one of
        the details featured on an altar curtain by Antonio Sadorni called St.
        George and The Dragon done in Barcelona in 1460. The book says that during
        the 15th c. such raised work/or nue was "already being produced in widely
        separated areas" and there are pictures of pieces from South Germany (1430)
        and Catalonia (1460). However, the book notes that the "most productive
        period" was the 16th c.

        Schuette & Christensen describe the St. George & The Dragon piece as
        follows:

        "Relief embroidery in gold thread, silver wire, cords and silk in white,
        red, blue, brown, yellow and green. The foreground, the architectural
        details, animals and costumes in or nué; faces and hands in split and stem
        stitch, flowers in satin and stem stitch. The artist Antonio Sardoni, was a
        member of a family of embroiderers of Flemish origin in Barcelona and
        received commissions from the town."

        Lucia, I hope some of this info can help you.

        Yours in service,

        Isela

        _____

        From: WKneedle@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WKneedle@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Lucia
        Sent: Feb 03, 2007 5:43 PM
        To: WKneedle@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [WKneedle] de lurking



        Decided it was time to stop lurking and share a photo of my most
        recent work so I uploaded into a file named "Lucia". The first photo
        is a partial picture of the piece I just finished and the second photo
        is what I used as historical inspiration. The winged bull is from a
        cope which was at one time in the Convento de la Orden Cisterciense,
        Osek. My translation of Spanish leaves much to be desired but believe
        the piece is dated somewhere between 1248-1264. The original
        photograph of the cope was found in La Riqueza del Bordado
        ecclesiastico en Checoslovaquia.

        I've been on a practical applications kick-trying to find "period"
        methods" and applying them to my Sca interests.

        I just started embroiderying a little over a year ago and have been
        trying to find good photographs of extant pieces. Haven't been able to
        find very many quality pictures that showed enough detail to venture
        forth so I was very excited to find this one.

        I'd be interested in hearing opinions as to whether the crimped broad
        plate I used for the wings is what might have been used in
        period. Talked with Joadie at Hedgehog and she didn't know of any
        metal that quite fit my description. Initially tried using pearl purl
        but that didn't give the desired outcome. I got the idea of crimping
        the broadplate from the Royal School of Needlework Embroidery
        Techniques (Sally Sanders).

        This was the first time I attempted layering the padding-it proved
        quite a challenge but am ready to try another piece.

        Look forward to sharing other projects with you want to thank the
        egroup and WK Guild for being such an inspiration! Without the
        photographs of your work I'm sure I never would have attempted my
        first piece of embroidery.

        Lucia






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