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GENRE BY GENRE ======= HAIKU =======

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  • Susumu Takiguchi
    WORLD HAIKU REVIEW Published in WHCworldhaikureview on 1 January 2007 GENRE BY GENRE ============== HAIKU =============== EDITOR S WELCOME Readers are now
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 1, 2007
      WORLD HAIKU REVIEW
       
      Published in WHCworldhaikureview on 1 January 2007
       
      GENRE BY GENRE
       
       
      ==============  HAIKU  ===============
       
       
      EDITOR'S WELCOME
       
      Readers are now more accustomed to the six different categories of haiku which are featured in WHR's haiku selections. Of course, a haiku poet is a single person and cannot be dissected neatly and conveniently into categories. All emotions, thoughts and feelings which are working inside a poet will interact with what he or she experiences in the world around. Quite in which way such interaction leads the poet to is unpredictable. That is part of the fascination and joy of poetry creation.
       
      However, the end results can be displayed according to some practical and reasonable characteristics, just like there are in the same music jazz, pop songs, country Western or classical music, or within classical music piano sonatas can be separated from symphonies. WHCvanguard haiku dealing with horrendous cruelty or violent sex do not mix well with WHChaikuneoclassical haiku admiring the beauty of Mt. Fuji or depicting loneliness consoled by cricket songs. I don't want to listen to rock 'n' roll and Mozart in the same concert hall, played simultaneouly. I love Dean Martin and Luciano Pavarotti almost in equal measure but I don't listen to them together. WHC's haiku classification means just that.
       
      It is not so much asking poets to write poems according to such categories (which in itself is an important task but...) as asking them to create anything they like but to show anything worth showing in the right showrooms. If at any given time there are no works worth showing in some of these showrooms, then just don't. Equally, poets who have no interest in kigo at all do not need to post anything, or even join, WHChaikuneoclassical any more than those with no interest in progressive and radical end of vers libre haiku should post, or even subscribe, to WHCvanguard.
       
      There have been misunderstandings and confusion about these aims of WHC's haiku classification. Such misunderstandings or confusion must not be allowed to stand in the way of poets' creation. And these are problems of the poets' own creation and therefore problems for themselves to solve.
       
      Readers are welcome and encouraged to submit their original haiku on a on-going basis as well as in response to our call for submission. 
       
      Kengin,
       
      Susumu Takiguchi
      Editor WHChaiku, WHR
       

      [Introduction]
       
       all the six categories are as follows:
       
      (a)   GENERAL CATEGORY: Haiku poems of any type, form, topic, with or without kigo;

      (b)   THEMED CATEGORY: Haiku poems on the theme of "Solitude" (to be broadly interpreted. No restrictions
                                                regarding form or kigo);

      (c)   KIGO CATEGORY: "Leaves turn colour";

      (d)   NEO-CLASSICAL HAIKU:  Strictly traditional (see:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WHChaikuneoclassical )

      (e)   SHINTAI HAIKU: "shintai haiku" (new-style freer haiku) which sits between neo-classical and vanguard.

      (f)   VANGUARD HAIKU:  Most radical and freest haiku (see:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/WHCvanguard )
       
      Each category has The Best (First Place), Best Ten and Zatsuei (haiku of merit). From the six The Best poems, The Grand Best (the best from all categories) is chosen as the Editor's Choice of the Issue.
       
      List of Poets Featured
       
      Dave Bacharach, US
      Kent Chadwick, US
      Cathy Drinkwater Better, US
      Lynn Edge
      Elizabeth Fanto, US
      Michael Flack, Australia
      Lorin Ford, Australia
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada
      Damien Gabriels, France
      Denis M. Garrison, US
      Victor P. Gendrano, US
      Olga Hooper (Origa), US
      Elizabeth Howard, US
      Kirsty Karkow, US
      Bill Kenney, US
      Deborah P. Kolodji, US
      Carmel Lively, US
      Vinodh Marella (Yajushi), India
      Tomislav Maretic, HR
      Dubravko Marijanovic, HR
      Zoran Mimica, Austria
      Ruzica Mokos, HR
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia
      Paul Pfleuger, Jr., Taiwan
      Zhanna P. Rader, US
      Narayanan Raghunathan, India
      Terrie Leigh Relf (semi), US
      Bruce Ross, US
      Yuri Runov, Russia
      Ann K. Schwader, US
      Vaughn Seward (tanemaki koishi), Canada
      Adelaide B. Shaw, US
      Nancy Stewart Smith, US
      Marie Summers, US
      Tad Wojnicki, US/Taiwan


      #########################
       
       
      THE GRAND BEST (The best from all categories and thus the Editor's Choice)

      Joint Winners
      red and gold
      the hillside threads
      into autumn
       
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada


       
      revealing itself
      upon a banana leaf,
      october wind
       
      Vaughn Seward (tanemaki koishi), Canada
       
       
      * * *
       
      I have tried in vain to choose one of these as THE GRAND BEST. Both use century-old themes. Both, nevertheless, have newness and originality. Both deal with autumn. (And both are Canadians!) Both are good. Both I like also. In other words I have absolutely no reason why I would choose one in preference to the other and one thing I don't do is to toss a coin. The only solution left for me, therefore, is to make them joint winners.
       
      'threads into autumn' and that the october wind is 'revealing itself upon a banana leaf' are the bits which make each of these haiku special respectively. The former is excellence of wording or expression. 'nishiki wo oru' is a Japanese expression which means to weave or thread cloths of exquisite colours and Fraser's phrase is surprisingly close to it, even if it may be a sheer coincidence. 'threads into' gives a sense of movement and the progression of time, as well as a skilful sketch of the autumn landscape.
       
      Seward's is a case of superior grasp of an ordinary occurrence in an unusual and innovative way. We are accustomed to such expressions as whatever leaf or leaves swaying or trembling. However, to see wind revealing itself because of the certain movement of the banana leaf is new indeed.
       
      Both are extremely good examples that we can still create a new and original haiku using the hackneyed and stereotypical materials.

       
      ******************************************************
       

       
      (a)   GENERAL CATEGORY:

      THE BEST
       
      deep ocean fog
      the ferry passes
      a last buoy
       
      Bruce Ross, US
       
      *

      BEST TEN  (In no particular order but includes THE BEST)


      1
       
      first chill
      a spider weaves his web
      under the neon light
       
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia

      2

      doctor's waiting room
      tropical plants
      reach for light

      Elizabeth Fanto, US

      3
       
      Summer day —
      the whole valley is just for me
      and the skylarks
       
      Zhanna Rader, US

      4
      short day —
      clouds race across
      the prairie sky
       
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada

      5
       
      Without distant peaks
      the plain looks so dreary
      swept by autumn wind
       
      Yuri Runov, Russia

      6
       

      Spring again —

      how can it be when my son

      died last autumn?

       

      Nancy Stewart Smith, US

      7

      deep ocean fog
      the ferry passes
      a last buoy
       
      Bruce Ross, US

      8
      autumn evening
      following my shadow
      into the shadows
       
      Bill Kenney, US

      9
      old path
      grassed over
      spring

      Tad Wojnicki, US/Taiwan

      10
      the old couple
      not ready to go in —
      autumn evening
       
      Bill Kenney, US

      *

      ZATSUEI  (In no particular order)
       
      widow's walk
      a pool of leaves circles
      the river birch
       
      Kirsty Karkow, US
       
      *

      Hurrican Katrina: Fifteen Haiku
      Septembet 2005
       
      New Orleans floodwaters:
      the face of the mutt
      stranded in a tree
       
      suddenly homeless
      a mother holds her babies
      too tight
       
      water swirls
      around submerged street signs—
      rainbows of oil
       
      in water-logged buildings
      broken windows gape...
      helicopter sound
       
      floating rooftops
      flames leap
      from the water's surface
       
      nightfall—
      gunshots ring out
      across the dark water
       
      crowded shelter
      the old woman's
      tear-streaked face
       
      amid search and resuce
      video of looters
      with a cart of TVs
       
      manna from heaven—
      helicopter-dropped MREs
      splash down
       
      sunlit tarmac:
      a soldier carries a child
      in each arm
       
      rooftop rescue—
      beneath the floodwaters
      countless dead
       
      sunset:
      a journalist in hip waders
      begins his report
       
      photo-ops and sound bytes—
      exhausted relief workers
      hand out water
       
      rifles at the ready
      going door to door
      in search of life
       
      fetid waters
      on his porch a hold-out
      smiles and waves at the camera
       
      Cathy Drinkwater Better, US

      *
       
      A night walk
      with fireflies to the music
      of tree frogs
       
      Zhanna Rader, US
       
      *
       
      moonlight fresco
      on the snowy slope
      pawprints
       
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada
       
      *
       
      early worship
      sparrow shadows crisscross
      the stained-glass dove
       
      Elizabeth Howard, US
       
      *
       
      sunrise
      the night fisherman reels
      in his line
       
      Lynn Edge, US


      early morning
      the heron's double image
      glides downriver
       
      Lynn Edge, US
       
      *
       
      Snow on a crow's back —
      white on black, on white

      Kent Chadwick, US

      *

      garden spider
      a sunray caught
      in its web

      Marie Summers, US

      *

      watering —
      a lizard laps up the drops
      spilt on the pavement

      Damien Gabriels, France

      *

      a rock on the hill
      on a petrified shell
      lichen grows
       
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia

      *

      white dawn
      a moon crab sinks back
      into sand

       

      Lorin Ford, Australia

      *

      moonlit bridge —
      my shadow checks the path
      before my steps
       
      Olga Hooper (Origa), US

      *

      Tedious chit-chat...
      light taps of the evening rain
      in old apple trees.
       
      Yuri Runov, Russia
       
      *
       
      aeons pass ~  
      yellow butterfly still
      on the red rose
       
      Narayanan Raghunathan, India
       
      *
       
      a sun appears

      at midnight ~ the lamp

      lights by itself

       

      Narayanan Raghunathan, India

       

      *

       

      island through the haze
      quivering with
      the clamour of cicadas

       

      Tomislav Maretic, HR
       
      *
       
      dancing with waves
      snowflakes and sea foam
      winter game
       
      Ruzica Mokos, HR

      *
       

      Birds greet the morning. . .

      sunlight filtering through the leaves

      warm summer rain 

       

      Michael Flack, Australia

       

      *

       

      no money
      — just the time
      left

      Zoran Mimica, Austria

       

      *

       

      waiting for a verdict —
      the window becomes opaque
      with frost

      Denis M. Garrison, US

       

      *



       


      (b)   THEMED CATEGORY (Solitude):


      THE BEST

       
      a stray stork
      the sound of planes landing
      and taking off
       
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia

      *


      BEST TEN  (In no particular order but includes THE BEST)

      1
       
      alone on the beach
      the wavelength
      of a single thought
       
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada

      2

      a stray stork
      the sound of planes landing
      and taking off
       
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia
       
      3

      Cutting old hazel —
      we grew up together
      and aged...
       
      Yuri Runov, Russia

      4
       
      a widow watches
      the setting sun, unmoved
      by the loon's cry
       
      Victor P. Gendrano, US

      5
       
      aimless feet
      wander
      in solitude
       
      Vinodh Marella (Yajushi), India

      6

      the old couple
      silent together sharing
      solitudes
       
      Bill Kenney, US

      7
      grandma's house
      dust mites and memories
      live in the attic
       
      Carmel Lively, US

      8
       
      solitude
      only the hum
      of a dryer on low
       
      Terrie Leigh Relf (semi), US

      9

      all alone —
      urinating on my
      own shadow

      Dubravko Marijanovic, HR

      10
       
      winter isolation —
      only the death visits
      remote villages
       
      Tomislav Maretic, HR

      *
       
      ZATSUEI

      shallow water
      a heron and I watch           
      one small fish
       
      Kirsty Karkow, Maine USA
       
      *
       
      Alone at last —
      a scuba tank on my back
      and fish around 
       
      Zhanna Rader, US
       
      *
       
      late day stillness
      a single acorn hits
      the back deck
       
      Bruce Ross, US
       
      *
       
      crowded subway —
      careful to avoid
      all the eyes
       
      Dave Bacharach, US
       
      *
       
      camping alone —
      the faces of women
      in the fire
       
      Dave Bacharach, US
       
      *
       
      long-distance call
      lying alone and cold
      in the double bed
       
      Elizabeth Howard, US
       
      *
       
      hidden waterfall
      in the redwoods
      a lone hiker

      Deborah P. Kolodji, US

       
      *
       
      a swift crossed the sky
      that moment
      she was gone

      Denis M. Garrison, US

      *

      sleepless —
      how even the moon
      is alone

      Ann K. Schwader, US
       
       
       

      (c)   KIGO CATEGORY: "Leaves turning colour"

       
      THE BEST

      red and gold
      the hillside threads
      into autumn
       
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada
       


      BEST TEN  (In no particular order but includes THE BEST)

      1

      How carelessly
      the birch throws away its gold
      to the autumn wind
       
      Yuri Runov, Russia

      2

      all the leaves are brown. . .

      my son's ashes and dog

      both lost to me

       

      Nancy Stewart Smith, US

      3

      Leaves turning —
      this year the old man watches them
      only from his window
       
      Zhanna Rader, US


      4

      red and gold
      the hillside threads
      into autumn
       
      Laryalee Fraser, Canada


      5

      asphalt driveway —
      a leaf mosaic
      shifts its pattern

       
      Adelaide B. Shaw, US


      6

      leaves turning color
      I ask my hairdresser
      to hide the gray
       
      Deborah P. Kolodji, US

      7

      marching band
      red and yellow leaves swirl
      with the panoply of flags
       
      Elizabeth Howard, US

      8
       
      leaves turning color
      last green patches as green
      as they will ever be
       
      Bill Kenney, US
       
      9

      red leaves!

      the tree climbing vine

      drops its disguise

       

      Lorin Ford, Australia


      10
      grey morning
      the first yellow birch leaf
      behind the wiper
       
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia

      *

      ZATSUEI  (In no particular order)

       
      as leaves turn                
      a laughing gull
      on every rock
       
      Kirsty Karkow, Maine USA

      *
       
      Windy day —
      red maple waving good-by
      to its leaves
       
      Zhanna Rader, US
       
      *
       
      autumn equinox
      the two burning bush
      brighter red
       
      Bruce Ross, US
       
      *
       
      early September
      with the first color changes
      how white the birch
       
      Bruce Ross, US
       
      *
       
      mountain trek
      a spray of red leaves
      hanging from the bluff

      Elizabeth Howard, US

       
      *
       
      her last quilt
      an abstract pattern
      of fall leaves
       
      Carmel Lively, US
       
      *
       
      coming back from work
      first yellow leaves
      in the path of the garage
       
      Damien Gabriels, France
       
      *
      sunny California
      only the maple trees wear
      golden leaves

      Victor P. Gendrano, US

      *
       
      Indian summer
      footpath paved in gold —
      acacia leaves
       
      Polona Oblak, Slovenia
       
      *
       

      yellowing leaves —

      she quits cigarettes

      again

       

      Lorin Ford, Australia

       

      *

       

      unfolding autumn
      with color change, the tree
      has shrunk
       
      Olga Hooper (Origa), US
       
       

       


      (d)   NEO-CLASSICAL HAIKU: 

      THE BEST

      revealing itself
      upon a banana leaf,
      october wind
       
      Vaughn Seward (tanemaki koishi), Canada
       
       
      *

      BEST TEN

      1

      nameless flowers

      sway in the cool breeze ~

      a butterfly names them ~

       

      Narayanan Raghunathan, India



      2

      end of August
      evening advances
      shadow by shadow
       
      Bill Kenney, US

      3

      autumn dusk
      grandpa gazes at the bird
      flying alone
       
      Victor P. Gendrano, US

      4

      revealing itself
      upon a banana leaf,

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