Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: MARY ANN MIXER

Expand Messages
  • Alistair Kerr
    Well dave, will just have to keep my eyes open up here in case one ever crops up, I would love to have one. Al ... and
    Message 1 of 17 , Sep 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Well dave, will just have to keep my eyes open up here in case one ever
      crops up, I would love to have one.

      Al


      --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@...> wrote:
      >
      > Gday Alistair
      > It also has a small plate attached to the handle with the serial No
      and
      > voltage which states "BRITISH MADE"
      > Dave
      >
    • Jon Jasper
      Alistair: Question for you. Can you describe in more detail the way you re seeing how the Mary Ann attaches to its stand? I looked at the most detailed
      Message 2 of 17 , Sep 1, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        Alistair:

        Question for you. Can you describe in more detail the way you're seeing
        how the Mary Ann attaches to its stand? I looked at the most detailed
        picture Dave posted, in its largest size and "aren't getting" what you
        say, in terms of it mounting upside-down (could EASILY be that I'm
        stupid, so don't expend loads of energy/time on it).

        I like the way whomever did their take on Sunbeam's mixfinder dial.
        Given the design ethic of the period, it's just so sensible, so slick,
        so sleek - I'm not surprised everyone else climbed on board that band
        wagon.

        Thank, Alistair!!

        Jon

        -----Original Message-----
        From: WACEM@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WACEM@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Alistair Kerr
        Sent: Monday, September 01, 2008 3:05 AM
        To: WACEM@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER


        Well dave, will just have to keep my eyes open up here in case one ever
        crops up, I would love to have one.

        Al


        --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@...> wrote:
        >
        > Gday Alistair
        > It also has a small plate attached to the handle with the serial No
        and
        > voltage which states "BRITISH MADE"
        > Dave
        >



        ------------------------------------

        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Alistair Kerr
        Jon, It took me a while to work it out myself, it was only when I realise that there were two drive shafts on the top AND bottom that i worked it out. If you
        Message 3 of 17 , Sep 2, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Jon,

          It took me a while to work it out myself, it was only when I realise
          that there were two drive shafts on the top AND bottom that i worked
          it out. If you look at picture #5 when it is being used as a hand
          mixer you will see that the Mary Ann name is upside down. Their are
          two lugs on the back on the handle which secure it to the stand, so
          when it is on the stand there is not a handle which you can use to
          raise or lower the head.

          These days it would have to carry a warning not to place the beeters
          (sorry could not resist that!) in the upwards facing drive shafts,
          which ever pair that might be, depending on how you use the mixer.

          Al

          --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Jasper" <jjasper@...> wrote:
          >
          > Alistair:
          >
          > Question for you. Can you describe in more detail the way you're
          seeing
          > how the Mary Ann attaches to its stand? I looked at the most
          detailed
          > picture Dave posted, in its largest size and "aren't getting" what
          you
          > say, in terms of it mounting upside-down (could EASILY be that I'm
          > stupid, so don't expend loads of energy/time on it).
          >
          > I like the way whomever did their take on Sunbeam's mixfinder dial.
          > Given the design ethic of the period, it's just so sensible, so
          slick,
          > so sleek - I'm not surprised everyone else climbed on board that
          band
          > wagon.
          >
          > Thank, Alistair!!
          >
          > Jon
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: WACEM@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WACEM@yahoogroups.com] On
          Behalf Of
          > Alistair Kerr
          > Sent: Monday, September 01, 2008 3:05 AM
          > To: WACEM@yahoogroups.com
          > Subject: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER
          >
          >
          > Well dave, will just have to keep my eyes open up here in case one
          ever
          > crops up, I would love to have one.
          >
          > Al
          >
          >
          > --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Gday Alistair
          > > It also has a small plate attached to the handle with the serial
          No
          > and
          > > voltage which states "BRITISH MADE"
          > > Dave
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
        • Jon Jasper
          Thanks for cluing me in, Alistair! As my mom would say - yes, but did you REALLY look?? Guess we know the answer to that one - I m 46 and still haven t
          Message 4 of 17 , Sep 2, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Thanks for cluing me in, Alistair! As my mom would say - yes, but did
            you REALLY look?? Guess we know the answer to that one - I'm 46 and
            still haven't learned.

            Jon
          • Alistair Kerr
            Well Jon, I am 50 and it took me a couple of goes as well - what threw me was that I did not believe that anyone would supply a stand mixer without providing
            Message 5 of 17 , Sep 2, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Well Jon, I am 50 and it took me a couple of goes as well - what threw
              me was that I did not believe that anyone would supply a "stand" mixer
              without providing a handle to raise the head while on the stand. At
              first I thought, whist still muttering "Sunbeam Clone", that the handle
              had been rotated round in juice extractor mode, it was only when I
              realised that there was "no handle", that I looked more closely at the
              other pics

              Al

              PS Mother DOES know best - well usually anyway :)


              --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "Jon Jasper" <jjasper@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks for cluing me in, Alistair! As my mom would say - yes, but did
              > you REALLY look?? Guess we know the answer to that one - I'm 46 and
              > still haven't learned.
              >
              > Jon
              >
            • Nancy
              Dave, I have been staring at Mary Ann off and on, (with vast envy), flipping back and forth in the pictures. It s absolutely amazing! I don t think anyone else
              Message 6 of 17 , Sep 14, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Dave, I have been staring at Mary Ann off and on, (with vast envy),
                flipping back and forth in the pictures. It's absolutely amazing! I
                don't think anyone else had a complete double drive mixer!
                I also don't recall seeing a mixer that mounted by the handle. There
                were flip-back mixers about with no handles other than early
                Sunbeams-the GE gooseneck 49x390, the Dominion Modern Mode, the Pantry
                Pet- but absolutely nothing like Mary Ann.
                The large ridged mixfinder dial is super, and looks to be easier to
                see and use than the Mixmaster's. Since you couldn't hold on to this
                mixer's handle while turning, a smoother dial would have been a
                disadvantage.

                Did you get any bowls other than the juicer? What does the handle
                appear to be made of? It's amazing that the entire weight of the mixer
                is trusted to rest on metal studs embedded in the handle. It doesn't
                look like a light weight motor either.
                Can you imagine the advertising for Mary Ann?? "This mixer stands on
                its head to please you!", or some such variation.

                Al, thanks for the Thorn reference!
                The only Mary Ann I came up with in a kitchen context was the Mary Ann
                eggbeater made by EKCO.
                All I can say is WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyone who comes across anything
                about Mary Ann, please tell us all.
                Nancy P.

                --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Gang
                > Just found another odd mixer here downunder.
                > Pics in a new album named MARY ANN MIXER.
                > I googled it but couldnt find anything.
                > The plate says it was made by Thorn in the UK.
                > Anyone else seen one of these?
                > Dave
                >
              • m1xermaniac
                Hi Nancy The on/off switch is mounted in the handle. It automatically switches off when the head is tilted back. The handle appears to be cast aluminium. No
                Message 7 of 17 , Sep 14, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Nancy
                  The on/off switch is mounted in the handle. It automatically switches
                  off when the head is tilted back.
                  The handle appears to be cast aluminium.
                  No bowls unfortunately.
                  The pedestal allows the head to swing from side to side I guess for
                  small or large bowl.
                  BTW my Sunbeam collection opens in a local museum tomorrow.
                  I will post some pics later in the week.
                  Dave
                • rsburritt@gmail.com
                  Not that anyone cares...but as a huge fan of zeppelins, I have to say I love the blimp-like shape of the Mary Ann. In an age where it seems that everything was
                  Message 8 of 17 , Sep 14, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Not that anyone cares...but as a huge fan of zeppelins, I have to say I love the blimp-like shape of the Mary Ann.
                    In an age where it seems that everything was trying to emulate "progress", based on the latest, hottest technology at the time, that is just the first thing that sticks out to me.
                    I wonder if the aerodynamic shape was supposed to also be a subliminal message, e.g.; intimating that the mixer was so lightweight it actually seemed to float on air.

                    Just a few quirky ideas from the peanut gallery...


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Nancy
                    To: WACEM@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2008 3:54 AM
                    Subject: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER


                    Dave, I have been staring at Mary Ann off and on, (with vast envy),
                    flipping back and forth in the pictures. It's absolutely amazing! I
                    don't think anyone else had a complete double drive mixer!
                    I also don't recall seeing a mixer that mounted by the handle. There
                    were flip-back mixers about with no handles other than early
                    Sunbeams-the GE gooseneck 49x390, the Dominion Modern Mode, the Pantry
                    Pet- but absolutely nothing like Mary Ann.
                    The large ridged mixfinder dial is super, and looks to be easier to
                    see and use than the Mixmaster's. Since you couldn't hold on to this
                    mixer's handle while turning, a smoother dial would have been a
                    disadvantage.

                    Did you get any bowls other than the juicer? What does the handle
                    appear to be made of? It's amazing that the entire weight of the mixer
                    is trusted to rest on metal studs embedded in the handle. It doesn't
                    look like a light weight motor either.
                    Can you imagine the advertising for Mary Ann?? "This mixer stands on
                    its head to please you!", or some such variation.

                    Al, thanks for the Thorn reference!
                    The only Mary Ann I came up with in a kitchen context was the Mary Ann
                    eggbeater made by EKCO.
                    All I can say is WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyone who comes across anything
                    about Mary Ann, please tell us all.
                    Nancy P.

                    --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Gang
                    > Just found another odd mixer here downunder.
                    > Pics in a new album named MARY ANN MIXER.
                    > I googled it but couldnt find anything.
                    > The plate says it was made by Thorn in the UK.
                    > Anyone else seen one of these?
                    > Dave
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Jon Jasper
                    Well, I guess the Hindenburg at Lakehurst, NJ pretty much popped that balloon. (OW! Stop hitting me!! I M SORRY!!). My dad recalled seeing the Graf
                    Message 9 of 17 , Sep 16, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Well, I guess the Hindenburg at Lakehurst, NJ pretty much popped that
                      balloon. (OW! Stop hitting me!! I'M SORRY!!). My dad recalled seeing
                      the Graf Zeppelin fly over his town in NH in the early thirties, as a
                      boy - he was thrilled by the sight. I personally can't imagine the
                      grandeur of seeing something the size of a large cruise ship flying.
                      Actually, I guess the Hindenburg plus the U.S. Navy's Akron and Macon
                      disasters really banged the final nails in rigid airship travel.

                      I see, based on quick, casual web-look-ups that they are pretty much
                      seemingly accepting the static electricity on the craft's "new " coating
                      as the cause of the infamous fire. One site said that with its new
                      coating it was a "flying bomb, waiting to go off."

                      Even in their heyday, it was an inexact science as witnessed by this
                      picture of the unladen Los Angeles sat The Lakehurst mooring:

                      http://tinyurl.com/5o2bdq

                      (oh dear, now THAT'S inconvenient.... STUPID UPDRAFTS!!)

                      Jon

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: WACEM@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WACEM@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                      rsburritt@...
                      Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2008 5:27 PM
                      To: WACEM GROUP
                      Subject: Re: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER


                      Not that anyone cares...but as a huge fan of zeppelins, I have to say I
                      love the blimp-like shape of the Mary Ann.
                      In an age where it seems that everything was trying to emulate
                      "progress", based on the latest, hottest technology at the time, that is
                      just the first thing that sticks out to me.
                      I wonder if the aerodynamic shape was supposed to also be a subliminal
                      message, e.g.; intimating that the mixer was so lightweight it actually
                      seemed to float on air.

                      Just a few quirky ideas from the peanut gallery...


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Nancy
                      To: WACEM@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2008 3:54 AM
                      Subject: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER


                      Dave, I have been staring at Mary Ann off and on, (with vast envy),
                      flipping back and forth in the pictures. It's absolutely amazing! I
                      don't think anyone else had a complete double drive mixer! I also don't
                      recall seeing a mixer that mounted by the handle. There were flip-back
                      mixers about with no handles other than early Sunbeams-the GE gooseneck
                      49x390, the Dominion Modern Mode, the Pantry
                      Pet- but absolutely nothing like Mary Ann.
                      The large ridged mixfinder dial is super, and looks to be easier to see
                      and use than the Mixmaster's. Since you couldn't hold on to this mixer's
                      handle while turning, a smoother dial would have been a disadvantage.

                      Did you get any bowls other than the juicer? What does the handle appear
                      to be made of? It's amazing that the entire weight of the mixer is
                      trusted to rest on metal studs embedded in the handle. It doesn't look
                      like a light weight motor either. Can you imagine the advertising for
                      Mary Ann?? "This mixer stands on its head to please you!", or some such
                      variation.

                      Al, thanks for the Thorn reference!
                      The only Mary Ann I came up with in a kitchen context was the Mary Ann
                      eggbeater made by EKCO.
                      All I can say is WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyone who comes across anything about
                      Mary Ann, please tell us all. Nancy P.

                      --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Hi Gang
                      > Just found another odd mixer here downunder.
                      > Pics in a new album named MARY ANN MIXER.
                      > I googled it but couldnt find anything.
                      > The plate says it was made by Thorn in the UK.
                      > Anyone else seen one of these?
                      > Dave
                      >





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links
                    • rsburritt@gmail.com
                      I just saw a show about it, called Seconds From Disaster, which airs on National Geographic. It was a brand new episode. The foremost investigator of the
                      Message 10 of 17 , Sep 16, 2008
                      • 0 Attachment
                        I just saw a show about it, called Seconds From Disaster, which airs on National Geographic. It was a brand new episode. The foremost investigator of the NTSB here in the USA worked on the case for a while, for the show.

                        What they found was that there was a hydrogen leak in one of the cells which happened as a result of a stabilizer wire pulling out of the zeppelin's inner frame/skeleton during the hard maneuvering they were doing in the gusting winds, while trying to line up with the mooring mast. The wire pulled too taught during the twisting and turning caused by the maneuvering through the gusts, which the zeppelin was not supposed to be subject to...the captain knew that he was not supposed to be attempting landing under such gusty conditions...but as you recall, the gust indicator sign at the airport was not displaying either, so they were not exactly sure of the full strength of the gusts on board...they just knew that there were gusts from the thunderstorms that had passed over. When the wire gave way, it sliced through the inner cell and opened a hole in the top of it, which started to billow H gas out from the inner cell into the space between the inner cell and the zeppelin's outer skin. It was this "bubble" of hydrogen that was sparked by a random burst of static through the zeppelin's frame (a regular, routine occurrence) that caught fire.

                        This most likely scenario was devised by piecing together eyewitness accounts, including the crew reports and reports of people on the ground seeing the upper skin appearing to start rippling toward the back of the zeppelin (most likely the result of the ruptured cell leaking the hydrogen under pressure)...as well as using the most up-to-date technology as of 2007, when the show was produced. The Germans, who helped, also accepted the findings and I believe this is now seen as the final, final word on the case since it is from the NTSB.

                        If there is a silver lining to this cloud it is that this did in fact happen over land when the ship was so low and people had a chance to escape. If the same scenario had happened over the ocean or while the zeppelin was at crusing altitude (roughly 1000 ft) (same scenario meaning a rupture of a hydrogen cell and a spark, which would have almost certainly caused an explosion) then there would have been almost no chance of any survivors.

                        It was a very interesting show, in fact I believe it's still saved on the DVR at my folks' house. But I don't currently have a way to get it onto VHS or DVD or into the computer.

                        During the show, they debunked the theory that it was the outer skin that could have started the fire. Using fire science, which was demonstrated in the show, they determined that it would have taken the zeppelin several hours to burn in that manner, because the outer skin was flame retardant. The skin theory, which was one of the prevailing theories at the time, was one of the first theories they visited.

                        If you get NatGeo, this show is really worth watching.

                        To keep this on topic (sort of), they must have had a mixer or two onboard the Hindenburg. It would be interesting to find out what kind. Bosch? Miele? Braun?

                        In Germany, in the town of Zeppelinheim near Frankfurt am Main, there is a large museum dedicated to airships and there is a display of Hindenburg artifacts. I never took the time to go there, but they did have a huge exhibit of the Hindenburg artifacts on display at the Frankfurt airport for almost a year in 1985 and that was quite impressive. There were things that had been used in earlier flights, as well as a few things that had been recovered from the disaster. It was so long ago, I don't remember everything that was there.

                        Roland


                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Jon Jasper
                        To: WACEM@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Tuesday, September 16, 2008 6:12 AM
                        Subject: RE: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER (can't resist!)


                        Well, I guess the Hindenburg at Lakehurst, NJ pretty much popped that
                        balloon. (OW! Stop hitting me!! I'M SORRY!!). My dad recalled seeing
                        the Graf Zeppelin fly over his town in NH in the early thirties, as a
                        boy - he was thrilled by the sight. I personally can't imagine the
                        grandeur of seeing something the size of a large cruise ship flying.
                        Actually, I guess the Hindenburg plus the U.S. Navy's Akron and Macon
                        disasters really banged the final nails in rigid airship travel.

                        I see, based on quick, casual web-look-ups that they are pretty much
                        seemingly accepting the static electricity on the craft's "new " coating
                        as the cause of the infamous fire. One site said that with its new
                        coating it was a "flying bomb, waiting to go off."

                        Even in their heyday, it was an inexact science as witnessed by this
                        picture of the unladen Los Angeles sat The Lakehurst mooring:

                        http://tinyurl.com/5o2bdq

                        (oh dear, now THAT'S inconvenient.... STUPID UPDRAFTS!!)

                        Jon

                        -----Original Message-----
                        From: WACEM@yahoogroups.com [mailto:WACEM@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                        rsburritt@...
                        Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2008 5:27 PM
                        To: WACEM GROUP
                        Subject: Re: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER

                        Not that anyone cares...but as a huge fan of zeppelins, I have to say I
                        love the blimp-like shape of the Mary Ann.
                        In an age where it seems that everything was trying to emulate
                        "progress", based on the latest, hottest technology at the time, that is
                        just the first thing that sticks out to me.
                        I wonder if the aerodynamic shape was supposed to also be a subliminal
                        message, e.g.; intimating that the mixer was so lightweight it actually
                        seemed to float on air.

                        Just a few quirky ideas from the peanut gallery...

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Nancy
                        To: WACEM@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2008 3:54 AM
                        Subject: [WACEM] Re: MARY ANN MIXER

                        Dave, I have been staring at Mary Ann off and on, (with vast envy),
                        flipping back and forth in the pictures. It's absolutely amazing! I
                        don't think anyone else had a complete double drive mixer! I also don't
                        recall seeing a mixer that mounted by the handle. There were flip-back
                        mixers about with no handles other than early Sunbeams-the GE gooseneck
                        49x390, the Dominion Modern Mode, the Pantry
                        Pet- but absolutely nothing like Mary Ann.
                        The large ridged mixfinder dial is super, and looks to be easier to see
                        and use than the Mixmaster's. Since you couldn't hold on to this mixer's
                        handle while turning, a smoother dial would have been a disadvantage.

                        Did you get any bowls other than the juicer? What does the handle appear
                        to be made of? It's amazing that the entire weight of the mixer is
                        trusted to rest on metal studs embedded in the handle. It doesn't look
                        like a light weight motor either. Can you imagine the advertising for
                        Mary Ann?? "This mixer stands on its head to please you!", or some such
                        variation.

                        Al, thanks for the Thorn reference!
                        The only Mary Ann I came up with in a kitchen context was the Mary Ann
                        eggbeater made by EKCO.
                        All I can say is WOW!!!!!!!!!!!!! Anyone who comes across anything about
                        Mary Ann, please tell us all. Nancy P.

                        --- In WACEM@yahoogroups.com, "m1xermaniac" <daveholden@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Gang
                        > Just found another odd mixer here downunder.
                        > Pics in a new album named MARY ANN MIXER.
                        > I googled it but couldnt find anything.
                        > The plate says it was made by Thorn in the UK.
                        > Anyone else seen one of these?
                        > Dave
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                        ------------------------------------

                        Yahoo! Groups Links





                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.