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The Worth of Cherry Blossoms - From the book "Kindness" WITH Visual

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  • wdestiny44@aol.com
    Really think about your work - And search for happiness. And then? Do all you can For those who haven t what you have. The Worth of Cherry Blossoms from the
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 1, 2007
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      Really think about your work -
      And search for happiness.
      And then?
      Do all you can
      For those who haven't what you have.

      The Worth of Cherry Blossoms from the book:
      "Kindness: A Treasury of Buddhist Wisdom for Children and Parents"
      collected and adapted by Sarah Conover

      In Japan two centuries ago, there lived a Buddhist nun named Rengetsu. Her
      life as a nun began tragically, after her husband and young children died. To
      support herself, she worked as a potter, a poet, and an artist. Her exquisite
      poetry gained her instant fame. She soon found herself moving from one home
      to the next, trying to avoid the constant press of customers.

      Although Japan named her a Patron Saint of the Arts, she never held on to
      the money her art brought in - she gave it to those who needed it most. More
      than a few times she parted with her warm kimono to a shivering street beggar.
      When a robber entered her home during the night, she lit a lamp for him to see
      by, then fixed the thief a cup of hot tea while inviting him to discuss his
      desperate situation.

      Rengetsu said she moved about like "a driifting cloud blown by a fierce wind."
      Her poems are fresh with images from journeys through forests and mountains.
      On one such pilgrimage to a remote region, she had hiked since noon without
      having passed through a single village. But at last, as dusk descended, she
      came upon a small settlement along a riverbank. She knocked upon the door
      of an inn, humbly asking for a night's lodging. But the inn was already full.

      As she rested, stars appeared out of the advancing darkness. The village
      grew steadily more quiet. The sounds of families enjoying their suppers faded
      into those of preparing for the night. Rengetsu was tired, but not discouraged.
      Beyond the town she had earlier spied a forgotten orchard with lush, soft grass
      beneath the trees. She retraced her steps down the road and bedded down for
      the night under a cherry tree.

      In the middle of the night, she senses a bright light upon her face. It awakened
      her. When her eyes opened, a hazy, snowy moon loomed in the cloudless sky.
      Directly above her, thousands of cherry blossoms had opened while she slept,
      and each flower now held bright moonlight in its petal cup. It was so lovely
      Rengetsu gasped. She bowed towards the village, giving thanks for this
      unexpected gift: a gift of nature far more meaningful than a comfortable night
      in a bed! Rengetsu then composed this poem:

      Through their
      Kindness in refusing
      Me lodging,

      I found myself
      Beneath the
      Beautiful blossoms

      On the night of the
      Misty moon.

      http://www.miksovsky.com/Japan/2000-04/Cherry%20Blossom%20Viewing.htm

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/VoicesOfThePhilosophersStone











      **************************************
      See what's free at http://www.aol.com.
    • kitsune miko
      Beautiful, both times. Thank you, Sandy ... -- Expectations are resentments under construction. -Anne Lamott-
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 1, 2007
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        Beautiful, both times.
         
        Thank you,
         
        Sandy

         
        On 4/1/07, wdestiny44@... <wdestiny44@...> wrote:


        Really think about your work -
        And search for happiness.
        And then?
        Do all you can
        For those who haven't what you have.

        The Worth of Cherry Blossoms from the book:
        "Kindness: A Treasury of Buddhist Wisdom for Children and Parents"
        collected and adapted by Sarah Conover

        In Japan two centuries ago, there lived a Buddhist nun named Rengetsu. Her
        life as a nun began tragically, after her husband and young children died. To
        support herself, she worked as a potter, a poet, and an artist. Her exquisite
        poetry gained her instant fame. She soon found herself moving from one home
        to the next, trying to avoid the constant press of customers.

        Although Japan named her a Patron Saint of the Arts, she never held on to
        the money her art brought in - she gave it to those who needed it most. More
        than a few times she parted with her warm kimono to a shivering street beggar.
        When a robber entered her home during the night, she lit a lamp for him to see
        by, then fixed the thief a cup of hot tea while inviting him to discuss his
        desperate situation.

        Rengetsu said she moved about like "a driifting cloud blown by a fierce wind."
        Her poems are fresh with images from journeys through forests and mountains.
        On one such pilgrimage to a remote region, she had hiked since noon without
        having passed through a single village. But at last, as dusk descended, she
        came upon a small settlement along a riverbank. She knocked upon the door
        of an inn, humbly asking for a night's lodging. But the inn was already full.

        As she rested, stars appeared out of the advancing darkness. The village
        grew steadily more quiet. The sounds of families enjoying their suppers faded
        into those of preparing for the night. Rengetsu was tired, but not discouraged.
        Beyond the town she had earlier spied a forgotten orchard with lush, soft grass
        beneath the trees. She retraced her steps down the road and bedded down for
        the night under a cherry tree.

        In the middle of the night, she senses a bright light upon her face. It awakened
        her. When her eyes opened, a hazy, snowy moon loomed in the cloudless sky.
        Directly above her, thousands of cherry blossoms had opened while she slept,
        and each flower now held bright moonlight in its petal cup. It was so lovely
        Rengetsu gasped. She bowed towards the village, giving thanks for this
        unexpected gift: a gift of nature far more meaningful than a comfortable night
        in a bed! Rengetsu then composed this poem:

        Through their
        Kindness in refusing
        Me lodging,

        I found myself
        Beneath the
        Beautiful blossoms

        On the night of the
        Misty moon.

        http://www.miksovsky.com/Japan/2000-04/Cherry%20Blossom%20Viewing.htm

        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/VoicesOfThePhilosophersStone











        **************************************
        See what's free at http://www.aol.com.



        --
        "Expectations are resentments under construction."

        -Anne Lamott-
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