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Re: [Venture24] Keel stop/lock bolt

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  • hwadler
    Say you are on the San Francisco bay (or Ocean) and get caught in some heavy winds and get knocked down. The keel slides up, you re not coming up. You lock the
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1 9:49 AM
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      Say you are on the San Francisco bay (or Ocean) and get caught in some heavy winds and get knocked down. The keel slides up, you're not coming up. You lock the keel down for safety. The designers did what they did for a reason. You can debate the issue all you want but you are not facing liability issues, unless you kill a passenger and their relatives sue you. :-(

      Herman

      Peter Merritt

      Cape Fear Automation, Inc.

      Office 910-259-4500

      Cell 910-232-7868

       

       


      -- 
      League of American Bicyclist
        League Cycling Instructor #1231
      www.wadler.org
    • Peter Merritt
      Each is to their own on this, but here is what I have experienced first hand: 1. Grounded on keel with waves coming for portside. Was able to raise keel
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 1 11:29 AM
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        Each is to their own on this, but here is what I have experienced first hand:
         
        1.  Grounded on keel with waves coming for portside.  Was able to raise keel quickly and avoid further grounding or collision with dock and other boats.  Disaster avoided.
         
        2.  Found myself in a storm where a wave tore the front hatch off, and the rudder brackets failed.  I was not going to last long with the open hatch as the cabin was filling with water.  Also there was no way I could leave the tiller to remove a keel bolt or fix the hatch.  I pulled the keel up and headed for shallow water and waited for calmer skis.  Disaster avoided.
         
        3.  In high seas the keel will swing back and forth as the boat rides up and down waves.  Once I could feel the keel bumping into the trunk with each wave.  A couple cranks on the winch to raise the keel a small amount solved the problem.
         
        4.  I have laid the boat down till water was coming in around the windows and chain plates and the keel did not move.  While I do agree that in a capsize the keel could swing back into the trunk, you would have to be much further over then 90 degrees.  What I don't agree with, is that this is even a problem.  Its at 90 degrees that the extended keel does the most work.  At 180 degrees or complete capsize there would be little difference between a retracted keel and an extended keel in terms of righting the boat.  In the event of a complete capsize there is going to be lots of problems to deal with least of which will be the keel.
         
        For safety I will never install the keel lock down bolt.  To hard to remove in a hurry.  Having a retractable keel offers a huge advantage over fixed keel boats, why give that up.  Do what you want, but I plugged the holes and sail with confidence.
         
        Pete
         
         
         
         
         

         

         
         
      • mike
        ... I have to agree with Pete on this one. I sail in north Texas and run into some shalow spots now and then. If I had the Keel lock bolt in place it would get
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 1 3:23 PM
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          --- In Venture24@yahoogroups.com, "Peter Merritt" <pmerritt@...> wrote:
          >
          > Each is to their own on this, but here is what I have experienced first
          > hand:
          >
          > 1. Grounded on keel with waves coming for portside. Was able to raise keel
          > quickly and avoid further grounding or collision with dock and other boats.
          > Disaster avoided.
          >
          > 2. Found myself in a storm where a wave tore the front hatch off, and the
          > rudder brackets failed. I was not going to last long with the open hatch as
          > the cabin was filling with water. Also there was no way I could leave the
          > tiller to remove a keel bolt or fix the hatch. I pulled the keel up and
          > headed for shallow water and waited for calmer skis. Disaster avoided.
          >
          > 3. In high seas the keel will swing back and forth as the boat rides up and
          > down waves. Once I could feel the keel bumping into the trunk with each
          > wave. A couple cranks on the winch to raise the keel a small amount solved
          > the problem.
          >
          > 4. I have laid the boat down till water was coming in around the windows
          > and chain plates and the keel did not move. While I do agree that in a
          > capsize the keel could swing back into the trunk, you would have to be much
          > further over then 90 degrees. What I don't agree with, is that this is even
          > a problem. Its at 90 degrees that the extended keel does the most work. At
          > 180 degrees or complete capsize there would be little difference between a
          > retracted keel and an extended keel in terms of righting the boat. In the
          > event of a complete capsize there is going to be lots of problems to deal
          > with least of which will be the keel.
          >
          > For safety I will never install the keel lock down bolt. To hard to remove
          > in a hurry. Having a retractable keel offers a huge advantage over fixed
          > keel boats, why give that up. Do what you want, but I plugged the holes and
          > sail with confidence.
          >
          > Pete
          >

          I have to agree with Pete on this one. I sail in north Texas and run into some shalow spots now and then. If I had the Keel lock bolt in place it would get stuck, without it in and some quick action from some of the crew on the winch has got me out of a pinch on many occasions without the lock bolt in place. The only time I had trouble was on a very windy day that I should have stayed home. We were clipping along pretty good when I hit something under water I think it was a tree. It almost stopped the boat, but not for long. As the keel slid up and over it I had a little tention on the keel cable and when it came off the log it cracked the board the winch was mounted to, frayed the cable a little, and bent the bolt that the keel cable runs across, and did i mention scared the hell out of me and the crew. I just cranked the keel way up past the fray in the cable and hoped the board didnt break sending the winch into the floor, and got back to the dock as fast as I could. I made a few improvements after I replaced all the broken stuff. I put heavy compression springs on the bolts that hold the winch to cushion a drop if it happends again, and put a nylon roller on the bolt that the keel cable runs across so the SS cable is not just sliding over a 3/8 bolt and now when I feel the slightest resistance as for as the keel dragging I get someone cranking on the winch to raise the keel so it wont crash down when it comes off what ever it is draggin on. I still maintain that I am a beginner and new to the sailing world and if anyone sees a problem with any of these improvements I am all ears and would like to hear if anyone thinks they are good ideas. sorry for the long windedness MIke G.
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