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Possible newbie

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  • amolitor55
    Just looked at a V 24 that needs lots of work. A friend of mine has had it for 10 years and has never put it in the water. The hull seems intact, but there
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 8, 2009
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      Just looked at a V 24 that needs lots of work. A friend of mine has had it for 10 years and has never put it in the water. The hull seems intact, but there are some cracks on the keel. I was thinking to offer him $1600 which would include a small Evinrude, the trailer, and one set of sails (if the jib is the right one.) We are moving to Montana soon and would love to have a sailboat for Flathead lake. I know I can do all of the work [former shop teacher] but is it worth it? Any comments/ideas/warnings?

      Thanks for you input.

      almo
    • chonebone
      ... The V24 is a reasonable size to work with, in case the boat needs paint, brightwork, etc. I would have a good look at the raised flooring inside. On one of
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 8, 2009
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        --- In Venture24@yahoogroups.com, "amolitor55" <amolitor@...> wrote:
        >
        > Just looked at a V 24 that needs lots of work. A friend of mine has had it for 10 years and has never put it in the water. The hull seems intact, but there are some cracks on the keel. I was thinking to offer him $1600 which would include a small Evinrude, the trailer, and one set of sails (if the jib is the right one.) We are moving to Montana soon and would love to have a sailboat for Flathead lake. I know I can do all of the work [former shop teacher] but is it worth it? Any comments/ideas/warnings?
        >
        > Thanks for you input.
        >
        > almo
        >Hi, possible newbie
        The V24 is a reasonable size to work with, in case the boat needs paint, brightwork, etc. I would have a good look at the raised flooring inside. On one of my V24s, that was left outdoors, the plywood flooring had rotted out. Not impossible to fix, but sort of a pain to grind off all the old fiberglass, and refit new plywood. Make sure that all the
        rigging and hardware are present. Check for complete, usable sails. These are the high cost replacement parts. The rest is mostly labor.
        The cracks on the keel could be cosmetically repaired quite easily, but a bonafide repair will be an effort. The keel is a piece of 1" thick steel, about 6" wide, and six ft. long, with some lead bars bolted on the bottom. Then the whole thing is encapsulated in fiberglass and resin. Water gets in between the steel and the glass, and the expanding rust cracks the glass. It will work with cracks, but at some point, it expands enought to get tight in the keel well.
        Fortunately, there is a lot of helpful advice available for any issue that may come up. I would say its a decent price, if the interior wood is not rotten, and the plywood in the cabintop and deck is sound. Also, its a good deal if you enjoy boat fixin, like I do.
        Good luck.
        Brian
      • fuller630
        Good advice. First plan on new tires and pack the wheel bearings if you are moving any distance. Check in the links for some good info. I need a set of
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 9, 2009
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          Good advice. First plan on new tires and pack the wheel bearings if you are moving any distance. Check in the links for some good info. I need a set of sails when I get done. They start at $1,000 for oem quality and go up to about $1,500 for very good ones.





          > >Hi, possible newbie
          > The V24 is a reasonable size to work with, in case the boat needs paint, brightwork, etc. I would have a good look at the raised flooring inside. On one of my V24s, that was left outdoors, the plywood flooring had rotted out. Not impossible to fix, but sort of a pain to grind off all the old fiberglass, and refit new plywood. Make sure that all the
          > rigging and hardware are present. Check for complete, usable sails. These are the high cost replacement parts. The rest is mostly labor.
          > The cracks on the keel could be cosmetically repaired quite easily, but a bonafide repair will be an effort. The keel is a piece of 1" thick steel, about 6" wide, and six ft. long, with some lead bars bolted on the bottom. Then the whole thing is encapsulated in fiberglass and resin. Water gets in between the steel and the glass, and the expanding rust cracks the glass. It will work with cracks, but at some point, it expands enought to get tight in the keel well.
          > Fortunately, there is a lot of helpful advice available for any issue that may come up. I would say its a decent price, if the interior wood is not rotten, and the plywood in the cabintop and deck is sound. Also, its a good deal if you enjoy boat fixin, like I do.
          > Good luck.
          > Brian
          >
        • bjslife
          Hello all, hey ive been reading about everyone buying sails that are exspensive but i bought my main sail for $54 used with slight stains at this web site
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 9, 2009
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            Hello all, hey ive been reading about everyone buying sails that are exspensive but i bought my main sail for $54 used with slight stains at this web site http://www.minneysyachtsurplus.com/ I kept checking back and sure enough they had one my size. just some info to help the fellom sailer save some money and get out there and sail.
          • chonebone
            ... I wish there were more places like it! Brian
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 9, 2009
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              --- In Venture24@yahoogroups.com, "bjslife" <bjslife@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello all, hey ive been reading about everyone buying sails that are exspensive but i bought my main sail for $54 used with slight stains at this web site http://www.minneysyachtsurplus.com/ I kept checking back and sure enough they had one my size. just some info to help the fellom sailer save some money and get out there and sail.
              >I get the feeling that most of you are from the east coast, but if you ever get a chance to visit Minney's Yacht Surplus in California, it's worth a good, long stay. They have everything you might want for a boat, most of it used. They have thousands of sails, masts, rigging, stainless fasteners sold by the pound. I wish it was closer to my place ( it's about a 3 hr drive) Every time I go there, I have a BIG shopping list, and I come home dirty and happy.
              I wish there were more places like it!
              Brian
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