Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: New Member - Stan

Expand Messages
  • Mark 42
    I wonder if rubber raft material would be any good. It s tough and flexible with only some stretchiness.
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      I wonder if rubber raft material would be any good.

      It's tough and flexible with only some stretchiness.



      --- In VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Linder" <linder@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello Stan and welcome:
      >
      >
      >
      > The following is based on my experience, research and having built two large
      > VDGs.
      >
      >
      >
      > Stay away from black material. Most black rubber is not appropriate since
      > conductive carbon is usually part of the mix.
      >
      > My best result has been with vinyl impregnated nylon. It does not stretch
      > and tracks with rollers which have been slightly crowned. Some of the folks
      > on the forum have also used this material with good luck. The ends can be
      > solvent "welded" with acetone based cement. Years ago, I obtained this
      > material from McMaster Carr Co. (on the web).
      >
      >
      >
      > Belt speed is a result of motor RPM and the ratios of any drive pulleys you
      > may be using in the drive system. My motors are also 10,000 rpm but were
      > chosen mainly for the 1/3 HP rating. Since this is a universal motor (with
      > brushes) it runs well with any kind of a speed controller. My final belt
      > speed is about 60 miles per hour.
      >
      >
      >
      > Think of the belt as a conveyor belt. It is carrying electrons up to the top
      > terminal. Within reasonable limits a wide/fast belt can carry more
      > electrons (per second) then a narrow/sow belt. Of course there are other
      > factors which determine the optimum belt width and speed.
      >
      >
      >
      > The other factors include electrical isolation of the top terminal from
      > ground and the terminal diameter. The column dimensions and column material
      > will greatly influence leakage to ground Think about the column as a
      > resistor which is bleeding some of the charge to ground. Obviously the
      > choice and dimensions of the column should present as high a resistance (as
      > practical) for the lowest leakage. My first generator uses a 6" diameter
      > plexi tube about 36" long and the terminal is 18" in diameter. On a dry day
      > 14" sparks were typical. The large VDG is about 8 feet high and has a 36
      > inch diameter terminal. For the "column" I used four supporting fiberglass
      > legs instead of a closed column. Firstly, less material (area) in the column
      > relates to higher resistance to ground and lower leakage. Second, cleaning
      > the "column" is much easier than a closed tube. Dirty column=high leakage.
      > This VDG will produce 25" to 30" sparks
      >
      >
      >
      > I hope some of this info has helped. Realize that the VDG is a system with
      > many mechanical and electrical elements that have to be compatible. Take a
      > look at my photos of the guts of my 2 VDGs for some ideas that might help..
      >
      >
      >
      > Best wishes, Dick Linder
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > _____
      >
      > From: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com
      > [mailto:VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of brewers_2150
      > Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2011 3:59 PM
      > To: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: [VanDeGraaffGenerator] New Member - Stan
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hello, I'm a new member on this group.
      > I've got most of the parts and am about to start building my first Van de
      > Graph machine.
      > I've seen most of the articles and have seen some contradictions, so I'm
      > looking for advice from people who have actual experience in building and/or
      > modifying a machine.
      >
      > 1st issue. Do not use black rubber. Some say it's o.k. others say
      > no, what's the real scoop?
      > 2nd issue. Motor speed has nothing to do with voltage output.
      > 3rd issue. Height of tube increases the voltage output.
      >
      > Question, will a wider belt yield more voltage?
      >
      > So far, I've got:
      > 1. A 1/3 hp motor with about 10,000 RPM
      > 2. Several Rubber belts about 4 inch wide by 48 inch long.
      > 3. A 3 foot clear plastic tube.
      > 4. A 9 inch hollow aluminum sphere.
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Stan
      >
    • Richard Linder
      During the months and months of designing and prototyping the first generator I tried countless possible belt materials. My trash barrel was witness to that!
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 3, 2011
      • 0 Attachment

        During the months and months of designing and prototyping the first generator I tried countless possible belt materials. My trash barrel was witness to that!

         

        Dick Linder

         


        From: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com [mailto:VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark 42
        Sent: Thursday, December 01, 2011 2:49 PM
        To: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [VanDeGraaffGenerator] Re: New Member - Stan

         

         

        I wonder if rubber raft material would be any good.

        It's tough and flexible with only some stretchiness.

        --- In VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com, "Richard Linder" <linder@...> wrote:

        >
        > Hello Stan and welcome:
        >
        >
        >
        > The following is based on my experience, research and having built two
        large
        > VDGs.
        >
        >
        >
        > Stay away from black material. Most black rubber is not appropriate since
        > conductive carbon is usually part of the mix.
        >
        > My best result has been with vinyl impregnated nylon. It does not stretch
        > and tracks with rollers which have been slightly crowned. Some of the
        folks
        > on the forum have also used this material with good luck. The ends can be
        > solvent "welded" with acetone based cement. Years ago, I
        obtained this
        > material from McMaster Carr Co. (on the web).
        >
        >
        >
        > Belt speed is a result of motor RPM and the ratios of any drive pulleys
        you
        > may be using in the drive system. My motors are also 10,000 rpm but were
        > chosen mainly for the 1/3 HP rating. Since this is a universal motor (with
        > brushes) it runs well with any kind of a speed controller. My final belt
        > speed is about 60 miles per hour.
        >
        >
        >
        > Think of the belt as a conveyor belt. It is carrying electrons up to the
        top
        > terminal. Within reasonable limits a wide/fast belt can carry more
        > electrons (per second) then a narrow/sow belt. Of course there are other
        > factors which determine the optimum belt width and speed.
        >
        >
        >
        > The other factors include electrical isolation of the top terminal from
        > ground and the terminal diameter. The column dimensions and column
        material
        > will greatly influence leakage to ground Think about the column as a
        > resistor which is bleeding some of the charge to ground. Obviously the
        > choice and dimensions of the column should present as high a resistance
        (as
        > practical) for the lowest leakage. My first generator uses a 6"
        diameter
        > plexi tube about 36" long and the terminal is 18" in diameter.
        On a dry day
        > 14" sparks were typical. The large VDG is about 8 feet high and has a
        36
        > inch diameter terminal. For the "column" I used four supporting
        fiberglass
        > legs instead of a closed column. Firstly, less material (area) in the
        column
        > relates to higher resistance to ground and lower leakage. Second, cleaning
        > the "column" is much easier than a closed tube. Dirty
        column=high leakage.
        > This VDG will produce 25" to 30" sparks
        >
        >
        >
        > I hope some of this info has helped. Realize that the VDG is a system with
        > many mechanical and electrical elements that have to be compatible. Take a
        > look at my photos of the guts of my 2 VDGs for some ideas that might
        help..
        >
        >
        >
        > Best wishes, Dick Linder
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _____
        >
        > From: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com]
        On Behalf Of brewers_2150
        > Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2011 3:59 PM
        > To: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [VanDeGraaffGenerator] New Member - Stan
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hello, I'm a new member on this group.
        > I've got most of the parts and am about to start building my first Van de
        > Graph machine.
        > I've seen most of the articles and have seen some contradictions, so I'm
        > looking for advice from people who have actual experience in building
        and/or
        > modifying a machine.
        >
        > 1st issue. Do not use black rubber. Some say it's o.k. others say
        > no, what's the real scoop?
        > 2nd issue. Motor speed has nothing to do with voltage output.
        > 3rd issue. Height of tube increases the voltage output.
        >
        > Question, will a wider belt yield more voltage?
        >
        > So far, I've got:
        > 1. A 1/3 hp motor with about 10,000 RPM
        > 2. Several Rubber belts about 4 inch wide by 48 inch long.
        > 3. A 3 foot clear plastic tube.
        > 4. A 9 inch hollow aluminum sphere.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Stan
        >

      • Stan Brewer
        Has anybody seen that poor looking Van De Graaff Generator in Study, Measure, Expermint: Stories of Scientfic Equipment at Dartmouth Colledge ? It s about
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 4, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Has anybody seen that poor looking Van De Graaff Generator in "Study, Measure, Expermint: Stories of Scientfic Equipment at Dartmouth Colledge" ?  It's about as rough machine as I"ve seen.

                                Stan


          Richard Linder wrote:
           

          Hello Stan and welcome:

           

          The following is based on my experience, research and having built two large VDGs.

           

          Stay away from black material. Most black rubber is not appropriate since conductive carbon is usually part of the mix.

          My best result has been with vinyl impregnated nylon. It does not stretch and tracks with rollers which have been slightly crowned. Some of the folks on the forum have also used this material with good luck. The ends can be solvent “welded” with acetone based cement. Years ago, I obtained this material from McMaster Carr Co. (on the web).

           

          Belt speed is a result of motor RPM and the ratios of any drive pulleys you may be using in the drive system. My motors are also 10,000 rpm but were chosen mainly for the 1/3 HP rating. Since this is a universal motor (with brushes) it runs well with any kind of a speed controller. My final belt speed is about 60 miles per hour.

           

          Think of the belt as a conveyor belt. It is carrying electrons up to the top terminal.  Within reasonable limits a wide/fast belt can carry more electrons (per second) then a narrow/sow belt. Of course there are other factors which determine the optimum belt width and speed.

           

          The other factors include electrical isolation of the top terminal from ground and the terminal diameter. The column dimensions and column material will greatly influence leakage to ground Think about the column as a resistor which is bleeding some of the charge to ground. Obviously the choice and dimensions of the column should present as high a resistance (as practical) for the lowest leakage.  My first generator uses a 6” diameter plexi tube about 36” long and the terminal is 18” in diameter. On a dry day 14” sparks were typical. The large VDG is about 8 feet high and has a 36 inch diameter terminal. For the “column” I used four supporting fiberglass legs instead of a closed column. Firstly, less material (area) in the column relates to higher resistance to ground and lower leakage. Second, cleaning the “column” is much easier than a closed tube. Dirty column=high leakage. This VDG will produce 25” to 30” sparks

           

          I hope some of this info has helped. Realize that the VDG is a system with many mechanical and electrical elements that have to be compatible. Take a look at my photos of the guts of my 2 VDGs for some ideas that might help..

           

          Best wishes, Dick Linder

           

           


          From: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com [mailto:VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of brewers_2150
          Sent: Tuesday, November 29, 2011 3:59 PM
          To: VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [VanDeGraaffGenerator] New Member - Stan

           

           

          Hello, I'm a new member on this group.
          I've got most of the parts and am about to start building my first Van de Graph machine.
          I've seen most of the articles and have seen some contradictions, so I'm looking for advice from people who have actual experience in building and/or modifying a machine.

          1st issue. Do not use black rubber. Some say it's o.k. others say
          no, what's the real scoop?
          2nd issue. Motor speed has nothing to do with voltage output.
          3rd issue. Height of tube increases the voltage output.

          Question, will a wider belt yield more voltage?

          So far, I've got:
          1. A 1/3 hp motor with about 10,000 RPM
          2. Several Rubber belts about 4 inch wide by 48 inch long.
          3. A 3 foot clear plastic tube.
          4. A 9 inch hollow aluminum sphere.

          Thanks,
          Stan

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.