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VDG for diabetes?

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  • jacobsmach
    I was searching Google patents for electrostatic generators and came across a 1991 US patent (link below) for a method of reducing blood glucose using a VDG.
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 20, 2009
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      I was searching Google patents for electrostatic generators and came
      across a 1991 US patent (link below) for a method of reducing blood
      glucose using a VDG. According to the patent, a person with high blood
      glucose stands on an insulated platform and holds the HV terminal of a
      VDG. This is the same setup as for hair raising. The method will not
      reduce blood glucose below normal levels in either diabetics or
      non-diabetics.

      I was recently diagnosed as a type-2 diabetic, and I have a blood
      glucose meter. That, and a VDG completes the equipment to give it a
      try, which I plan to do after establishing some non-electrified
      base-line data.

      Non-diabetics will self-correct for high blood sugar, so this
      experiment is only for those who can become hyperglycemic, that is,
      diabetics. Who would have thought that diabetes would enable some fun
      high-voltage experimentation? Talk about making lemonade when life
      gives you lemons!

      Don Jacobs

      http://www.google.com/patents?id=LhIgAAAAEBAJ&dq=van+de+graaff+generator
    • Steve
      I have a hard time believing this. It seems like quack medicine, like those violet ray quack machines. Can you find some publications in medical journals, or
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 21, 2009
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        I have a hard time believing this. It seems like quack medicine, like
        those "violet ray" quack machines.

        Can you find some publications in medical journals, or any evidence
        of credible blind tests?

        Steve Greenfield

        --- In VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com, "jacobsmach"
        <hihoag@...> wrote:
        >
        > I was searching Google patents for electrostatic generators and came
        > across a 1991 US patent (link below) for a method of reducing blood
        > glucose using a VDG. According to the patent, a person with high
        blood
        > glucose stands on an insulated platform and holds the HV terminal
        of a
        > VDG. This is the same setup as for hair raising. The method will not
        > reduce blood glucose below normal levels in either diabetics or
        > non-diabetics.
        >
        > I was recently diagnosed as a type-2 diabetic, and I have a blood
        > glucose meter. That, and a VDG completes the equipment to give it a
        > try, which I plan to do after establishing some non-electrified
        > base-line data.
        >
        > Non-diabetics will self-correct for high blood sugar, so this
        > experiment is only for those who can become hyperglycemic, that is,
        > diabetics. Who would have thought that diabetes would enable some
        fun
        > high-voltage experimentation? Talk about making lemonade when life
        > gives you lemons!
        >
        > Don Jacobs
        >
        > http://www.google.com/patents?id=LhIgAAAAEBAJ&dq=van+de+graaff
        +generator
        >
      • jacobsmach
        Steve, When I first saw the patent, I assumed it was a Victorian-age invention that was granted when electricity was promoted as a cure-all. The violet ray
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 21, 2009
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          Steve,

          When I first saw the patent, I assumed it was a Victorian-age
          invention that was granted when electricity was promoted as a
          cure-all. The "violet ray device" and several "medical coils" were
          probably created then. The 1991 date of this patent gave it enough
          credibility to look into it further. I will ask my doctor it, and seek
          reports in more-credible medical journals.

          One of the problems with this patent, from a marketing viewpoint, is
          that anyone could do it. No special equipment or medication is
          required. As long as nobody made money selling electrostatic
          treatments for high blood sugar, the patent would not be violated.
          It's kind of like the lack of funding in the drug industry for herbal
          medication research... It's difficult to make money, even of it works.

          Don Jacobs

          P.S the violet ray seems to enjoy more popularity among the S-M crowd
          than in the medical community these days.

          --- In VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com, "Steve" <alienrelics@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > I have a hard time believing this. It seems like quack medicine, like
          > those "violet ray" quack machines.
          >
          > Can you find some publications in medical journals, or any evidence
          > of credible blind tests?
          >
          > Steve Greenfield
          >
          > --- In VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com, "jacobsmach"
          > <hihoag@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I was searching Google patents for electrostatic generators and came
          > > across a 1991 US patent (link below) for a method of reducing blood
          > > glucose using a VDG. According to the patent, a person with high
          > blood
          > > glucose stands on an insulated platform and holds the HV terminal
          > of a
          > > VDG. This is the same setup as for hair raising. The method will not
          > > reduce blood glucose below normal levels in either diabetics or
          > > non-diabetics.
          > >
          > > I was recently diagnosed as a type-2 diabetic, and I have a blood
          > > glucose meter. That, and a VDG completes the equipment to give it a
          > > try, which I plan to do after establishing some non-electrified
          > > base-line data.
          > >
          > > Non-diabetics will self-correct for high blood sugar, so this
          > > experiment is only for those who can become hyperglycemic, that is,
          > > diabetics. Who would have thought that diabetes would enable some
          > fun
          > > high-voltage experimentation? Talk about making lemonade when life
          > > gives you lemons!
          > >
          > > Don Jacobs
          > >
          > > http://www.google.com/patents?id=LhIgAAAAEBAJ&dq=van+de+graaff
          > +generator
          > >
          >
        • Steve
          ... There is a guy who managed to patent several flying saucer propulsion/anti-gravity devices, too. But they are really just high-voltage lifters. ... I hear
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 22, 2009
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            --- In VanDeGraaffGenerator@yahoogroups.com, "jacobsmach" <hihoag@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Steve,
            >
            > When I first saw the patent, I assumed it was a Victorian-age
            > invention that was granted when electricity was promoted as a
            > cure-all. The "violet ray device" and several "medical coils" were
            > probably created then. The 1991 date of this patent gave it enough
            > credibility to look into it further. I will ask my doctor it, and seek
            > reports in more-credible medical journals.

            There is a guy who managed to patent several flying saucer
            propulsion/anti-gravity devices, too. But they are really just
            high-voltage lifters.

            > One of the problems with this patent, from a marketing viewpoint, is
            > that anyone could do it. No special equipment or medication is
            > required. As long as nobody made money selling electrostatic
            > treatments for high blood sugar, the patent would not be violated.
            > It's kind of like the lack of funding in the drug industry for herbal
            > medication research... It's difficult to make money, even of it works.

            I hear you.

            However, they manage to make money from UV exposure machines. They
            have benefits for people with certain skin conditions, such as
            psoriasis. A friend of mine can't get the treatments because the local
            Army medical facility can't or won't afford the $20,000+ price tag for
            what is essentially a medically certified super-powerful tanning bed.
            I keep trying to convince her to just buy her own tanning bed. She'll
            have to lay in it a bit longer, but it does the same thing with a bit
            more safety.

            > Don Jacobs
            >
            > P.S the violet ray seems to enjoy more popularity among the S-M crowd
            > than in the medical community these days.

            S and M? So... that's really wanting to hurt someone on a delayed
            basis, by giving them a melanoma?

            The patent seems to be building on research involving direct
            electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Presumably that works by
            altering the electro-chemical balance of the cells that produce
            insulin. But if you Google for research, you find a -lot- of results
            involving the same direct stimulation in other parts of the body.
            Altering the blood-brain permeability, for instance. So you are
            potentially messing with every cell in your body.

            Or, since excess charge stays on the outside of a charged object, you
            are messing only with your skin cells and nothing inside.

            Steve Greenfield
          • jacobsmach
            Steve Greenfield Wrote: (snip) ... All your points are valid. I figure that, since no reports of harmful effects of the hair-raising VDG demonstration have
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 23, 2009
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              Steve Greenfield Wrote:
              (snip)
              > The patent seems to be building on research involving direct
              > electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Presumably that works by
              > altering the electro-chemical balance of the cells that produce
              > insulin. But if you Google for research, you find a -lot- of results
              > involving the same direct stimulation in other parts of the body.
              > Altering the blood-brain permeability, for instance. So you are
              > potentially messing with every cell in your body.
              >
              > Or, since excess charge stays on the outside of a charged object, you
              > are messing only with your skin cells and nothing inside.

              All your points are valid. I figure that, since no reports of harmful
              effects of the "hair-raising" VDG demonstration have surfaced, this
              method of reducing blood glucose is is probably safe. If it turns out
              to be bogus... no harm done. If it does cause problems, everyone here
              should be warned against the hair-raising thing. I feel safe giving it
              a try.

              Don Jacobs
            • WDOUGWILDER@wmconnect.com
              couldnt hurt to try it just don t stop your meds
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 24, 2009
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                couldnt hurt to try it just don't stop your meds
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