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Signal near 10 KHz

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  • Marcos Roberto Kusnick
    Hi everyone. I Just uploaded a screen shot where appears a strong signal near 10Khz. Does someone know what is it? Greetings, Marcos K
    Message 1 of 5 , May 2, 2007
      Hi everyone. I Just uploaded a screen shot where appears a strong
      signal near 10Khz. Does someone know what is it?
      Greetings,
      Marcos K
    • Edgar
      -- - In VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com, Marcos Roberto Kusnick ... I d be suspicious of hetrodyne between the carriers from two AM radio stations.
      Message 2 of 5 , May 2, 2007
        --

        - In VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com, "Marcos Roberto Kusnick" <kusnick@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hi everyone. I Just uploaded a screen shot where appears a strong
        > signal near 10Khz. Does someone know what is it?
        > Greetings,
        > Marcos K

        I'd be suspicious of hetrodyne between the carriers from
        two AM radio stations.
        Edgar
        >
      • Jara
        ... Hi Marcos do you think this?: http://krysatec-labs.benghi.org/phprs/images/200705021106_2.png And: I have not two strong MW or other stations here... Jara
        Message 3 of 5 , May 2, 2007
          --- In VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com, "Marcos Roberto Kusnick" <kusnick@.
          ..> wrote:
          >
          > Hi everyone. I Just uploaded a screen shot where appears a strong
          > signal near 10Khz. Does someone know what is it?
          > Greetings,
          > Marcos K
          >

          Hi Marcos

          do you think this?:
          http://krysatec-labs.benghi.org/phprs/images/200705021106_2.png

          And: I have not two strong MW or other stations here...

          Jara "rat"
        • Alan Melia
          Hi VLF sweeps are ful of artifacts like that. One of the skills you must learn is how to identify the source of the signal, because few if any others will be
          Message 4 of 5 , May 3, 2007
            Hi VLF sweeps are ful of artifacts like that. One of the skills you must
            learn is how to identify the source of the signal, because few if any others
            will be able to see it.

            It is probably not BC station intermodulatiom, because BC staions are
            allocated frequencies on a 9khz grid in Europe. Also an intermod product
            would carry the modulation of both the mixing signals, so the line would be
            wider.

            A narrow stable line like that is more likely to generated within a PC or
            similar controller circuit with a crystal clock. It is too stable for a
            switching power supply. You will need some form of loop antenna which will
            give a null when pointed at the signal, this will show you the approximate
            direction of the source. If you cannot get a null it may be radiated from
            the power supply feed lines or maybe telephone lines and has a wide
            "source". Ideally you need to look for it at a different location as well.
            You also need to monitor its strength and see if there is any difference
            between day and night. this will indicate whether it is local (steady
            strength) or received from a distance (stronger at night, possibly with
            fading)

            Few of us can help with signals like this, for they generally tend to be
            generated local to you either from your own domestic equipment of that od a
            near neighbour.

            Best Wished de Alan G3NYK

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Jara <krysatec@...>
            To: <VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: 03 May 2007 05:50
            Subject: [VLF_Group] Re: Signal near 10 KHz


            > --- In VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com, "Marcos Roberto Kusnick" <kusnick@.
            > ..> wrote:
            > >
            > > Hi everyone. I Just uploaded a screen shot where appears a strong
            > > signal near 10Khz. Does someone know what is it?
            > > Greetings,
            > > Marcos K
            > >
            >
            > Hi Marcos
            >
            > do you think this?:
            > http://krysatec-labs.benghi.org/phprs/images/200705021106_2.png
            >
            > And: I have not two strong MW or other stations here...
            >
            > Jara "rat"
            >
            >
            >
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          • Manfred Kerckhoff
            Perfect explanation. Marcos, as a rule of thumb: what you can t see at http://webflash.ess.washington.edu/ is surely local. Go to Moscow or Sheffield.
            Message 5 of 5 , May 3, 2007
              Perfect explanation.
              Marcos, as a rule of thumb: what you can't see at
              http://webflash.ess.washington.edu/
              is surely local. Go to Moscow or Sheffield. Sodankylä shows artefacts
              like yours. They are due to piles of computer installation underneath
              the antenna. Or look at Davis at 13k8 ...

              Good signal hunting.
              Manfred


              At 11:47 03.05.2007, you wrote:

              >Hi VLF sweeps are ful of artifacts like that. One of the skills you must
              >learn is how to identify the source of the signal, because few if any others
              >will be able to see it.
              >
              >It is probably not BC station intermodulatiom, because BC staions are
              >allocated frequencies on a 9khz grid in Europe. Also an intermod product
              >would carry the modulation of both the mixing signals, so the line would be
              >wider.
              >
              >A narrow stable line like that is more likely to generated within a PC or
              >similar controller circuit with a crystal clock. It is too stable for a
              >switching power supply. You will need some form of loop antenna which will
              >give a null when pointed at the signal, this will show you the approximate
              >direction of the source. If you cannot get a null it may be radiated from
              >the power supply feed lines or maybe telephone lines and has a wide
              >"source". Ideally you need to look for it at a different location as well.
              >You also need to monitor its strength and see if there is any difference
              >between day and night. this will indicate whether it is local (steady
              >strength) or received from a distance (stronger at night, possibly with
              >fading)
              >
              >Few of us can help with signals like this, for they generally tend to be
              >generated local to you either from your own domestic equipment of that od a
              >near neighbour.
              >
              >Best Wished de Alan G3NYK
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