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Re: Lightning detector based on DSP

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  • jjnews2000
    Thansk everyone for your answers. MArk, your detector seems to be very interesting. Above all because it uses a processor, which is very rare in the existing
    Message 1 of 38 , Mar 31, 2004
      Thansk everyone for your answers.


      MArk, your detector seems to be very interesting. Above all because
      it uses a processor, which is very rare in the existing lightning
      detectors over the world.

      > The simplest way to detect the lightning strike is using
      circuitry to detect
      > how strong the strike is, very few components needed.
      > On detecting a strike the processor takes the voltage level
      reading
      > (strength) & adds a number into a variable.

      That's what i want to do. But in order to determine the distance
      from the measured voltage, we must know the relation between the
      distance of a storm and the voltage we measure at reception. Do you
      know this relation? I searched everywhere on the net and didn't find
      it. How do you concretely calculate the distance?

      > After counting these strikes for 4 minutes (i chose 4 minutes, you
      could
      > choose 1 minute ect), depending on the value counted depends on
      how many led's
      > it lights up.

      I don't understand why you count the strikes. Could you explain ?

      > I'm actually using my VLF antennae for this, a handheld device
      with a
      > telescopic whip could be used but that means having a whip stuck
      out while your
      > walking around.
      > There are small handheld devices for sale that use led's to warn
      you of
      > incoming lightning which don't have an antennae sticking out, they
      must use a
      > small wound coil instead of a whip (i think).

      The antenna i have to use is an antenna based on a "baton de
      ferrite" in french. I'm not a specialist about antennas so i can't
      tell you what it is exactly.


      > Using DSP in a handheld device i would imagine to be quite
      difficult for an
      > amateur, maybe someone in this group could help you more there.

      As far as DSP is concerned, i know how to use it. I already worked
      on it so the issue doesn't really comes from the DSP. The issue is
      how to calculate this famous distance!

      > I just thought i'd give you my idea using a processor chip as it's
      very easy
      > & upto now the one i have built & been testing for a few days
      seems to be
      > working good.

      Thanks for your help. It's very interesting. Can you give more
      details about your device?

      Thanks again. (to everyone who answered to my query).
    • thierry alves
      Hello, I used a simple relation that gives the distance thanks to the dispersion of a tweek, you can see it at: www.vlf.it/thierry/waveguide_propagation.html .
      Message 38 of 38 , Apr 7, 2004
        Hello,
        I used a simple relation that gives the distance thanks to the dispersion of
        a tweek, you can see it at: www.vlf.it/thierry/waveguide_propagation.html .
        Maybe, it can be done with a DSP...

        Thanks, from Thierry.

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