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Re:TFK Anomoly ?

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  • dave
    When were you in Iceland and did you know or hear of a Sgt. Raymond? Dave
    Message 1 of 25 , Feb 1, 2010
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      When were you in Iceland and did you know or hear of a Sgt. Raymond?
      Dave

      --- In VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com, Walter Treftz <sjotrollet@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thats like the one in Iceland exept we didn't have the brass rail. Looks like banks of Westinghouse MW-2 HF xmtrs in the background. We had a slew of them also there. I maybe almost might have met him in Greenland as I was given a choice of posting to Thule or Keflavik and (rightly) chose Iceland since I knew there were girls in one place and none at the other (gimme a break, I was 21 at the time)
      >
      > --- On Sun, 1/31/10, Paul <paul@...> wrote:
      >
      > From: Paul <paul@...>
      > Subject: Re: [VLF_Group] Re:TFK Anomoly ?
      > To: VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Sunday, January 31, 2010, 2:14 AM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > You know you're dealing with a Transmitter when the
      >
      > PA and PSU have separate rooms and the loading coils
      >
      > have their own houses!
      >
      >
      >
      > Here is a photo of an AN/FRT-4 that Walter mentioned,
      >
      >
      >
      > http://www.virhisto ry.com/navy/ xmtrs/frt4- 02.jpg
      >
      >
      >
      > Drool!!
      >
      >
      >
      > Snippets from the same site...
      >
      >
      >
      > "...we learned that the narrow shift FSK keying put the
      >
      > carrier alternately on either side of the center of the
      >
      > tuned system."
      >
      >
      >
      > "The antenna was one mile long, about 800 to 1200 feet up,
      >
      > and was tuned with a massive inductor made of five inch
      >
      > diameter Litz wire."
      >
      >
      >
      > More to drool over, some antenna patching 'panels' used
      >
      > in shore stations,
      >
      >
      >
      > http://www.virhisto ry.com/navy/ xmtrs/tuner/ xmtr-patch- 02.JPG
      >
      > http://www.virhisto ry.com/navy/ xmtrs/tuner/ xmtr-patch- 01.JPG
      >
      >
      >
      > Another engineer writes about his time at Thule,
      >
      >
      >
      > "An interesting transmitter (FRT-4) we used for an
      >
      > unspecified purpose was this huge "walk-in" high powered
      >
      > transmitter (55 kw) built by General Electric. It had a
      >
      > brass rail in front of it and those so incline could stand
      >
      > at the rail and look at the powerful vacuum tubes glowing
      >
      > in the window. For electronics technicians that was the
      >
      > next best thing to TV. The antenna for this transmitter
      >
      > was 50 feet (15 m) taller than the Empire State Building -
      >
      > something over 1240 feet tall. It was the tallest antenna
      >
      > in the world for many years, until larger TV antennas
      >
      > were constructed. High winds across the antenna created
      >
      > so much static electricity that blue arcs were common
      >
      > on the transmission line inside the building and jumping
      >
      > across the antenna insulators outside that were rated at
      >
      > 1 million volts."
      >
      >
      >
      > More from that fellow at http://thulegreenla ndsite.com/
      >
      >
      >
      > It must have been impressive when everything was working fine,
      >
      > must have been *very* impressive when anything went wrong!
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks Walter for sharing a few memories. You should put
      >
      > them all on a website!
      >
      > --
      >
      > Paul Nicholson
      >
      > --
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Walter Treftz
      I was there (Grindavik) from Xmas of 58 to Xmas of 59 the first time and (and believe it or not volunteered to return) in 60 for about 8 months. 2nd time I
      Message 2 of 25 , Feb 1, 2010
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        I was there (Grindavik) from Xmas of '58 to Xmas of '59 the first time and (and believe it or not volunteered to return) in '60 for about 8 months. 2nd time I was assigned to Project Quickfix which was basically involved in getting the military HF A/G comm systems converted to SSB. WX was nasty usually but Reykjavik was delightful in contrast to US cities.
           Sorry, didn't know your friend (at least not well as don't recall the name). If he was in AACS outfit, maybe he was at the rcvr site or in the comm center down on the base.
        73
        Walt

        --- On Mon, 2/1/10, dave <e_trician@...> wrote:

        From: dave <e_trician@...>
        Subject: [VLF_Group] Re:TFK Anomoly ?
        To: VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, February 1, 2010, 3:07 AM







         









        When were you in Iceland and did you know or hear of a Sgt. Raymond?

        Dave



        --- In VLF_Group@yahoogrou ps.com, Walter Treftz <sjotrollet@ ...> wrote:

        >

        > Thats like the one in Iceland exept we didn't have the brass rail. Looks like banks of Westinghouse MW-2 HF xmtrs in the background. We had a slew of them also there. I maybe almost might have met him in Greenland as I was given a choice of posting to Thule or Keflavik and (rightly) chose Iceland since I knew there were girls in one place and none at the other (gimme a break, I was 21 at the time)

        >

        > --- On Sun, 1/31/10, Paul <paul@...> wrote:

        >

        > From: Paul <paul@...>

        > Subject: Re: [VLF_Group] Re:TFK Anomoly ?

        > To: VLF_Group@yahoogrou ps.com

        > Date: Sunday, January 31, 2010, 2:14 AM

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >  

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        > You know you're dealing with a Transmitter when the

        >

        > PA and PSU have separate rooms and the loading coils

        >

        > have their own houses!

        >

        >

        >

        > Here is a photo of an AN/FRT-4 that Walter mentioned,

        >

        >

        >

        > http://www.virhisto ry.com/navy/ xmtrs/frt4- 02.jpg

        >

        >

        >

        > Drool!!

        >

        >

        >

        > Snippets from the same site...

        >

        >

        >

        > "...we learned that the narrow shift FSK keying put the

        >

        > carrier alternately on either side of the center of the

        >

        > tuned system."

        >

        >

        >

        > "The antenna was one mile long, about 800 to 1200 feet up,

        >

        > and was tuned with a massive inductor made of five inch

        >

        > diameter Litz wire."

        >

        >

        >

        > More to drool over, some antenna patching 'panels' used

        >

        > in shore stations,

        >

        >

        >

        > http://www.virhisto ry.com/navy/ xmtrs/tuner/ xmtr-patch- 02.JPG

        >

        > http://www.virhisto ry.com/navy/ xmtrs/tuner/ xmtr-patch- 01.JPG

        >

        >

        >

        > Another engineer writes about his time at Thule,

        >

        >

        >

        > "An interesting transmitter (FRT-4) we used for an

        >

        > unspecified purpose was this huge "walk-in" high powered

        >

        > transmitter (55 kw) built by General Electric. It had a

        >

        > brass rail in front of it and those so incline could stand

        >

        > at the rail and look at the powerful vacuum tubes glowing

        >

        > in the window. For electronics technicians that was the

        >

        > next best thing to TV. The antenna for this transmitter

        >

        > was 50 feet (15 m) taller than the Empire State Building -

        >

        > something over 1240 feet tall. It was the tallest antenna

        >

        > in the world for many years, until larger TV antennas

        >

        > were constructed. High winds across the antenna created

        >

        > so much static electricity that blue arcs were common

        >

        > on the transmission line inside the building and jumping

        >

        > across the antenna insulators outside that were rated at

        >

        > 1 million volts."

        >

        >

        >

        > More from that fellow at http://thulegreenla ndsite.com/

        >

        >

        >

        > It must have been impressive when everything was working fine,

        >

        > must have been *very* impressive when anything went wrong!

        >

        >

        >

        > Thanks Walter for sharing a few memories. You should put

        >

        > them all on a website!

        >

        > --

        >

        > Paul Nicholson

        >

        > --

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        >

        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        >

























        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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