Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Fireball over the Baltic Sea - Final Remarks

Expand Messages
  • drobnock2
    Hi A clarification please about the data collection method. Are the receivers that were used during the Baltic Event tuned to know stations transmitting on a
    Message 1 of 46 , Feb 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi
      A clarification please about the data collection method.

      Are the receivers that were used during the Baltic Event tuned to
      know stations transmitting on a know frequency, or were the
      receivers "broad" tuned receiving a wide range of frequencies? If so
      what is the tuned frequency range during the event? Or are the
      receivers tuned to a frequency that has not know beacon or signal?

      Were filters used? Specific filters to tune at what frequency range?

      I was under the original impression that the signature was received
      on the Yorkshire based receiver (one receiver), how many receivers
      were in operation at the time of the event? And how may were
      recording data? What frequency range was of interest at the time of
      the event?

      What stations were operating within 100 Km of the flight path?

      Sorry for the long inquiry.
      GJD

      --- In VLF_Group@yahoogroups.com, "df3lp" <df3lp@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi All
      >
      > Paul wrote:
      >
      > > ...
      > > That rules out their connection with the fireball.
      > >
      > > I don't propose to do any more work on this recording unless
      > > a good timeline for this fireball becomes available.
      >
      > No news about timetracks or trajectory. Only this: my old 75 kHz
      > receiver does not show any sign from the meteor fall.
      >
      > At 6th of Jan. I lost net contact to the old narrow band 75 kHz
      > receiver and I had no opportunity to look for what happened. We
      talked
      > about the final stop of that honourable receiver. RIP onto a
      natural
      > death after many years of service?
      >
      > Not at all!
      > Last week I went out to that location to see what happened. It was
      a
      > mains fault, running out off UPS. I do not fully understand why,
      but
      > that old 486/66 notebook (yes: 16mb RAM, Linux, kernel 2.0/2.2)
      > restarted registration when UPS had been reloaded after 34 hours.
      >
      > Unfortunately it could not restart the net service (PCMCIA) and
      > therefore no NTP was available. To my surprise the kernel-pll could
      > track the time error down to -2.3 sec over 3 weeks! It was a simple
      > task to check this since the time stamps are visible *inside* the
      raw
      > data.
      >
      > Collecting now all available data from here (4 receivers inside a
      > radius of 100-150 km from "ground zero") I can confirm that *this*
      > fireball, with steep impact and a huge final explosion below 20km
      of
      > height did not emit any significant LF/VLF signal and did not
      > significantly alter the ionosphere.
      >
      > Peter,
      > 54N 10E
      >
    • Paul
      ... Todmorden was the only one recording broad band audio. Others were using SID monitors which either record the level of some specific military signals, or
      Message 46 of 46 , Feb 5, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        GJD wrote:

        > A clarification please about the data collection method.

        > Are the receivers that were used during the Baltic Event
        > tuned to know stations transmitting on a know frequency,
        > or were the receivers "broad"

        Todmorden was the only one recording broad band audio. Others
        were using SID monitors which either record the level of some
        specific military signals, or record a power spectrum at frequent
        intervals.

        Nobody has picked up anything that can be attributed to the
        fireball. Perhaps we'll have better luck next time - by then
        hopefully a few more receivers will be recording full time.

        --
        Paul Nicholson
        --
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.