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Fw: Another ProMed article worth reading

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  • Pamela Alley
    ... From: Pamela Alley To: Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2003 12:21 AM Subject: Another ProMed article worth reading ...
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 12, 2003
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      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Pamela Alley <RNRQ@...>
      To: <VHDInfo@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2003 12:21 AM
      Subject: Another ProMed article worth reading


      > This was a very interesting email; I strongly recommend that ALL rabbit
      > owners (and cavy people, come to that) be very alert to any signs of
      > monkeypox in their animals or in themselves. Please note that a rabbit
      has
      > been infected; that means that we MUST be responsible owners and report
      any
      > such occurrences in our animals.
      >
      > Pamela Alley, RVT
      > Director, Rabbit Industry Council
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: <promed@...>
      > To: <promed-ahead@...>
      > Sent: Wednesday, June 11, 2003 7:04 PM
      > Subject: PRO/AH> International animal movement: veterinary control
      >
      >
      > >
      > > INTERNATIONAL ANIMAL MOVEMENT: VETERINARY CONTROL
      > > ************************************
      > > A ProMED-mail post
      > > <http://www.promedmail.org>
      > > ProMED-mail, a program of the
      > > International Society for Infectious Diseases
      > > <http://www.isid.org>
      > >
      > > [1]
      > > Date:10 Jun 2003
      > > From: William J. Barnes Agency <wjb@...>
      > > Source: Canada.com [edited]
      > >
      >
      <http://www.canada.com/news/story.asp?id=DD513474-93D2-462F-9449-80C49F8ACA9
      > 6>
      > >
      > > The monkeypox outbreak illustrates a growing problem: Exotic animals
      give
      > > exotic diseases to people who get too close, a trend that some medical
      > > specialists call a serious public health threat. Such diseases can
      become
      > a
      > > threat not just to the people who buy and sell exotic pets, but to the
      > > general public if the diseases spread to native animals and become
      > > established in the United States. Federal health officials are working
      > > frantically to ensure that doesn't happen with monkeypox.
      > >
      > > "This is a harbinger of things to come," warns Michael Osterholm of the
      > > University of Minnesota, who advises the government on infectious
      diseases
      > > -- and has long warned that there's too little oversight of the health
      > > threats of imported animals.
      > >
      > > "There are some of us who feel like lone voices in the night" in calling
      > > for better scrutiny, adds Peter Jahrling, a scientist at the U.S. Army
      > > Medical Research Institute [of Infectious Diseases] (USAMRIID). "Perhaps
      > > incidents like this might bring some much-needed re-examinations."
      > >
      > > Monkeypox, a relative of smallpox usually found in tropical African
      > > forests, apparently jumped from an imported Gambian giant rat into
      prairie
      > > dogs when both species were being housed by an exotic pet distributor in
      > > Illinois.
      > >
      > > Health officials are investigating nearly 3 dozen possible cases of
      > > monkeypox in people who bought or cared for the prairie dogs in
      Wisconsin,
      > > Indiana, and Illinois. The outbreak marks the first time monkeypox has
      > been
      > > detected in the Western Hemisphere. Nor is it the only threat, say
      critics
      > > who fear a growing trend.
      > >
      > > SARS, the respiratory epidemic, is thought to have come from civet cats
      > > bred as an exotic meat in Chinese markets where bats, snakes, badgers,
      and
      > > other animals live in side-by-side cages until they become someone's
      > dinner.
      > >
      > > Japan recently banned the importation of prairie dogs because they can
      > > carry plague. The rodents had been wildly popular as pets in that
      country.
      > >
      > > Just last summer, a group of prairie dogs caught in South Dakota was
      > > discovered to have tularemia, a dangerous infection typically spread by
      > the
      > > bites of infected ticks, deerflies, and such or through ingesting
      > > contaminated material. The disease was detected only after the animals
      > were
      > > shipped to 10 other states and 5 other countries. While the Centers for
      > > Disease Control and Prevention never recorded any human illness, adults
      > who
      > > handled the ill rodents were advised to take precautionary antibiotics.
      > >
      > > Then there's salmonella, which iguanas and other reptiles, as well as
      > > birds, routinely shed in their feces. The CDC counts a stunning 90 000
      > > people a year believed to have caught salmonella from some form of
      contact
      > > with a reptile, either touching it or touching a surface where the
      reptile
      > > had tracked the bacteria.
      > >
      > > It is a common scenario, Osterholm says: Parents wash the reptile cage
      in
      > a
      > > bathtub or sink their child uses, and the child gets sick. Salmonella
      can
      > > be life-threatening in children. Worse is if a disease jumps from exotic
      > > pets into native wildlife -- a threat whenever owners dump an animal
      that
      > > gets too large or tiresome to care for.
      > >
      > > The CDC's Dr. Steve Ostroff made a plea Monday for prairie-dog owners
      not
      > > to release their animals into the wild, but to call a veterinarian or
      > their
      > > state health department for proper care information. Call ahead before
      > > taking a sick prairie dog to a veterinary clinic to guard against
      possible
      > > exposure of other animals to monkeypox, he said. A sick prairie dog has
      > > already infected a rabbit who lived in the same house; Jahrling worries
      > > that hamsters and gerbils could be incubating monkeypox from pet-store
      > > transmission; in Africa, squirrels carry the virus.
      > >
      > > "Even if we do manage to bring the prairie dog problem under control,
      > it's
      > > very important that we keep our guard up" by watching for monkeypox in
      > > other species, Ostroff said Monday. There are no good counts of how many
      > > exotic animals are sold, but they're immensely popular, says Richard
      > > Farinato, director of the Humane Society of America's captive wildlife
      > > program. Some 800 000 iguanas alone are imported for the pet trade.
      > >
      > > There is little federal scrutiny of most imported animals for potential
      > > human health risk, and rules on owning and selling exotic animals vary
      by
      > > state and city.
      > >
      > > "We have a policy that says don't buy these kinds of animals as pets.
      This
      > > (monkeypox) is one example of why," Farinato says. But even the critics
      > > aren't immune to the lure of exotic pets. Osterholm several years ago
      let
      > > his teenage son buy an African dwarf hedgehog, another pet fad -- with
      the
      > > condition that it be tested for disease. Osterholm's laboratory found
      the
      > > animal harboured 3 strains of salmonella never before seen in Minnesota.
      > >
      > > They kept the hedgehog, but "extreme hand washing took place," Osterholm
      > > recalls. "It wasn't that fun."
      > >
      > > ******
      > > [2]
      > > Date:10 Jun 2003
      > > From: William J. Barnes Agency <wjb@...>
      > >
      > > I believe the article above implicitly supports the inspection of export
      > > animals at departure airports from Europe into the USA.
      > >
      > > My hope is that the anomaly of allowing the absence of veterinary
      > inspections
      > > at European departure airports will be addressed at the Second
      > International
      > > Conference on the Transportation of Horses, which will be held at
      Hartpury
      > > College, Gloucestershire, England on 12-13 Jul 2003. Currently, this
      > serious
      > > omission could allow import into the USA of sick horses and/or horses
      not
      > fit
      > > to ship in a humane manner. In addition, the welfare of contact horses
      is
      > > compromised; after all, the USA importers' most important asset is the
      > horse.
      > >
      > > Currently, a horse can be imported into the USA with a health
      certificate
      > > written 30 days ago. This is not acceptable. I have asked that this
      topic
      > > be addressed at the upcoming US Animal Health meeting. It is on the
      > > Import/Export committee agenda, and I am requesting support for airport
      > > inspection.
      > >
      > > --
      > > William J. Barnes Agency, Inc.
      > > 220 Golf Edge
      > > Westfield, NJ 07090-1806 USA
      > > Phone: 908-232-7650
      > > Fax: 908-789-0706
      > > <wjb@...>
      > >
      > > [Perhaps part of the issue is what should or should not be a pet -- and
      in
      > > what type of environment? Perhaps it also involves the understanding
      that
      > > diseases can pass from people to animals as well as from animals to
      > people;
      > > we should not be so quick to blame every outbreak on animals.
      > Furthermore,
      > > better education regarding personal hygiene and sanitation is called
      for,
      > > as pointed out in the article. Frequent hand washing and general
      > sanitation
      > > of the area is important for decreasing the risk of disease
      transmission.
      > >
      > > Regarding horses, the ultimate question is: How long is too long? Is 30
      > days
      > > reasonable to secure the appropriate and necessary paperwork, testing,
      and
      > > vaccines and handle any difficulties in the transport of the animal(s)?
      > Is
      > > it possibly a case of simply needing to inspect and verify the health of
      > the
      > > animal(s) immediately prior to departure, since all vaccines, testing,
      > etc,
      > > should already have been completed? There is no easy answer regarding
      > > infectious diseases, time lines, and not tightening the regulations to
      the
      > > point that trade is completely restricted. - Mod.TG]
      > >
      > > [see also:
      > > Monkeypox, human, prairie dogs - USA (WI, IL, IN) 20030608.1412
      > > Monkeypox, human, prairie dogs - USA(WI,IL,IN)(02) 20030609.1422
      > > Monkeypox, human, prairie dogs - USA(WI,IL,IN)(03) 20030610.1433
      > > Monkeypox, human, prairie dogs - USA(WI,IL,IN)(04) 20030611.1436
      > > 2000
      > > ----
      > > Foot & mouth disease - Russia: airport control 20000907.1531
      > > Foot & mouth disease, control measures - Japan 20000425.0621
      > > Foot & mouth disease, control methods? - South Korea 20000420.0577
      > > Heartwater control, interim action - USA 20000327.0442
      > > 1997
      > > ----
      > > Psittacosis (Chlamydiosis) Control, CDC Compendium 1997 19970718.1503
      > > .............................tg/pg/jw
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