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Re: "Never Stall" really works!

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  • spangle543
    Thank you for the tip, Jeffrey. I just placed my online order for a tube of Never Stall and can t wait to see the improvement on my layout. Best wishes,
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 5, 2011
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      Thank you for the tip, Jeffrey. I just placed my online order for a tube of "Never Stall" and can't wait to see the improvement on my layout.

      Best wishes,
      Eileen
    • jmac_han
      Hello Eileen, One further observation...it only takes a very little amount of Never Stall liquid on wipers and turnout point contacts. It is easy to apply too
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 5, 2011
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        Hello Eileen,

        One further observation...it only takes a very little amount of Never Stall liquid on wipers and turnout point contacts. It is easy to apply too much using the applicator. I suggest that you put a small drop on a piece of glass or ceramic, like a plate or saucer, then use the tip of a toothpick to grab a small amount and then touch it to the contact points. The stuff transfers easily to the rails if you put it on the wheel treads.

        For wheels, I would use a ear swab to wipe some Never Stall on to a short length of track and run your locomotives over the area to pick up some of the liquid. You should notice an improvement after running the loco around the layout a couple of times.

        In any case, trial and error is my guide. I suggest that you err on the side of "too little" liquid than "too much", just to avoid having to wipe down the track.

        Happy railroading!

        Jeffrey
      • spangle543
        Thank you again, Jeffrey. I ll heed your advice and be careful about the amount I apply. Eileen
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 5, 2011
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          Thank you again, Jeffrey. I'll heed your advice and be careful about the amount I apply.

          Eileen
        • bob
          Any feelings for how well this might work on a garden railroad? Probably not very well, since you would need a lot more of it and it would probably get washed
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 6, 2011
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            Any feelings for how well this might work on a garden railroad? Probably not very well, since you would need a lot more of it and it would probably get washed off in the rain.
            Bob
          • Don
            This is a quote from Dave George, aka Mr Dave, of the Golden~Blackhawk: Same stuff. I did not use in engines. I only touched some on one of the balky
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 6, 2011
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              This is a quote from Dave George, aka Mr Dave, of the Golden~Blackhawk:

              "Same stuff. I did not use in engines. I only touched some on one of the balky turnouts. I could not see much difference."

              He purchased a tube at Sacramento 2011 NMRA and as I read this string I asked if if it was the same material.

              ...don
            • jmac_han
              Hi Bob, The literature that comes with the tube says that it works to remove and prevent oxidation at electrical contact points. That is how I used the stuff,
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 6, 2011
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                Hi Bob,

                The literature that comes with the tube says that it works to remove and prevent oxidation at electrical contact points. That is how I used the stuff, wherever there were phosphor-bronze wipers on locos and on turnout swivel joints. On different loco models the wipers are in different positions, i.e. back of the wheels, wheel flanges.

                My objective was not to remove oxidation from the track. This came as a by-product of my inadvertent over application of the stuff to the Liliput loco. I had to wipe down the rails several times to prevent wheel slip on a tight curve. You should have seen the black oil that I collected!

                So, my suggestion is that this stuff would work well in large scale on motor brush contacts and wheel wipers, and turnout point contacts. I expect a conductive grease would work well on G track joints. You would have to experiment. I haven't laid any track yet so I can't give first hand observations.

                Cheers,

                --- In VECRR@yahoogroups.com, "bob" <robert.scherzer@...> wrote:
                >
                > Any feelings for how well this might work on a garden railroad? Probably not very well, since you would need a lot more of it and it would probably get washed off in the rain.
                > Bob
                >
              • jmac_han
                Hi Don, It s hard to say if the turnout had a mechanical problem or oxidation at its electrical contacts. All I can attest to is that the 0-6-0 locos in my
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 6, 2011
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                  Hi Don,

                  It's hard to say if the turnout had a mechanical problem or oxidation at its electrical contacts.

                  All I can attest to is that the 0-6-0 locos in my roster, including the Roco unit that I lubed last night, all work better than I have ever seen. The Roco 0-6-0 only has 4 wheels in contact with the track, just like the Marklin 0-6-0 steamer. I added wipers to the center wheel set but that did not make much of a difference going over Peco dead frog turnouts.

                  Things improved when I applied the silver conductive paint to the frog flangeways but the stalling was not completely cured.

                  After applying Never Stall to the wheel flanges of the Roco 0-6-0 and running it for about 2 feet, it began to run more smoothly and I could drop the speed to a nice prototypical crawl with no hesitation going over two of my most demanding Peco turnouts.

                  Previously, the Roco stalled almost constantly on these turnouts unless I cranked up the speed. Note: I am using an older Lenz decoder so there is no virtual electronic flywheel effect. If the loco loses electrical contact, it loses the DCC signal and stops then restarts. Not very satisfying for the operator.

                  So far, I have been running the three loco types to see if the effect wears off but so far the engines start smoothly and continue to run perfectly.

                  Say hello to Mister Dave for me.

                  Cheers,
                  Jeffrey

                  --- In VECRR@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <zbarr474@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > This is a quote from Dave George,
                  >
                  > "Same stuff. I did not use in engines. I only touched some on one of the balky turnouts. I could not see much difference."

                  > ...don
                • bob
                  Thanks Jeffrey, I think I ll get a tube and give it a try. Bob
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 7, 2011
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                    Thanks Jeffrey, I think I'll get a tube and give it a try.
                    Bob
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