Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Pompeji, was Re: [Unity_Games] SR: Lobster Trap III

Expand Messages
  • AndAgainMA@aol.com
    In response to Matthew s comments on our game of Pompeji at Lobstershack (or Lovetrap, or whatever the weekend is called)... It is indeed a card-laying game.
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 3, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      In response to Matthew's comments on our game of Pompeji at Lobstershack (or
      Lovetrap, or whatever the weekend is called)...

      It is indeed a card-laying game. (I hope to try soon the other card-laying
      game that arrived in the same Adam Spielt order: Knizia's Lord of the Rings
      cardgame, complete with cheesy movie stills.)

      Matthew is rather generous when he reports that I had "a pretty
      good grasp of the rules." The truth is even more amazing: Adlung provide
      clear rules in English for this game! There is Adlung-ese, but of the mild
      variety (e.g., "If a player places a building... in a road, which already
      exists once in this road, he receives points").

      I agree with him that it is a brain-burner - each turn is a puzzle. The two
      of us gave each puzzle some, but not excessive, thought. I think that Pompeji
      would play reasonably well with 3 and maybe with 4, provided everyone was
      willing and able to play at a reasonable pace.

      For me, the biggest problem with the game is that it requires that you are
      able to distinguish between 7 different background colors on the card. This
      wasn't always easy for me in the good light of the LT venue. It would be very
      tough in worse light, or for someone who usually has trouble distinguishing
      colors.

      If you can cope with the color problem, and the head-scratching nature of
      this card-laying game, I'd recommend Pompeji.

      Andrew.

      ps my final point of disagreement with Matt: he, not I, was the "complete and
      utter bastard," stealing my spaces all over the place.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Richard Spoonts
      ... As a matter of fact, several people enjoyed themselves enormously a couple of SNOBs ago while watching me try to sort these cards by color. (For those who
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 3, 2001
      • 0 Attachment
        --- AndAgainMA@... wrote:
        > For me, the biggest problem with the game is that it
        > requires that you are
        > able to distinguish between 7 different background
        > colors on the card. This
        > wasn't always easy for me in the good light of the
        > LT venue. It would be very
        > tough in worse light, or for someone who usually has
        > trouble distinguishing
        > colors.

        As a matter of fact, several people enjoyed themselves
        enormously a couple of SNOBs ago while watching me try
        to sort these cards by color. (For those who don't
        know, I have difficulty with shades of colors,
        particularly those with a brownish tint.) Too bad,
        really, because I thought the game sounded pretty
        cool.

        Richard


        __________________________________________________
        Do You Yahoo!?
        Buy the perfect holiday gifts at Yahoo! Shopping.
        http://shopping.yahoo.com
      • Pitt Crandlemire
        ... With all due respect to Matthhew and Andrew, I ll weigh in with a differing point of view. Pompeji is pure and simple a puzzle game. In order to play it
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 4, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          At 08:55 PM 12/3/01 EST, AndAgainMA@... wrote:
          >
          >If you can cope with the color problem, and the head-scratching nature of
          >this card-laying game, I'd recommend Pompeji.

          With all due respect to Matthhew and Andrew, I'll weigh in with a differing
          point of view. Pompeji is pure and simple a puzzle game. In order to play
          it optimally, you need to analyze the entire board each turn in an effort
          to discover the highest scoring play for the cards you hold. The problems
          are a) card play by other players significantly affects your
          potential,scoring, so you have little ability to do your analysis during
          other players' turns and b) as the game progresses, the analysis takes
          longer and longer as more scoring options come into play through a larger
          and more complex card layout.

          The net result? Lots and lots of downtime. It might just be acceptable as
          a 2 player game but it fails miserably (IMO) with any more than that. If
          you like puzzle games, stick to those that solve the downtime by using
          simultaneous play, like Ricochet Robot).

          -Pitt
        • Matthew Horn
          actually, you and I agree on the game. I said that I would never play the game with more than 2 people, but I did enjoy the slow burn effect the game had on my
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 4, 2001
          • 0 Attachment
            actually, you and I agree on the game. I said that I would never play the
            game with more than 2 people, but I did enjoy the slow burn effect the game
            had on my brain with just Andrew and I playing. In a two-player, since the
            board isn't going to change much, you can set up a better move in a future
            turn by anticipating your opponent's move and there isn't much downtime at
            all.

            It's interesting to note that while Andrew and I both used our statue cards
            (wild cards), neither of us used our 2x cards (which in a two player game
            would let you go twice).

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Pitt Crandlemire [mailto:pittc@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, December 04, 2001 9:57 AM
            To: Unity_Games@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: Pompeji, was Re: [Unity_Games] SR: Lobster Trap III


            At 08:55 PM 12/3/01 EST, AndAgainMA@... wrote:
            >
            >If you can cope with the color problem, and the head-scratching nature of
            >this card-laying game, I'd recommend Pompeji.

            With all due respect to Matthhew and Andrew, I'll weigh in with a differing
            point of view. Pompeji is pure and simple a puzzle game. In order to play
            it optimally, you need to analyze the entire board each turn in an effort
            to discover the highest scoring play for the cards you hold. The problems
            are a) card play by other players significantly affects your
            potential,scoring, so you have little ability to do your analysis during
            other players' turns and b) as the game progresses, the analysis takes
            longer and longer as more scoring options come into play through a larger
            and more complex card layout.

            The net result? Lots and lots of downtime. It might just be acceptable as
            a 2 player game but it fails miserably (IMO) with any more than that. If
            you like puzzle games, stick to those that solve the downtime by using
            simultaneous play, like Ricochet Robot).
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.