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Re: [Unity_Games] [SR] Winter Hill Gaming 12/19/04

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  • Doug Orleans
    ... Might be more accurate to say I like some Icehouse games. I don t like just any game because it uses Icehouse pyramids. The only reason I brought them
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 20, 2004
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      chris_roberts_42 writes:
      > I've noticed Doug likes Icehouse games.

      Might be more accurate to say I like some Icehouse games. I don't
      like just any game because it uses Icehouse pyramids. The only reason
      I brought them this time was to test out my entry in the upcoming
      Third Ice Game Design Competition, but I forgot to bring the Aquarius
      deck that it needs. On the other hand, we should play Zendo some time,
      because I know you like deduction/logic games.

      > Marco Polo
      > (Amy, Chris, Doug, Jess)
      > Next up was this Knizia game that Doug brought with him.

      I liked this a lot more than my first playing, which was with 5. I
      think it's better to avoid playing with 5 unless players are
      experienced, and even then it might be too chaotic.

      > Settlers of Catan – Historical Scenario, Troy
      > Chris = 15
      > Amy = 12
      > Doug = 7
      > Jess = 6

      I think I actually had 8 (one ship VP). But I was pretty much doomed
      by the long mid-game drought of 6s. Even the foodstamp variant
      wouldn't have helped because I was still getting one or two brick per
      turn, but my whole strategy was centered around getting lots of wood
      (to build ships and roads and to support Mykene) and it just didn't
      materialize. I'm still a little wary of using a dice deck (although
      it works well in Settlers of Nuremberg), but maybe there's some other
      variant that would have alleviated the vagaries of the dice.

      > Venture
      > This is an old Sid Sackson game that Doug brought. I have to admit
      > any game that's just random numbers coming out that you need to
      > calculate payoff's for different combinations doesn't hold my
      > attention. I'm not a fan of St. Petersburg either.

      Yeah, I didn't remember until about 15 minutes in that you had said
      you didn't like accounting games that reminded you of work. Sorry to
      have foisted this on you. (It was also longer than I remembered, at
      90-100 minutes, although it could probably fit into an hour with
      experienced players.)

      > Total scores after payouts went like this.
      > Chris = 2, 4, 6, 26, 66, 106, 146
      > Amy = 2, 4, 10, 20, 52, 84, 116
      > Jess = 7, 14, 19, 22, 53, 84, 115
      > Doug = 2, 4, 12, 20, 36, 52, 71
      > As you can see we were all pretty even at the fourth payout. Then my
      > score started to jump by 40 each time.

      Yeah, having both profit cards come up together right before the end
      of the game was kind of silly. I wonder if maybe it would be better
      to just use one profit card in the deck, so it's not just rich get
      richer.

      > Doug spend too much time helping others get better scores and
      > lagged behind. Nice guys finish last in big business.

      I think I was feeling guilty about it being the wrong game for the
      group and I didn't want people to dislike the game even more because
      they were not doing well... On the other hand, the corporations I
      needed just kept happening to come up at the wrong time when other
      players who needed them could get them, and near the end I couldn't
      manage to draw any more proxy fight cards to take them over, so I
      think I was just screwed even without helping others. Despite all the
      math and the puzzle-like system for putting conglomerates together,
      it's really kind of a light, random game underneath. (Similar to
      Alhambra, now that I think about it-- they even have some of the same
      mechanisms, e.g. not being able to make change when buying.)

      --dougo@...
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