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I demand a recount....

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  • W. Eric Martin
    ...in last night s game of Reef Encounter. Phil did a great job of summarizing the rules, which are presented in an awkward, near-backwards fashion as I found
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 3, 2004
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      ...in last night's game of Reef Encounter.

      Phil did a great job of summarizing the rules, which are presented in an
      awkward, near-backwards fashion as I found out later upon reading them
      for the first time. The game itself flowed nicely, and I can see the
      depth of the tactics, timing, placement, and so forth coming out in
      future plays. Brian took the win, despite nearly succumbing to fatal
      greed in the final few moves.

      Reading through the rules, though, I found one major rule that we had
      missed and answers to other questions we had. The major rule would
      definitely have affected gameplay because we broke it at least twice and
      possibly three times. Here it is:

      A player can place at most one alga counter on a coral tile per turn.

      Brian locked up two or three on one turn, and I think Phil did two at
      once as well. I failed to lock up a second on one turn, then kicked
      myself as Phil demolished my reef and rolled my shrimp into a small
      appetizer. Locking only one tile a turn would give players more time to
      react and less chance of creating a single dominating coral block.

      The other questions we had:

      Do you get a bonus coral tile if you play next to an open center space
      that was once occupied? Yes, as long as the extra tile won't connect two
      controlled corals of the same color, the extra tile comes onto the board
      automatically.

      Must you play all tiles of one color on the same board? No, polyp tiles
      played as an action don't have to be placed on the same coral or even
      the same rock.

      Overall, Reef Encounter is quite impressive, and I look forward to
      playing it again this weekend and in the months ahead.

      Eric-4


      --
      W. Eric Martin - TwoWriters.net
    • Mark Edwards
      ... ... and so do I, in last night s game of Goldbrau. We played several rules wrong and while that had nothing to do with my dismal last place finish I am
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 3, 2004
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        At 03:08 PM 11/3/2004 -0500, W. Eric Martin wrote:

        >...in last night's game of Reef Encounter.

        ... and so do I, in last night's game of Goldbrau.

        We played several rules wrong and while that had nothing to do with my
        dismal last place finish I am officially applying an asterisk to the results.
        It was James and I's second play of the game, with Dave and Rich as
        newbies. I still find the game intriguing but I hate the blind choosing of
        actions (think Basari). Rich took the win with a simple strategy, buy
        stocks as much as possible. I don't think he chose the expand action once,
        which might indicate a fairly serious problem with the game. Further
        investigation is called for.

        On a side note we started the night with an epic 7-player game of
        Struggle of Empires. Most of us were enjoying ourselves, but we called the
        game after the first war (there are supposed to be three) since Dave and
        Phil were looking green around the gills. It's definitely got a bit of
        Princes of Renaissance feel to it, but there's a lot more involved than
        that. Hopefully I'll get another shot at it this weekend.

        Mark



        If you like board games and live in Eastern MA or the surrounding areas
        check out Unity Games -- www.unitygames.org

        'F' is for the "fire" that burns down the whole town,
        'U' is for "uranium" ... bombs!,
        'N' is for "no survivors"...

        -- Plankton
      • Adam Smiles
        ... Buying stocks as much as possible only works if you get them cheaply. Like it s cousin Basari, one of the keys to Goldbrau is being where you want to be,
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 3, 2004
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          >From: Mark Edwards <danger-mouse@...>
          >
          > ... and so do I, in last night's game of Goldbrau.
          >
          > We played several rules wrong and while that had nothing to do with my
          >dismal last place finish I am officially applying an asterisk to the
          >results.
          > It was James and I's second play of the game, with Dave and Rich as
          >newbies. I still find the game intriguing but I hate the blind choosing of
          >actions (think Basari). Rich took the win with a simple strategy, buy
          >stocks as much as possible. I don't think he chose the expand action once,
          >which might indicate a fairly serious problem with the game. Further
          >investigation is called for.

          Buying stocks as much as possible only works if you get them cheaply. Like
          it's cousin Basari, one of the keys to Goldbrau is being where you want to
          be, and being there alone. If player A insists on choosing buy stock, and
          none of the other players drive the price up on them, then its their fault
          for allowing player A to get so many cheap stocks. A will easily run away
          with the game. If you make that player pay 5 or 8 everytime they purchase,
          they'll either run out of money (which means no more stock purchases) or
          they'll pass their action, losing ground to other players who get to do
          stuff on their turn. Enough turns of paying through the nose or doing
          nothing, and they'll start choosing other stuff.

          I'm curious what rules you got wrong, as I got one wrong my first time as
          well. (I missed the rule about a boss not being able to change more than
          once per turn.).

          On the whole its a solid game, which I hope to play more of in the future.

          -Adam
        • Mark Edwards
          ... Not necessarily since when several other players choose the buy stock action they too must pay the higher amount. So relative to the other buyers you
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 3, 2004
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            At 04:33 PM 11/3/2004 -0500, Adam Smiles wrote:

            >Buying stocks as much as possible only works if you get them cheaply...

            Not necessarily since when several other players choose the buy stock
            action they too must pay the higher amount. So relative to the other
            buyers you haven't lost ground (and obviously you've gained a stock). If
            you chose the action and forego buying the stock you don't spend any money,
            then again you don't gain any stock either.

            >I'm curious what rules you got wrong, as I got one wrong my first time as
            >well. (I missed the rule about a boss not being able to change more than
            >once per turn.).

            We were moving the waitress and bum incorrectly. They were beaming all
            over the place. James also found that something amiss with the Boss
            challenges.

            >On the whole its a solid game, which I hope to play more of in the future.

            I'm still on the fence. On the one hand I find the simple economic
            system pretty neat and elegant, but the action selection, luck in the
            stock purchasing and initial deal, plus the relative value of the actions
            concerns me. It's definitely got me intrigued enough to try it a few more
            times.

            Mark


            If you like board games and live in Eastern MA or the surrounding areas
            check out Unity Games -- www.unitygames.org

            'F' is for the "fire" that burns down the whole town,
            'U' is for "uranium" ... bombs!,
            'N' is for "no survivors"...

            -- Plankton
          • James Torr
            ... time as ... than ... I ve played twice, and both times we played correctly according to the English rules. Then I looked on BGG and found out there is 1
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 4, 2004
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              > I'm curious what rules you got wrong, as I got one wrong my first
              time as
              > well. (I missed the rule about a boss not being able to change more
              than
              > once per turn.).

              I've played twice, and both times we played correctly according to
              the English rules. Then I looked on BGG and found out there is 1
              mistranslation in the rules, and some ambigity over the designer's
              intent about shares. The things we got "wrong" are:

              1. The drunken bum and pretty waitress can only move 0, 1, or 2
              spaces clockwise (skipping over the other token if it's there), not
              in either direction as the rules state. This was a mis-translation in
              the English rules.

              2. For challenging to become boss, the rules say you must have at
              least one share in the business being challenged, but the designer
              (Franz-Benno Delonge) says that what he meant by that was that you
              must have at least one share on the board *or in your hand*
              (a "hidden" share). In addition, the English rules say you can only
              lay down a share card when you buy it, in the course of a boss
              challenge, or right before Payday. But the designer posted on
              BGG: "You can show our hidden share at any time you want. Even if it
              is not your turn. Because you do already own the share. And it is
              your completely free decision, how long you want to use the
              additional advantage to keep this fact secret." This way would make
              the rules a little simpler so I'm going to go with it.
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