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Re: [Unity_Games] SR: GSG 6/3 - Duel of Ages, Democrazy, Amun-Re

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  • Ian Schreiber
    ... This same concern was raised on Venatic s web forums. There are a number of responses: * This is more of an issue if you only play with the first set;
    Message 1 of 2 , Jun 4, 2003
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      >There was an awful lot of dice rolling....
      >
      >While I did enjoy the game, and I would play it again, I was a bit
      >disappointed by the labyrinth mechanism, which really is the central way
      >the game winner is determined.

      This same concern was raised on Venatic's web forums. There are a number of
      responses:
      * This is more of an issue if you only play with the first set; additional
      expansions (particularly Set 2) add a number of extra mechanics that reduce
      the focus on labyrinths. (One could argue this is just a feeble attempt to
      make more sales; on the other hand, the entire game as originally designed
      would have cost far too much to sell as a single unit, which is why they
      broke it up into seven of them.) At any rate, it's clear that Set 1 is
      deliberately set up to be fairly simple and easy to learn, at the expense of
      deeper strategy.
      * Varying the number of characters per team and the number of platters (the
      big map tiles) makes a huge difference. You played with 8-character teams,
      presumably using all four platters; some would recommend only using three of
      the four in that case, which would put everyone in a smaller space and shift
      some emphasis to combat.
      * The designers assert that each die roll in the game is of roughly equal
      importance, and that a team might make 80 or 100 die rolls over the course
      of the game; therefore, while there is a lot of die-rolling, there's enough
      of it to override the luck-factor for the most part (that is, with so many
      die rolls, neither team is probably going to roll all that much better than
      the other team overall, so the main determiner of outcome will be superior
      tactics).

      >Now if you had a list of choices of things to do in the
      >labyrinth, and you could weigh the advantages and
      >disadvantages of each one, it might be more interesting.

      You DO have a list of choices, actually:
      1) Send 'em in to the labyrinth and try to roll well against the guardian.
      2) Send 'em in to the Tower. Each labyrinth has one, and you can get there
      at least one turn earlier than the guardian. Towers don't advance your
      victory point count, but they do give you varying degrees of tactical
      advantages.
      3) Blockade! You're not allowed to move through an enemy-occupied hex, so
      leaving one character on guard duty at a labyrinth your team is currently
      winning can delay the opposing team from even trying to advance for 7+
      turns.

      It isn't readily apparent when to take advantage of the last two options
      until you've played a few times, unfortunately, but I can vouch for their
      usefulness firsthand.
    • Mark J. Edwards
      ... Do they add any additional means of gaining VPs? ... As I mentioned we played pretty haphazardly, not really attempting any defense, but I can see where
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 4, 2003
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        At 10:13 PM 6/4/2003 -0400, Ian Schreiber wrote:
        >* This is more of an issue if you only play with the first set; additional
        >expansions (particularly Set 2) add a number of extra mechanics that reduce
        >the focus on labyrinths.

        Do they add any additional means of gaining VPs?

        >You DO have a list of choices, actually:
        >3) Blockade! You're not allowed to move through an enemy-occupied hex, so
        >leaving one character on guard duty at a labyrinth your team is currently
        >winning can delay the opposing team from even trying to advance for 7+
        >turns.

        As I mentioned we played pretty haphazardly, not really attempting any
        defense, but I can see where this could become very important. The more I
        think about it the more I think DoA belongs in the "war game" category or
        at least in the Wiz War/beer&pretzel war game category. The game outside
        of combat with the other team seems fairly limited (the encounters/towers
        aren't exactly involving). Or am I missing something.

        Speaking of Wiz War, I went to check on Brian's "Strange Synergy" after
        Frank Branham mentioned it on the NigglyBits list. It's due in
        July! Check it out at: http://www.sjgames.com/strangesynergy/

        Mark


        "Just look at him. Square. The shape of *EVIL*" - Plankton
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