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Re: [Unity_Games] Removing That Musty Smell From Game Boxes

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  • Dan Blum
    ... Well, if there is dirt on the games (very common if they smell) you should clean them before trying to de-scent them. You can try using just a moist paper
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
      >
      > Sort of on-topic... went a yard-saleing this past weekend (good finds! Two
      > Password editions that I was missing were 50 cents each and a couple of
      > scrabble sets (not sure if they are complete, didn't care) for 25 cents each
      > so I can take the wooden racks and use them for tile-drawing games like
      > Acquire). Got a couple of older games that have a bit of a musty smell to
      > them (you know the kind...). Any tips as to how to remove the musty smell
      > easily. I don't want to spray the components - lots of cardboard and paper
      > stuff in the boxes which might be damaged. I've heard baking powder but not
      > sure if that's good or just messy. Any tips?

      Well, if there is dirt on the games (very common if they smell) you should
      clean them before trying to de-scent them. You can try using just a moist
      paper towel but I usually end up using Fantastik or something like that
      (test it on a corner to make sure it isn't going to take off the ink, and
      only use it on coated stock).

      Once you've done that, get some clumping cat litter (preferably unscented)
      and a large box, and put the game components in the box such that each one is
      totally surrounded by litter. Then leave them there for a month or two.
      There are certain materials this won't work on but usually it's pretty
      effective.


      --
      _______________________________________________________________________
      Dan Blum tool@...
      "I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
    • Joe Kidd
      ... Once you ve started that, I recommend not letting the cat near the box for that month. /J
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
        Dan Blum wrote:
        > Once you've done that, get some clumping cat litter (preferably unscented)
        > and a large box, and put the game components in the box such that each one is
        > totally surrounded by litter. Then leave them there for a month or two.
        > There are certain materials this won't work on but usually it's pretty
        > effective.

        Once you've started that, I recommend not letting the cat near the box
        for that month.

        /J
      • Dave Bernazzani
        ... I just happen to have a newly acquired cat that has adopted Jenn and I (the best and cutest cat in the world, I might add... though rather shy of new
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
          Dan wrote:

          > Once you've done that, get some clumping cat litter
          > (preferably unscented) and a large box, and put the
          > game components in the box such that each one is
          > totally surrounded by litter. Then leave them there
          > for a month or two. There are certain materials this
          > won't work on but usually it's pretty effective.

          I just happen to have a newly acquired cat that has adopted Jenn and I (the
          best and cutest cat in the world, I might add... though rather shy of new
          people) and have plenty of clumping unscented cat litter to try this
          suggestion. One of the games cost me a dime so if it doesn't work, not much
          would be lost anyway. I'll give it a try, thanks!

          --
          Dave Bernazzani
          daveber@... (remove NOSPAM to use)
          http://www.unitygames.org (Unity Games - Eastern MA Gaming)
        • Kornfeld, Lewis A
          I once found was asked to temporarily store a box of games is my car which was a hatch back at the time. It was July and the games were ripe with the odor of
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
            I once found was asked to temporarily store a box of games is my car which
            was a hatch back at the time. It was July and the games were ripe with the
            odor of mildew. It was a hot July and I kept the windows closed when I was
            not driving the car, and the box was in direct sun light for much of the
            day. The odor started dissipating until it was completely gone in a week or
            two. Since then I have been advised by a chemical engineer that the
            ultraviolet rays of the sun is a very good disinfectant. Try putting the
            games out in direct sunlight on a hot day. Or you can even lock them in the
            car during the summer. There is no chemicals involved and no kitty litter.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Dave Bernazzani [mailto:daveber@...]
            Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2003 1:26 PM
            To: Unity Games
            Subject: [Unity_Games] Removing That Musty Smell From Game Boxes


            Sort of on-topic... went a yard-saleing this past weekend (good finds! Two
            Password editions that I was missing were 50 cents each and a couple of
            scrabble sets (not sure if they are complete, didn't care) for 25 cents each
            so I can take the wooden racks and use them for tile-drawing games like
            Acquire). Got a couple of older games that have a bit of a musty smell to
            them (you know the kind...). Any tips as to how to remove the musty smell
            easily. I don't want to spray the components - lots of cardboard and paper
            stuff in the boxes which might be damaged. I've heard baking powder but not
            sure if that's good or just messy. Any tips?

            --
            Dave Bernazzani
            daveber@... (remove NOSPAM to use)
            http://www.unitygames.org (Unity Games - Eastern MA Gaming)



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          • Dan Blum
            Sure, but the UV will also fade the games... not a big deal for the average yard-sale find, but I ve used the kitty litter technique on $200 games I certainly
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
              Sure, but the UV will also fade the games... not a big deal for the average
              yard-sale find, but I've used the kitty litter technique on $200 games I
              certainly wouldn't put in the sunlight.

              I think it's also questionable whether this will work on the INSIDE of a
              game, unless you open it up and spread all the bits out.

              >
              > I once found was asked to temporarily store a box of games is my car which
              > was a hatch back at the time. It was July and the games were ripe with the
              > odor of mildew. It was a hot July and I kept the windows closed when I was
              > not driving the car, and the box was in direct sun light for much of the
              > day. The odor started dissipating until it was completely gone in a week or
              > two. Since then I have been advised by a chemical engineer that the
              > ultraviolet rays of the sun is a very good disinfectant. Try putting the
              > games out in direct sunlight on a hot day. Or you can even lock them in the
              > car during the summer. There is no chemicals involved and no kitty litter.
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: Dave Bernazzani [mailto:daveber@...]
              > Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2003 1:26 PM
              > To: Unity Games
              > Subject: [Unity_Games] Removing That Musty Smell From Game Boxes
              >
              >
              > Sort of on-topic... went a yard-saleing this past weekend (good finds! Two
              > Password editions that I was missing were 50 cents each and a couple of
              > scrabble sets (not sure if they are complete, didn't care) for 25 cents each
              > so I can take the wooden racks and use them for tile-drawing games like
              > Acquire). Got a couple of older games that have a bit of a musty smell to
              > them (you know the kind...). Any tips as to how to remove the musty smell
              > easily. I don't want to spray the components - lots of cardboard and paper
              > stuff in the boxes which might be damaged. I've heard baking powder but not
              > sure if that's good or just messy. Any tips?
              >
              > --
              > Dave Bernazzani
              > daveber@... (remove NOSPAM to use)
              > http://www.unitygames.org (Unity Games - Eastern MA Gaming)
              >
              >
              >
              > Unity Games webpage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Unity_Games
              > To unsubscribe send email to Unity_Games-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >
              > Unity Games webpage: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Unity_Games
              > To unsubscribe send email to Unity_Games-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              >
              >
              >


              --
              _______________________________________________________________________
              Dan Blum tool@...
              "I wouldn't have believed it myself if I hadn't just made it up."
            • Eric Shultz
              I can t find the link, but I once read an online guide about must and mold in books. They also recommended sunshine and fresh air. They also recommended
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
                I can't find the link, but I once read an online guide
                about must and mold in books. They also recommended
                sunshine and fresh air. They also recommended
                vacuuming to get the loose bits of mold out. I tried
                it with some yard sale games and it helped, but did
                not solve the problem.

                I believe it said if there was visible mold, you would
                probably need to use some form of chemical to clean
                it.

                Eric

                --- "Kornfeld, Lewis A"
                <Lewis.A.Kornfeld@...> wrote:
                > I once found was asked to temporarily store a box of
                > games is my car which
                > was a hatch back at the time. It was July and the
                > games were ripe with the
                > odor of mildew. It was a hot July and I kept the
                > windows closed when I was
                > not driving the car, and the box was in direct sun
                > light for much of the
                > day. The odor started dissipating until it was
                > completely gone in a week or
                > two. Since then I have been advised by a chemical
                > engineer that the
                > ultraviolet rays of the sun is a very good
                > disinfectant. Try putting the
                > games out in direct sunlight on a hot day. Or you
                > can even lock them in the
                > car during the summer. There is no chemicals
                > involved and no kitty litter.
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Dave Bernazzani [mailto:daveber@...]
                > Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2003 1:26 PM
                > To: Unity Games
                > Subject: [Unity_Games] Removing That Musty Smell
                > From Game Boxes
                >
                >
                > Sort of on-topic... went a yard-saleing this past
                > weekend (good finds! Two
                > Password editions that I was missing were 50 cents
                > each and a couple of
                > scrabble sets (not sure if they are complete, didn't
                > care) for 25 cents each
                > so I can take the wooden racks and use them for
                > tile-drawing games like
                > Acquire). Got a couple of older games that have a
                > bit of a musty smell to
                > them (you know the kind...). Any tips as to how to
                > remove the musty smell
                > easily. I don't want to spray the components - lots
                > of cardboard and paper
                > stuff in the boxes which might be damaged. I've
                > heard baking powder but not
                > sure if that's good or just messy. Any tips?
                >
                > --
                > Dave Bernazzani
                > daveber@... (remove NOSPAM to use)
                > http://www.unitygames.org (Unity Games - Eastern MA
                > Gaming)
                >
                >
                >
                > Unity Games webpage:
                > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Unity_Games
                > To unsubscribe send email to
                > Unity_Games-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                >
                >


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              • Dave Bernazzani
                ... The main thing I d be afraid of is heat damage (warping) or fading of the components from exposure to the sun (the components are pretty old and somewhat
                Message 7 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
                  Lewis wrote:

                  >There is no chemicals involved and no kitty litter.

                  The main thing I'd be afraid of is heat damage (warping) or fading of the
                  components from exposure to the sun (the components are pretty old and
                  somewhat faded to begin with).

                  --
                  Dave Bernazzani
                  daveber@... (remove NOSPAM to use)
                  http://www.unitygames.org (Unity Games - Eastern MA Gaming)
                • Matthew Horn
                  ... The odd thing is, most of these techniques can be applied to your average gamer, too. Haven t tried the clumping kitty litter on Campbell, but will do so
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
                    > They also recommended sunshine and fresh air. They also recommended
                    > vacuuming to get the loose bits of mold out.

                    The odd thing is, most of these techniques can be applied to your average gamer, too. Haven't tried the clumping kitty litter on Campbell, but will do so soon.

                    matt
                  • Dawn Townsend
                    Any tips as to how to remove the musty smell ... In the pet aisle of the supermarket they sell these charcoal filter things which are inside a plastic clip.
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
                      Any tips as to how to remove the musty smell
                      >easily. I don't want to spray the components - lots of cardboard and paper
                      >stuff in the boxes which might be damaged. I've heard baking powder but
                      >not
                      >sure if that's good or just messy. Any tips?
                      >

                      In the pet aisle of the supermarket they sell these charcoal filter things
                      which are inside a plastic clip. They are supposed to be used around cat
                      boxes- I use them, they work great! Maybe that would work?

                      Dawn

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                    • Brian Stormont
                      ... Hmmm... I wonder if this cleaning technique would have worked for the game of Freedom in the Galaxy a friend of mine had left set up in his basement. We
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jun 4, 2003
                        At 01:29 PM 6/4/2003 -0400, Dan Blum wrote:

                        >Once you've done that, get some clumping cat litter (preferably unscented)
                        >and a large box, and put the game components in the box such that each one is
                        >totally surrounded by litter. Then leave them there for a month or two.
                        >There are certain materials this won't work on but usually it's pretty
                        >effective.

                        Hmmm... I wonder if this cleaning technique would have worked for the game
                        of "Freedom in the Galaxy" a friend of mine had left set up in his
                        basement. We had interrupted play and left it to play on the following
                        weekend. Unfortunately, he made the mistake of stashing the unused
                        cardboard counters in the box top and his cat decided to use it as a litter
                        box. Ug!

                        Brian
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