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SR: Dragon Delta, Lumberjack, Fabrik der Traume, Star Wars Epic , Duels, Frag, Deadlands

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  • Vitas Povilaitis
    May 16, 2002 Danger Planet gaming session. 5-player Dragon Delta, 5-player Fabrik der Traume, 5-player Lumberjack, 6-player Star Wars Epic Duels,
    Message 1 of 7 , May 17, 2002
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      May 16, 2002

      Danger Planet gaming session. 5-player Dragon Delta, 5-player Fabrik
      der Traume, 5-player Lumberjack, 6-player Star Wars Epic Duels,
      3-player Frag: Deadlands.

      Dragon Delta.
      Players were Cindy, Karl, Adam, Shawn, and myself. We all played for
      the first time.

      This game is played on a board with villages separated by a body of
      water containing small islands. Players have a limited selection of
      actions to choose from (printed on cards.) The actions are: lay down a
      stone, lay down two stones, lay down a plank, lay down two planks,
      remove a stone or a plank, move pawn once, move pawn twice, hop pawn
      over another pawn, prevent a player's move. Players choose five cards
      and lay them face-down in front of them in the order they want to play
      them. Then, one card at a time, players flip over their card, and play
      their move in order starting with the first player then proceeding
      clockwise. After all cards are played, the player to the left of the
      first player becomes the new first player. The goal of the game is to
      cross the water by laying stones on islands and laying planks on the
      stones to get to the village on the opposite side.

      This game played fairly quickly. The strategy is straight-forward
      except for he chaos that I had to contend with as all the other
      players who intentionally or inadvertently foiled my attempts to get
      across. I was frustrated because I didn't get off my village the first
      turn which was a strategic error on my part, and people just .made
      better progress. I was trying to be clever, thinking I could do
      something different than everyone else and ramp off their efforts, but
      that's not effective the first turn because I needed a stone and ramp
      off my village to get going and no one would do that for me. We were
      focused on preventing Adam from getting one move to his destination.
      Karl snuck by us and won after 35 minutes of play.

      Lumberjack.
      Players were Cindy, Karl, Adam, Shawn, and myself. Adam played this
      before.

      This is a game played with small colored, stunted logs. The logs are
      randomly stacked as a tower with a hexagonal circumference. Each
      player then removes a log and places it in front of himself.

      We played the pyramid variant, in which each player builds a triangle
      in front of himself, with a base length of five. The goal is to get as
      many logs with the same color touching. Scoring is double the number
      of blocks with the same color touching, then adding those scores
      together.

      The game lasted 15 minutes, and is a light filler.
      * Adam: 101
      * Cindy: 89
      * Vitas: 89
      * Shawn: 71
      * Karl: 53

      Fabrik der Traume.
      Players were Cindy, Karl, Adam, Shawn, and myself.

      In this game, players try to score points by making movies. Players go
      through many bidding phases to get valuable directors, actors,
      cinematographer., special effects, and agents. Payment for them go to
      a pot that is divided up by the players who didn't get them. Points
      are scored for completing movies.

      I like trying new games, so this was interesting. Bidding games,
      though, are not very compelling, so I can't say I like this. It would
      make a good filler if it lasted one round, instead of four rounds.
      * Adam: 82
      * Vitas: 65
      * Cindy: 64
      * Shawn: 49
      * Karl: 34

      Star Wars Epic Duels.
      Players were Cindy (as Anakin Skywalker and Princess Amadala), Karl
      (as Boba Fett and Greedo), Adam (as Han Solo and Chewbacca), Nancy (as
      Count Dooku and droids), Shawn (as the Emperor and guards), and myself
      (as Luke Sywalker and Princess Leia.) We all played for the first
      time.

      We played as three players on the side of good, and three players on
      the side of evil. Princess Leia started off by destroying the
      Emperor's guards, leaving herself open as a target for the forces of
      evil. She was eliminated next by the Emperor's forceful attacks. Luke
      went around to attack Count Dooku, and became the next target. When
      Luke went down, I was eliminated from the game, so I went off to play
      a game of Frag.

      When I checked in, it looked like a stand-off between the Emperor and
      Chewbacca and Anakin. At about two hours of play, evil finally won.

      I found the pacing of the game fun. The game had surprises in the form
      of power combat cards and special cards, but not in the sense that
      anyone can get overwhelmed before the game ended. Surprises came in
      short spurts, with a lot of maneuvering and skirmishes along the way.

      Frag, Deadlands.
      Players were Jason (playing Black Duster), (the other) Adam (playing
      Mad Scientist), and myself (playing Saloon Gal.)

      In this game, players go around on a map board grid representing an
      Old West town picking up gadgets and weapons, and shooting other
      players. gadgets are good for offense and defense.

      After an hour, Adam won.

      It feels like this expansion weighed down a good game with things that
      drag out the game. It was fun pulling surprises that increased damage
      unexpectedly, but frustrating to have a lot of damage foiled. Plus,
      there are cards that unbalance the game so that it becomes obvious who
      has and will keep the upper hand.

      Also, with the map being as big as it was, we needed more players for
      the game to be engaging. A smaller board would've been more fun.

      Vitas Povilaitis
      http://www.GracefulBoot.com/board_games
    • Karl von Laudermann
      ... Allow me to elaborate. I generally don t play bidding games, because I suck at them, and always come in last. (I didn t realize that this was a bidding
      Message 2 of 7 , May 17, 2002
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        On Friday, May 17, 2002, at 05:23 PM, Vitas Povilaitis wrote:

        >    Fabrik der Traume.
        >    Players were Cindy, Karl, Adam, Shawn, and myself.
        >
        >    In this game, players try to score points by making movies. Players go
        >    through  many  bidding  phases  to  get  valuable  directors,  actors,
        >    cinematographer.,  special effects, and agents. Payment for them go to
        >    a  pot  that  is divided up by the players who didn't get them. Points
        >    are scored for completing movies.
        >
        >    I  like  trying  new  games,  so  this was interesting. Bidding games,
        >    though,  are not very compelling, so I can't say I like this. It would
        >    make a good filler if it lasted one round, instead of four rounds.
        >      * Adam: 82
        >      * Vitas: 65
        >      * Cindy: 64
        >      * Shawn: 49
        >      * Karl: 34
        >     

        Allow me to elaborate. I generally don't play bidding games, because I
        suck at them, and always come in last. (I didn't realize that this was a
        bidding game until everybody had already agreed to play and the rules
        explanation was starting.)

        So I played this game, sucking horribly through most of it. Late in the
        game however, it seemed like I was in danger of not coming in last: during
        the fourth phase (or "year" or whatever) I actually got an actor (two in
        fact), and completed a film. Not only did I actually complete a film, but
        it was the worst one on the table, thus putting me in danger of getting
        the extra 10 points for Worst Film. However, I got lucky and managed to
        pull a last-place defeat after all, ending the game with one 9 point film
        plus 25 contracts.

        I think I'll play this again sometime, and try to get a better score by
        having no completed films, and 40-50 contracts. It seems that a
        straightforward strategy of never bidding will ensure success in this goal.

        --
        Karl J. von Laudermann
        karlvonl@...
        http://www.geocities.com/~karlvonl/
        Richard's PBeM Server ID: karlvonl
      • Vitas Povilaitis
        May 23, 2002 Danger Planet open gaming. 4-player Dragon s Gold, 5-player Web of Power, 4-player Star Wars Epic Duels, 3-player Diceland, 4-player
        Message 3 of 7 , May 24, 2002
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          May 23, 2002

          Danger Planet open gaming. 4-player Dragon's Gold, 5-player Web of
          Power, 4-player Star Wars Epic Duels, 3-player Diceland, 4-player
          Carcassonne.

          Dragon's Gold.
          Players were Cindy, Rich, Vitas and Adam/Ralph. We were all new
          players.

          In Dragon's Gold, each player has three characters: Two knights with a
          strength of 4 and 3, a thief with a strength of 2, and a wizard with a
          strength of 1. There are four dragons revealed. Each with a toughness
          between five through eleven, and various amount of colored treasure
          known and hidden. Each turn, a player adds a character to fight a
          dragon until there is enough characters with a strength total matching
          or exceeding the dragon's toughness. At that point, the dragon is
          defeated, the hidden treasure revealed and the treasure is divided
          among the players participating in that battle. There is a minute time
          limit to divide the treasure, else all the treasure is forfeited.
          Additionally, a single wizard will automatically get all the red
          treasure, a thief will steal a random treasure from a character
          participating in the battle, and a wizard & thief combination will
          steal a specific treasure from a participating character. Certain
          colored treasure are worth points, and other colors are worth points
          only to the player who collected the most of that color.

          The game ends when the last available treasure is collected. (The
          rules say the game ends when all the dragons are slain after all the
          treasure has been placedr. However, we ended up with two dragons with
          hidden treasure in the end, and since there were no treasure left to
          fulfill the hidden treasure for those dragons. We decided it'd be
          silly to continue to attack the dragons to fulfill that part of the
          game rules.) The player with the most points wins.

          Also, there are advanced rules that add spells to the game, and change
          the way treasure scores.

          This game seemed to flow fairly quickly and was fun for it. The
          artwork is very engaging and suitable, which made the game more
          pleasing. Division of treasure was extremely civil, which may owe to
          the fact that everyone was new to the game and (except for Cindy)
          didn't grasp the weight of collecting specific colors. I grabbed the
          only black treasure early in the game before players realized it was
          worth a lot of points, but it didn't help against Cindy who collected
          the most colored treasures of nearly all the colors. I thought I had
          an impressive stash while I was playing though :-)

          The game lasted about an hour.

          * Cindy: 71
          * Adam/Ralph: 41
          * Rich: 36
          * Vitas: 33

          Web of Power.
          Players were Tim, Ralph, Rich, Cindy and myself. Tim didn't play
          before.

          Tim thought this game went surprisingly fast. I think this is the
          general reaction for the game which seems like it should be longer for
          its complexity. I didn't do well with the cards I drew because I
          didn't get matching pairs nor the chance to use many wild cards, so I
          ended up placing one token per turn when I needed to place two. Also,
          I tried to place advisors instead of monastaries early in the game,
          which was a disadvantage for the first round of scoring.

          Tim was able to make an impressively long chain of monastaries.

          The game lasted about an hour and 25 minutes.

          * Tim: 61
          * Cindy: 57
          * Rich: 50
          * Ralph: 34
          * Vitas: 33

          Star Wars Epic Duels.
          Players were Rich (playing Anakin Skywalker and Padme Amadala), (the
          other) Adam (playing Boba Fett and Greedo), Cindy (playing Han Solo
          and Chewbacca) and myself (playing Jengo Fett and Zam Wessel.) Rich
          and Adam were new to the game.

          Zam was the first casualty at Amadala's. Chewbacca's bowcaster was
          especially impressive at finishing off Greedo. Jengo kept after
          Chewbacca because I was afraid of Chewie's bowcaster. Boba kept after
          Anakin in order to finish off a main character. In the end, the forces
          of evil collapsed, and good suffered no fatalities.

          The game lasted about 25 minutes.

          Diceland, by Cheapass Games.
          Players were Rich, Cindy, and myself. Rich and Cindy were new players.

          This time, we played the rules properly, and fired weapons after
          throwing dice. This led to more dice being thrown during the game.
          Rich had to leave early. I ended up dropping all my dice on the floor
          which ended the game early. Game lasted about a half-hour.
          * Cindy: 35
          * Vitas: 25
          * Rich: 8

          Carcassonne with river expansion
          and the new expansion.
          players were Ralph, Demitri, Tim, and myself. We all played various
          versions of the game before.

          Ralph and Tim were counting on a supercity that was bulding up.
          Demitri and I kept foiling the city by placing the cathedral and hard
          city pieces there. I put my bets on farms, but the fields ended up not
          favoring me. Ralph seemed to be placing his meeples in all the right
          places.

          Interesting that this English edition had 50 point tiles (100 pts
          printed on the back) to help keep score on the undersized scoreboard.
          This is unlike the German edition which has a bigger (up to 70 points
          instead of 50) board which is still undersized.

          The game ended after about an hour.

          * Ralph: 101
          * Demitri: 85
          * Vitas: 62
          * Tim: 59

          Vitas Povilaitis
          http://www.GracefulBoot.com/board_games
        • Vitas Povilaitis
          May 30, 2002 Open gaming at Danger Planet. 4-player Siesta, 3-player Big Cheese, 4-player Diceland, 3-player Agora. Siesta. There were two games of
          Message 4 of 7 , May 31, 2002
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            May 30, 2002

            Open gaming at Danger Planet. 4-player Siesta, 3-player Big Cheese,
            4-player Diceland, 3-player Agora.

            Siesta.
            There were two games of Siesta. Players for the first game were Tom,
            Cindy, Karl, and myself. Tom and Cindy played for the first time.
            Players for the second game were Cindy, Nancy, Karl, and myself.

            The first game was pretty close. The familiar diagonal of suns
            surrounding rooftops and shadows developed. Tom decided to break out
            of this pattern and defy strategy by placing his pieces outside this
            corridor at one point. He paid the price for his creativity. :-) Game
            lasted about 18 minutes.
            * Vitas: 32
            * Cindy: 29
            * Karl: 28
            * Tom: 26

            The second game, somehow Karl placed some clever moves and kept the
            lead. Cindy had to leave just before Karl decided to end the game
            while he was ahead.
            * Karl: 41
            * Nancy: 34
            * Cindy: 31
            * Vitas: 26

            The Big Cheese.
            Players were Cindy, Karl and myself. We were all new players.

            In this game, we start with twenty flunkies (tokens.) We bid them on
            projects that come up (in the form of cards.) If a player outbids the
            other players, the player gets the project and puts all the flunkies
            he bid onto it. Then all players remove a flunky off their projects
            (except for the one that was just won.) When the last flunky is
            removed off a project, the player rolls the die indicated on the
            project, and adds that number to his score. First player to score 40
            points wins. There are also Big Cheese cards which lets a player
            re-roll, and Veto cards which remove a project from bidding.

            This game was very engaging, though it seemed longer than it should
            have been at 25 minutes for its low level of mental activity. Because
            of the randomness of the die rolls, strategy was low -- try harder to
            get high-rolling projects, and let the low-rolling projects go unless
            you don't have any projects going. Then again, I think Cindy was
            actively calculating the cost-benefit of each project.
            * Cindy: 45
            * Vitas: 30
            * Karl: 12

            Diceland.
            Players were Karl and Nancy on one team, and Cindy and myself on the
            other team. Nancy and Karl played for the first time.

            I thought this would be a simple team effort with players alternating
            turns. However, people on each team had intense discussions about what
            the best move would be each turn before taking it. I found this aspect
            entertaining. Each team took one side of the table to throw from. Even
            though Cindy and I lost two dice from play, we ended up winning in
            just under an hour. This was because we had nice world effects or
            abilities going most of the time: confuse and protection.
            * Cindy and Vitas: 56
            * Karl and Nancy: 40

            Agora.
            Players were Nancy, Karl and myself. We all played before.

            This felt like it was off to a bad start for me because on my first
            turn, being the last person to play, I drew a festival which gave
            everyone an extra income before I even got started! I had hope soon
            after as a fire threatened to burn down shops Karl and Nancy were in,
            but there was a tie for biggest shop so no fire developed. Later in
            the game, though, a fire burned down shops that Karl and Nancy were
            occupying, which evened the playing field at last. In the end, a final
            festival pushed Nancy's score to the win.

            After about 40 minutes, the score was:
            * Nancy: 68
            * Vitas: 43
            * Karl: 40
          • Vitas Povilaitis
            May 24, 2002 Private session. 3-player Cranium Kid s Cadoo. Cranium Kid s Cadoo. I played this with my dear friend and her nine year-old daughter. I gave this
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 3, 2002
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              May 24, 2002
              Private session. 3-player Cranium Kid's Cadoo.

              Cranium Kid's Cadoo.
              I played this with my dear friend and her nine year-old daughter. I gave
              this game to her as a Christmas gift, and she pulls it out
              enthusiastically for us to play. I like it because it fosters creativity.
              In this game, a player rolls a die to determine what kind of card to play.
              There are solo cards which contain puzzles, and miniature scavenger hunts.
              There are combo cards which contain challenges of charades, drawing
              pictures and sculpting. Scoring is done on a 4x4 board, but that's mainly
              to let players know when to stop, because all the fun is in the actual
              playing of the game. The game lastest 30 minutes.

              May 25, 2002
              Danger Planet open gaming. 2-player Star Wars The Queen's Gambit, 5-player
              Frag.

              Star Wars The Queen's Gambit.
              Players were Karl (playing the Federation forces) and myself (playing the
              Naboo forces.) Karl played for the first time.

              This seemed like the quickest game I've played of The Queen's Gambit, even
              though it was a two and a half hour session (including time to go over the
              rules.)

              Anakin cleared one space, so he wasn't close to the droid control ship at
              all. The planetside battle was close to over with an overwhelming
              Federation victory. The Federation forces wiped out the majority of the
              Naboo forces in the palace, even before Darth Maul emerged from his battle
              with the Jedi.

              In the end Karl won.

              Frag.
              Players were Jason, (another) Jason, Karl, Chris and myself.

              I had to leave early after a half-hour of play. By that time, Jason got
              one frag.

              Still seems like there's too much downtown for what happens.

              Perhaps a decent variant would be to exchange gunfire until one player
              passes, which means the encounter is broken off. Also, players have to
              pick up ammo for their weapons, instead of the weapons coming fully
              loaded. Ammo tokens could be picked up instead of gadgets. For a fast
              game, any ammo could be used in any weapon. For a more thoughtful game, a
              deck of ammo specific for weapons can be used. Ammo is drawn from a
              face-up deck. There would be enough ammo to fill every ammo space of every
              weapon in play -- no more, no less. Ammo tokens/cards load the appropriate
              weapon automatically, but count against a ammo hand-size limit if
              unloaded. (You might not want to load a weapon automatically, to keep your
              weapons a surprise until used.)

              June 1, 2002
              Danger Planet open gaming. 5-player Chez Dork, 5-player Drakon, 3-player
              Formula De.

              Chez Dork.
              Players were Karl (playing Matt), Chris (playing Igor), Adam (playing
              Ken), Nancy (playing Carson), and myself (playing Bill.)

              Adam started off with a bang playing two cards that gave him extra cash.
              Then he bided his time, silently playing stuff until he won. In the
              meantime, we all picked on each other not really noticing Adam's
              potential. I just had bad draws -- not enough stuff.

              Adam: 25
              Nancy: 20
              Chris: 14
              Karl: 13
              Vitas: 11
              Drakon.
              Players were Karl, Chris, Adam, Nancy, and myself. Karl played before.

              I was looking forward to playing this game because I like the idea of a
              dungeon exploration board game. In this game, a player has a hand of five
              tiles and has a character on a starting tile. During his turn, the player
              either places a tile adjacent to an existing tile, making sure that arrows
              don't point toward each other, or moves his character. Some tiles have a
              special ability printed on them.

              I was disappointed that there's a strategy that shortcuts the fun of the
              game. By placing a room with a key next to a room with a gold pointing
              toward the key room, a player can just go back and forth to quickly get
              the five gold needed to win. (A teleporter room works as well as a key
              room. In our case, Karl and Nancy picked up on this and the rest of us had
              to work together to keep them from benefiting from that arrangement, but
              we didn't have a decent setup to effectively foil both of them, and
              prevent Chris from getting to the teleporter which would get him his fifth
              gold. Game lasted about 50 minutes.

              Chris: 5
              Karl: 4
              Nancy: 4
              Vitas: 4
              Adam: 1
              Formula De.
              Players were Karl, Nancy, and myself. Karl played before.

              We played a basic two lap race on the Nederland Zandvoort track, which has
              a nice straight-way and easy turns.

              Basically, a player chooses a valid gear, and rolls the appropriate dice
              (not numbered normally, but with an appropriate range of numbers for the
              given gear) and moves that number of spaces on the track. The track is
              huge. Then, taking turns, players must stop the appropriate number of
              times on them, or bad things happen.

              Nancy started conservatively, and paid the price, never catching up to
              Karl and me. I pulled out ahead in sixth gear at one point, and felt
              confident I'd win, but I had to slow down for a couple turns or risk
              blowing out. Karl, didn't have to shift down to take the turns and ended
              up with good rolls, which meant he sped past me for the win.

              Karl: 1st place
              Vitas: 2nd place
              Nancy: third place
              June 2, 2002
              Private session. 2-player Red Dwarf The Card Game.

              Red Dwarf The Card Game. Players were Nancy and myself. We both played for
              the first time.

              I found this game on the Net. Being Red Dwarf fans, Nancy and I decided to
              try it. I printed the cards to regular paper, and cut them out. I used
              Ultra-Pro Deck Protectors to hold the cards. This proved awkward to
              shuffle because it didn't have the right stiffness. Also, the cards print
              small, so it took up a small portion of space in the deck protector
              sleeve. I may tray laminating the cards instead to see if that gives me
              better results.

              Basically, players draw from a face-down deck of tasks, travel cards, and
              re-cyc cards, or from a common face-up area of episode cards and a Holly
              card. Then players play a card. Re-cyc cards are played anytime and
              replaced immediately, so players always have seven cards (or eight at the
              star of their turns) in hand. Players give characters tasks to perform.
              Players then play travel cards to execute a task and score the points on
              the task. There are additional cards that either benefit the player or
              hinder the opponent.

              The game itself is simple but engaging. I thought the game would be a
              straightforward screw-the-opponent game, but the deck is large enough that
              a player may not have the right cards at the right time. Part of the fun
              is seeing the screenshots from the show and recalling the episode.

              After an hour of play (including going over the rules) I won.

              Vitas: 12
              Nancy: 7

              As an aside, I was working on a 3-D, glowing Ice house Volcano board.
              While I was waiting for the paint to dry, I tried out the Magic: the
              Gathering Online game. Magic: the Gathering is my favorite card game, but
              I fell out of it when I moved from Rochester in '97 and lost contact with
              my gaming group. It's in beta test right now, and will go live on June 24.
              But for the beta, players can pretend to buy decks and boosters (these
              virtual cards will cost real money when the game goes live) and play games
              of Magic with people from all around the country and the world. The
              computer makes sure the rules are strictly adhered to, and makes sure only
              the cards owned by the player are played.

              I'm not going to keep track of these sessions, because of its addictive
              nature. I tend to play game after game just trying different tactics and
              decks. The fun here is that I can find other skillful players at any time,
              which makes this the best online game I've ever played.


              Vitas Povilaitis
              http://www.GracefulBoot.com/board_games
            • Karl von Laudermann
              ... Huh? Guns are fully loaded when you pick them up. There are gadget cards that allow you to reload guns, but you only need to use them if you ve already
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 3, 2002
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                On Monday, June 3, 2002, at 06:15 PM, Vitas Povilaitis wrote:

                > Perhaps a decent variant would be to exchange gunfire until one player
                > passes, which means the encounter is broken off. Also, players have to
                > pick up ammo for their weapons, instead of the weapons coming fully
                > loaded. Ammo tokens could be picked up instead of gadgets.

                Huh? Guns are fully loaded when you pick them up. There are gadget cards
                that allow you to reload guns, but you only need to use them if you've
                already used up the ammo in your gun.

                > I found this game on the Net. Being Red Dwarf fans, Nancy and I decided to
                > try it. I printed the cards to regular paper, and cut them out. I used
                > Ultra-Pro Deck Protectors to hold the cards. This proved awkward to
                > shuffle because it didn't have the right stiffness. Also, the cards print
                > small, so it took up a small portion of space in the deck protector
                > sleeve. I may tray laminating the cards instead to see if that gives me
                > better results.

                The approach I would take is to print the cards onto full sheet sticker
                paper (Avery 8255), stick it onto cardboard or thick paper, and then cut
                them out. This is probably less work than laminating, and would make them
                more rigid.

                --
                Karl J. von Laudermann
                karlvonl@...
                http://www.geocities.com/~karlvonl/
                Richard's PBeM Server ID: karlvonl
              • Eric Shultz
                Do you have a link to get this on the net? I suppose I could search, but I m very lazy. As for printing cards. Wal-Mart sells card stock cheap. I think it s
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 4, 2002
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                  Do you have a link to get this on the net? I suppose
                  I could search, but I'm very lazy.

                  As for printing cards. Wal-Mart sells card stock
                  cheap. I think it's $5 for a package about the size
                  of a ream of paper (although I'm not sure if it's
                  actually 500 sheets).

                  I think cards made from it would be thick enough to
                  shuffle, and last a bit better than paper. Maybe I'll
                  try a few sheets. and see.

                  Eric Shultz

                  --- Vitas Povilaitis <vitas@...> wrote:
                  > Red Dwarf The Card Game. Players were Nancy and
                  > myself. We both played for
                  > the first time.
                  >
                  > I found this game on the Net. Being Red Dwarf fans,
                  > Nancy and I decided to
                  > try it. I printed the cards to regular paper, and
                  > cut them out. I used
                  > Ultra-Pro Deck Protectors to hold the cards. This
                  > proved awkward to
                  > shuffle because it didn't have the right stiffness.
                  > Also, the cards print
                  > small, so it took up a small portion of space in the
                  > deck protector
                  > sleeve. I may tray laminating the cards instead to
                  > see if that gives me
                  > better results.
                  >
                  > Basically, players draw from a face-down deck of
                  > tasks,
                  === message truncated ===


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