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Top Secret Spies

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  • Vitas Povilaitis
    Constantine, Here s my opinion of Top Secret Spies, after playing a 7-player game... I don t know if Top Secret Spies can be fun. In it, you move spies around
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2002
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      Constantine, Here's my opinion of Top Secret Spies, after playing a
      7-player game...

      I don't know if Top Secret Spies can be fun. In it, you move spies
      around the board scoring points, but no one knows which spies belong
      to which of the other players. There are three levels of the game.
      First is as simple as I just described. Second adds cards to mess with
      positions of spies. Third adds scoring based on guesses of who's
      playing which spies (but we didn't get to that level... the second
      level of the game dragged out the length of the game to the point that
      it was no fun and we halved the scoring requirement to end it sooner.)
      As I can see it, if you move your own spy to advantage, you'll get a
      high score and people will know it's you. Otherwise, you'd be
      advancing someone else to keep them from guessing who you are, and
      you'll get the lower score. Knowing who's who never really matters
      during the game because everyone will try to knock down whoever is
      ahead. I think this game would be more fun for kids.

      I think the reason it made FunAgain's top seller list is because it was
      highly discounted for their January overstock sale.

      -Vitas P.-
    • AlanRMoon@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/1/02 3:23:25 PM Eastern Standard Time, vitas@gracefulboot.com writes:
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2002
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        In a message dated 2/1/02 3:23:25 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        vitas@... writes:

        << Constantine, Here's my opinion of Top Secret Spies, after playing a
        7-player game...

        I don't know if Top Secret Spies can be fun. In it, you move spies
        around the board scoring points, but no one knows which spies belong
        to which of the other players. There are three levels of the game.
        First is as simple as I just described. Second adds cards to mess with
        positions of spies. Third adds scoring based on guesses of who's
        playing which spies (but we didn't get to that level... the second
        level of the game dragged out the length of the game to the point that
        it was no fun and we halved the scoring requirement to end it sooner.)
        As I can see it, if you move your own spy to advantage, you'll get a
        high score and people will know it's you. Otherwise, you'd be
        advancing someone else to keep them from guessing who you are, and
        you'll get the lower score. Knowing who's who never really matters
        during the game because everyone will try to knock down whoever is
        ahead. I think this game would be more fun for kids.

        I think the reason it made FunAgain's top seller list is because it was
        highly discounted for their January overstock sale.

        >>The original version of the game was called HEIMLICH & CO. It was released
        by Franck-Kosmos in 1984. That version was nominated for Spiel Des Jahres in
        1985. In 1986 Ravensburger released a new edition. That game won Spiel Des
        Jahres in 1986. Yes, that means this game was basically in the running for
        SdJ in two different years! Anyone want to guess how many other games have
        this distinction?

        HEIMLICH & CO. was proven winner in the family game market for many years for
        Ravensburger. The latest edition by Amigo hasn't changed much, but Amigo
        obviously thinks they can sell enough of perennial winners like this (and
        another SdJ winner CAFE INTERNATIONAL for another example) to make it worth
        their while. I hope they are right.

        Alan
      • Matthew Horn
        ... Zero?
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 1, 2002
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          >>That game won Spiel Des Jahres in 1986. Yes, that means this game was basically in the running for
          >>SdJ in two different years! Anyone want to guess how many other games have this distinction?

          Zero?
        • AlanRMoon@aol.com
          In a message dated 2/1/02 3:44:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, mhorn@macromedia.com writes:
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 1, 2002
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            In a message dated 2/1/02 3:44:17 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            mhorn@... writes:

            << That game won Spiel Des Jahres in 1986. Yes, that means this game was
            basically in the running for SdJ in two different years! Anyone want to guess
            how many other games have this distinction?

            Zero?

            >>Wrong-oh Statistic Breath. There were three other games that were nominated
            one year and later won. One of these games didn't win until three years
            later. There were also at least two games that were nominated in two separate
            years but didn't win, one of which is an American game still being played
            regularly (if not often) by most gamers who like Designer Games.

            Alan
          • Matthew Horn
            ... Oh yeah! You must be talking about Fishy! ... Let s hope San Marco and Capitol get this kind of future consideration . -m
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 1, 2002
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              >>one of which is an American game still being played...by most gamers who like Designer Games.

              Oh yeah! You must be talking about Fishy!

              :)

              >>There were three other games that were nominated one year and later won.

              Let's hope San Marco and Capitol get this kind of "future consideration".

              -m
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