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Frank again....Re: Frank....Re: [UniQuaria] Chocolate Gourami

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  • harry perry
    An update.....I lost one out of the 4 and it looked like a second one was almost gone. Then I read your post. I took my best heater and set it at 80. The weak
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 2, 2012
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      An update.....I lost one out of the 4 and it looked like a second one was almost gone. Then I read your post. I took my best heater and set it at 80. The weak one seemed to recover overnight.

      My pH is at 8. I don't like using chemicals and when I researched pH some professional sites suggested to just leave it alone. A sudden change would do more harm then good. I did add some oak leaves to change it gradually.
      Do peat pellets help?

       I'm feeding flake, bloodworms and BBS.

      I suspect that the supplier was not keeping the pH low. How criticle is  this?.

      Over time will this kill my fish?.

      Thanks again for your help.

      Harry


      From: harry perry <harryfisherman@...>
      To: "UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com" <UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, November 30, 2012 8:30 PM
      Subject: Frank....Re: [UniQuaria] Chocolate Gourami

      Thank you very much.

      Harry


      From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...>
      To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, November 30, 2012 7:32 PM
      Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] Chocolate Gourami

       
      On 11/30/2012 12:58 PM, harry perry wrote:
      I just picked up 4 of these. Can any one share any information on raising and breeding?.
      Hi Harry. First and foremost, keep them warm. I've found they do best when kept at least 78 dF. Their aquarium should be provided with some driftwood to provide some shaded areas.  I've used oak leaves as a substrate as it not only provides more hiding places, but acidifies the water as well. Keep lighting dim. pH range of 4.5 to 6.5. Due to their small mouth size, small foods are feeded. I've fed mine flake, chopped frozen bloodworms, live blackworms and grated Repashy gel food.
      As to breeding, his species is a maternal mouthbrooder.

      Frank




    • Frank M. Greco
      ... These fish really don t take cool temps well, IME. It really is important to keep them warm. ... A sudden change may do more harm than good, that is true.
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 3, 2012
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        On 12/2/2012 8:13 PM, harry perry wrote:
        An update.....I lost one out of the 4 and it looked like a second one was almost gone. Then I read your post. I took my best heater and set it at 80. The weak one seemed to recover overnight.
        These fish really don't take cool temps well, IME. It really is important to keep them warm.

        My pH is at 8. I don't like using chemicals and when I researched pH some professional sites suggested to just leave it alone. A sudden change would do more harm then good. I did add some oak leaves to change it gradually.
        A sudden change may do more harm than good, that is true. But given that these are probably wild fish, it's for the best to lower the pH. Dried (brown) oak leaves will do just that. How many leaves did you use, and how large is the tank?
        Do peat pellets help?
        Yes, they too will help. But use one or the other.

         I'm feeding flake, bloodworms and BBS.
        Sounds good.

        I suspect that the supplier was not keeping the pH low. How criticle is  this?. Over time will this kill my fish?.
        It will not kill the fish as they will adapt to the higher pH. But for best results, you'll want to keep the pH akin to what they'd be living in in nature.

        Frank
      • harry perry
        I used 6 large oak leaves, brown, dried taken from a tree, not off the ground.. This is a 10 gallon tank. The fish are about 3/4 . Harry
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 3, 2012
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          I used 6 large oak leaves, brown, dried taken from a tree, not off the ground.. This is a 10 gallon tank. The fish are about 3/4".

          Harry


          From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...>
          To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Monday, December 3, 2012 9:53 AM
          Subject: Re: Frank again....Re: Frank....Re: [UniQuaria] Chocolate Gourami

           
          On 12/2/2012 8:13 PM, harry perry wrote:
          An update.....I lost one out of the 4 and it looked like a second one was almost gone. Then I read your post. I took my best heater and set it at 80. The weak one seemed to recover overnight.
          These fish really don't take cool temps well, IME. It really is important to keep them warm.

          My pH is at 8. I don't like using chemicals and when I researched pH some professional sites suggested to just leave it alone. A sudden change would do more harm then good. I did add some oak leaves to change it gradually.
          A sudden change may do more harm than good, that is true. But given that these are probably wild fish, it's for the best to lower the pH. Dried (brown) oak leaves will do just that. How many leaves did you use, and how large is the tank?
          Do peat pellets help?
          Yes, they too will help. But use one or the other.

           I'm feeding flake, bloodworms and BBS.
          Sounds good.

          I suspect that the supplier was not keeping the pH low. How criticle is  this?. Over time will this kill my fish?.
          It will not kill the fish as they will adapt to the higher pH. But for best results, you'll want to keep the pH akin to what they'd be living in in nature.

          Frank


        • Frank M. Greco
          ... That should be enough to bring the pH down. Any idea as to the hardness of your water? Frank
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 3, 2012
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            On 12/3/2012 10:02 AM, harry perry wrote:
            I used 6 large oak leaves, brown, dried taken from a tree, not off the ground.. This is a 10 gallon tank. The fish are about 3/4".

            Harry
            That should be enough to bring the pH down.
            Any idea as to the hardness of your water?

            Frank
          • harry perry
            No but I know we do have hard water. What s the best way to soften it, naturally?. I did put 1 teaspoon of salt in the filter. I was going to build this
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 3, 2012
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              No but I know we do have hard water. What's the best way to soften it, naturally?.
              I did put 1 teaspoon of salt in the filter. I was going to build this gradually.
              I had read this will help with skin issues.

              Harry


              From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...>
              To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Monday, December 3, 2012 10:10 AM
              Subject: Re: Frank....Re: [UniQuaria] Chocolate Gourami

               
              On 12/3/2012 10:02 AM, harry perry wrote:
              I used 6 large oak leaves, brown, dried taken from a tree, not off the ground.. This is a 10 gallon tank. The fish are about 3/4".

              Harry
              That should be enough to bring the pH down.
              Any idea as to the hardness of your water?

              Frank


            • Frank M. Greco
              ... You can do water changes using reverse osmosis water. This will help lower the amount of minerals in the system, and lower hardness. Bottled RO water is
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 3, 2012
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                On 12/3/2012 10:35 AM, harry perry wrote:
                No but I know we do have hard water. What's the best way to soften it, naturally?.
                You can do water changes using reverse osmosis water. This will help lower the amount of minerals in the system, and lower hardness. Bottled RO water is sometimes available from supermarkets.
                I did put 1 teaspoon of salt in the filter. I was going to build this gradually.I had read this will help with skin issues.
                It's mostly good for nitrite toxicity and ectoparasites, depending upon the concentration of salt in the water. As far as helping with "skin issues", I'm not sure what that means. Can you explain?

                Frank
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