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Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions

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  • Lisa Rambo
    Unlike fish you can add as many plants as you like at once.  Some will do well and some will not.  Find what works in your tank with the lighting and
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 4, 2012
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    • 757 KB
    Unlike fish you can add as many plants as you like at once.  Some will do well and some will not.  Find what works in your tank with the lighting and conditions you have and stick with those. 
    Lighting requirments for live plants are around 2 watts per gallon of water.  Some do just as well with less.  Like java fern.
     
    There is no danger for water values.  Plants will help your water stay cleaner by absorbing some of the harmful waste products and they will out-compete algae if you have enough fo them. Very beneficial for any tank.
     
    Keep in mind that mollies may try to eat some plants.  But again, some plants - like java fern- are not as appealing to them.
     
    The only disadvantage to having live plants is that they will die if they do not like your lighting.  Again it will be trial and error when you first start.Oh, you also have to do maintenance on them when they overgrow and need to be cut back.
     
     
    If you do not have a plant friendly substrate ( like Eco Complete or similair) you might want to consider root tabs or liquid supplements to keep them healthy.  You dont' always need these things, but sometimes you do.  Plants also absorb minerals from fresh water put into the tank when you do water changes. If you plan to use water that is distilled and has had all these minerals removed, then you will need to supplement with something. If you choose to supplement just be sure to follow the dosing guidelines.
     
    Oh, and be careful not to overload your tank with fish!  It is tempting, but the rule is 1 inch of adult fish per gallon.  I have gone  from a 5 gallon to a 75 gallon in my fish adventures so I can have everything I want and it has been worth every challenging/frustrating/rewarding minute!!
     
    I have attached a pic of my 75 gallon planted if you would like to see it.
     
    Good Luck!  Lisa
     
     
    Be who you are and say what you feel,
    because those who mind don't matter
    and those who matter don't mind.
    -Dr. Seuss

    From: nonstopmom888 <ehebens@...>
    To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
    Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 8:46 PM
    Subject: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions

     
    Hi all,

    our new tank (10G) seems to have just finished cycling (thanks to the help of forums and the internet :) and I hope it continues to be stable.
    So now we are starting to get a little more adventurous and are thinking about the final setup.
    I would like to try having live plants instead of the plastic and we would like to add a few more fish.This time I would like to plan ahead instead of being one step behind...

    Could you give me advice of the following? I will check and read up more in the internet too but I would be glad to get as many info as possible.

    Regarding the plants:
    - can I just add the plants immediately all together or only one at a time?
    - is there a danger for the water values?
    - which plants work best for mollies or do I have to take what I can get? Does it matter?
    - any disadvantages having live plants vs. plastic?
    - do they get enough nutrition from the fish alone usually?
    - I do not want to shine too much light into the aquarium and used only one of the two possible light bulb until now, they also heat the water up, so I am limited there. A problem?

    Regarding the fish in community tanks:
    we just added a white molly (we had to exchange it in the beginning for a platy and were waiting to introduce one again into the tank)
    Now we are open to add other species or types if possible.

    Right now we have the following fish:
    3 mollies (a white, an orange and a dalmatian molly)
    1 platy (red/black)
    3 golden white clouds

    - My son loves fish with beautiful tails/color and would love a betta. It does not seem a too good idea so we were wondering about guppies instead? But they seem to like slightly different water conditions (lower ph?) or are they flexible enough to be ok?

    - Also we wanted to add 3 more clouds to make a school...
    are there other school fish that we could add to form a second school or be included in that one? Tetra?

    - what is the limit? What happens if the tank is "crowded" with peaceful fish, can I cope with more water changes and lots of places to hide like plants and caves?

    Thanks a lot for advice,
    Nora



  • nonstopmom888
    Hi Lisa, your tank looks really beautiful! Are all those live plants? We just bought one Anacharis and will see how we do... Do you have a snail problem or are
    Message 2 of 17 , Jan 4, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi Lisa,

      your tank looks really beautiful! Are all those live plants?
      We just bought one Anacharis and will see how we do...
      Do you have a snail problem or are the snails just there and no problem?

      Thanks, Nora

      --- In UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Rambo <canineclara@...> wrote:
      >
      > Unlike fish you can add as many plants as you like at once.  Some will do well and some will not.  Find what works in your tank with the lighting and conditions you have and stick with those. 
      > Lighting requirments for live plants are around 2 watts per gallon of water.  Some do just as well with less.  Like java fern.
      >
      > There is no danger for water values.  Plants will help your water stay cleaner by absorbing some of the harmful waste products and they will out-compete algae if you have enough fo them. Very beneficial for any tank.
      >
      > Keep in mind that mollies may try to eat some plants.  But again, some plants - like java fern- are not as appealing to them.
      >
      > The only disadvantage to having live plants is that they will die if they do not like your lighting.  Again it will be trial and error when you first start.Oh, you also have to do maintenance on them when they overgrow and need to be cut back.
      >
      >
      > If you do not have a plant friendly substrate ( like Eco Complete or similair) you might want to consider root tabs or liquid supplements to keep them healthy.  You dont' always need these things, but sometimes you do.  Plants also absorb minerals from fresh water put into the tank when you do water changes. If you plan to use water that is distilled and has had all these minerals removed, then you will need to supplement with something. If you choose to supplement just be sure to follow the dosing guidelines.
      >
      > Oh, and be careful not to overload your tank with fish!  It is tempting, but the rule is 1 inch of adult fish per gallon.  I have gone  from a 5 gallon to a 75 gallon in my fish adventures so I can have everything I want and it has been worth every challenging/frustrating/rewarding minute!!
      >
      > I have attached a pic of my 75 gallon planted if you would like to see it.
      >
      > Good Luck!  Lisa
      >
      >
      > Be who you are and say what you feel,
      > because those who mind don't matter
      > and those who matter don't mind.
      > -Dr. Seuss
      >
      >
      > ________________________________
      > From: nonstopmom888 <ehebens@...>
      > To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 8:46 PM
      > Subject: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions
      >
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      > Hi all,
      >
      > our new tank (10G) seems to have just finished cycling (thanks to the help of forums and the internet :) and I hope it continues to be stable.
      > So now we are starting to get a little more adventurous and are thinking about the final setup.
      > I would like to try having live plants instead of the plastic and we would like to add a few more fish.This time I would like to plan ahead instead of being one step behind...
      >
      > Could you give me advice of the following? I will check and read up more in the internet too but I would be glad to get as many info as possible.
      >
      > Regarding the plants:
      > - can I just add the plants immediately all together or only one at a time?
      > - is there a danger for the water values?
      > - which plants work best for mollies or do I have to take what I can get? Does it matter?
      > - any disadvantages having live plants vs. plastic?
      > - do they get enough nutrition from the fish alone usually?
      > - I do not want to shine too much light into the aquarium and used only one of the two possible light bulb until now, they also heat the water up, so I am limited there. A problem?
      >
      > Regarding the fish in community tanks:
      > we just added a white molly (we had to exchange it in the beginning for a platy and were waiting to introduce one again into the tank)
      > Now we are open to add other species or types if possible.
      >
      > Right now we have the following fish:
      > 3 mollies (a white, an orange and a dalmatian molly)
      > 1 platy (red/black)
      > 3 golden white clouds
      >
      > - My son loves fish with beautiful tails/color and would love a betta. It does not seem a too good idea so we were wondering about guppies instead? But they seem to like slightly different water conditions (lower ph?) or are they flexible enough to be ok?
      >
      > - Also we wanted to add 3 more clouds to make a school...
      > are there other school fish that we could add to form a second school or be included in that one? Tetra?
      >
      > - what is the limit? What happens if the tank is "crowded" with peaceful fish, can I cope with more water changes and lots of places to hide like plants and caves?
      >
      > Thanks a lot for advice,
      > Nora
      >
    • Frank M. Greco
      Since you are looking to limit lighting, I d suggest low-light plants. These include Java fern, Java moss, Christmas moss, Anubias, and Cryptocorynes, to name
      Message 3 of 17 , Jan 4, 2012
      Since you are looking to limit lighting, I'd suggest low-light plants.
      These include Java fern, Java moss, Christmas moss, Anubias, and
      Cryptocorynes, to name a few of the more popular/readily available
      species. I've done my whole tank with these plants, with a few
      exceptions (pennywort and red lotus). I've attached two pics of my tank
      to give you an idea of what you can do with low-light plants.

      Frank
    • bill 1433
      Great looking tanks Frank but what size are they? What lighting is used? bill in pa
      Message 4 of 17 , Jan 4, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        Great looking tanks Frank but what size
        are they? What lighting is used?

        bill in pa

        --- On Wed, 1/4/12, Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...> wrote:

        > From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...>
        > Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions [2 Attachments]
        > To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Wednesday, January 4, 2012, 8:37 PM
        > Since you are looking to limit lighting, I'd suggest
        > low-light plants.
        > These include Java fern, Java moss, Christmas moss,
        > Anubias, and
        > Cryptocorynes, to name a few of the more popular/readily
        > available
        > species. I've done my whole tank with these plants, with a
        > few
        > exceptions (pennywort and red lotus). I've attached two
        > pics of my tank
        > to give you an idea of what you can do with low-light
        > plants.
        >
        > Frank
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > To visit your group on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniQuaria
        >
        >
        > Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do,
        > send a message to:
        > UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com 
        >             Yahoo! Groups
        > Links
        >
        >
        >     UniQuaria-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
      • Jimmie R Davis
        Another gorgeous tank! Nadine
        Message 5 of 17 , Jan 4, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          Another gorgeous tank!
                             Nadine

          At 05:37 PM 1/4/2012, you wrote:
           
          [Attachment(s) from Frank M. Greco included below]

          Since you are looking to limit lighting, I'd suggest low-light plants.
          These include Java fern, Java moss, Christmas moss, Anubias, and
          Cryptocorynes, to name a few of the more popular/readily available
          species. I've done my whole tank with these plants, with a few
          exceptions (pennywort and red lotus). I've attached two pics of my tank
          to give you an idea of what you can do with low-light plants.

          Frank
        • Frank M. Greco
          ... It s only one tank: a 220 gallon. It s lit by a 12 bulb T5 fluorescent fixture, although I use only half the bulbs most of the time. The aquascape is
          Message 6 of 17 , Jan 5, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            On 1/4/2012 8:43 PM, bill 1433 wrote:
            > Great looking tanks Frank but what size
            > are they? What lighting is used?
            It's only one tank: a 220 gallon. It's lit by a 12 bulb T5 fluorescent
            fixture, although I use only half the bulbs most of the time. The
            aquascape is dominated by Java fern growing on cork tubes and
            half-rounds. There are for species of Cryptocorynes, a red lotus, a
            liverwort, Wisteria and pennywort (the latter two growing at the
            surface in the higher light area). Substrate is black fluorite sand, and
            filtration is via an Ehiem Professionel 3 Filter (450 gph).

            Frank
          • Lisa Rambo
            Yes, all live plants.  Swords, java fern, water sprite crypts, and lotus.   Snail can easily get out of control.  I got a couple Queen loaches and they
            Message 7 of 17 , Jan 5, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Yes, all live plants.  Swords, java fern, water sprite crypts, and lotus.   Snail can easily get out of control.  I got a couple Queen loaches and they keep them under control.  Nice little fish.  Stays small and they are great on the malaysian trumpet snails.
               
              Be who you are and say what you feel,
              because those who mind don't matter
              and those who matter don't mind.
              -Dr. Seuss

              From: nonstopmom888 <ehebens@...>
              To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, January 4, 2012 7:42 PM
              Subject: [UniQuaria] Re: live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions

               
              Hi Lisa,

              your tank looks really beautiful! Are all those live plants?
              We just bought one Anacharis and will see how we do...
              Do you have a snail problem or are the snails just there and no problem?

              Thanks, Nora

              --- In UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com, Lisa Rambo <canineclara@...> wrote:
              >
              > Unlike fish you can add as many plants as you like at once.  Some will do well and some will not.  Find what works in your tank with the lighting and conditions you have and stick with those. 
              > Lighting requirments for live plants are around 2 watts per gallon of water.  Some do just as well with less.  Like java fern.
              >
              > There is no danger for water values.  Plants will help your water stay cleaner by absorbing some of the harmful waste products and they will out-compete algae if you have enough fo them. Very beneficial for any tank.
              >
              > Keep in mind that mollies may try to eat some plants.  But again, some plants - like java fern- are not as appealing to them.
              >
              > The only disadvantage to having live plants is that they will die if they do not like your lighting.  Again it will be trial and error when you first start.Oh, you also have to do maintenance on them when they overgrow and need to be cut back.
              >
              >
              > If you do not have a plant friendly substrate ( like Eco Complete or similair) you might want to consider root tabs or liquid supplements to keep them healthy.  You dont' always need these things, but sometimes you do.  Plants also absorb minerals from fresh water put into the tank when you do water changes. If you plan to use water that is distilled and has had all these minerals removed, then you will need to supplement with something. If you choose to supplement just be sure to follow the dosing guidelines.
              >
              > Oh, and be careful not to overload your tank with fish!  It is tempting, but the rule is 1 inch of adult fish per gallon.  I have gone  from a 5 gallon to a 75 gallon in my fish adventures so I can have everything I want and it has been worth every challenging/frustrating/rewarding minute!!
              >
              > I have attached a pic of my 75 gallon planted if you would like to see it.
              >
              > Good Luck!  Lisa
              >
              >
              > Be who you are and say what you feel,
              > because those who mind don't matter
              > and those who matter don't mind.
              > -Dr. Seuss
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: nonstopmom888 <ehebens@...>
              > To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 8:46 PM
              > Subject: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions
              >
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              > Hi all,
              >
              > our new tank (10G) seems to have just finished cycling (thanks to the help of forums and the internet :) and I hope it continues to be stable.
              > So now we are starting to get a little more adventurous and are thinking about the final setup.
              > I would like to try having live plants instead of the plastic and we would like to add a few more fish.This time I would like to plan ahead instead of being one step behind...
              >
              > Could you give me advice of the following? I will check and read up more in the internet too but I would be glad to get as many info as possible.
              >
              > Regarding the plants:
              > - can I just add the plants immediately all together or only one at a time?
              > - is there a danger for the water values?
              > - which plants work best for mollies or do I have to take what I can get? Does it matter?
              > - any disadvantages having live plants vs. plastic?
              > - do they get enough nutrition from the fish alone usually?
              > - I do not want to shine too much light into the aquarium and used only one of the two possible light bulb until now, they also heat the water up, so I am limited there. A problem?
              >
              > Regarding the fish in community tanks:
              > we just added a white molly (we had to exchange it in the beginning for a platy and were waiting to introduce one again into the tank)
              > Now we are open to add other species or types if possible.
              >
              > Right now we have the following fish:
              > 3 mollies (a white, an orange and a dalmatian molly)
              > 1 platy (red/black)
              > 3 golden white clouds
              >
              > - My son loves fish with beautiful tails/color and would love a betta. It does not seem a too good idea so we were wondering about guppies instead? But they seem to like slightly different water conditions (lower ph?) or are they flexible enough to be ok?
              >
              > - Also we wanted to add 3 more clouds to make a school...
              > are there other school fish that we could add to form a second school or be included in that one? Tetra?
              >
              > - what is the limit? What happens if the tank is "crowded" with peaceful fish, can I cope with more water changes and lots of places to hide like plants and caves?
              >
              > Thanks a lot for advice,
              > Nora
              >



            • bill 1433
              Hi Frank, The reason I asked about your lighting? Not much room in our house for a much bigger tank other than what I have now, which is a standard 29-gallon.
              Message 8 of 17 , Jan 6, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                Hi Frank,

                The reason I asked about your lighting? Not much room in our house for a much bigger tank
                other than what I have now, which is a standard 29-gallon. I would like a 65 at 36 x 18 x 24, which would fit in the space we have available.

                I have zero experience with live plants but have been in the hobby for a long time. Back in the 70’s I was spawning and raising Discus. Being retired now but as with most people, not independently wealthily, my thoughts are about the depth of this tank, at 24”. It has been suggested that I use a “Quad” system with 2-10,000 k tubes and 2-6,500 tubes. As you know these are not cheap.

                Others tell me this is over kill and a single double tube fixture at half the cost, with these tubes will work just fine. Not sure of the depth of your 220 but certainly a tank this size would pose the same type of problems. I really would not like to fail in my “first planted tank” attempt. My needs for plants are very simple as to type, anything green! I’d like your thoughts or suggestions on this sets-up.

                Thanks again for the return,

                bill in pa


                --- On Thu, 1/5/12, Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...> wrote:

                > From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@...>
                > Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions
                > To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012, 10:21 PM
                > On 1/4/2012 8:43 PM, bill 1433
                > wrote:
                > > Great looking tanks Frank but what size
                > > are they?  What lighting is used?
                > It's only one tank: a 220 gallon. It's lit by a 12 bulb T5
                > fluorescent
                > fixture, although I use only half the bulbs most of the
                > time. The
                > aquascape is dominated by Java fern growing on cork tubes
                > and
                > half-rounds. There are for species of Cryptocorynes, a red
                > lotus, a
                > liverwort,  Wisteria and pennywort (the latter two
                > growing at the
                > surface in the higher light area). Substrate is black
                > fluorite sand, and
                > filtration is via an Ehiem Professionel 3 Filter (450
                > gph).
                >
                > Frank
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To visit your group on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniQuaria
                >
                >
                > Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do,
                > send a message to:
                > UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com 
                >             Yahoo! Groups
                > Links
                >
                >
                >     UniQuaria-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
                >
                >
                >
              • Frank M. Greco
                And one nice thing about live plants is sometimes they surprise you. I guess I didn t close the glass cover all the way last night, and by this morning one
                Message 9 of 17 , Jan 6, 2012
                • 1 Attachment
                • 62 KB
                And one nice thing about live plants is sometimes they surprise you. I
                guess I didn't close the glass cover all the way last night, and by this
                morning one stem of my Wisteria plant decided to make a break for it.

                Frank
              • nonstopmom888
                Wow, it looks like it becomes a little tree :) Your aquarium in the other picture looks amazing too! Thanks, Nora
                Message 10 of 17 , Jan 8, 2012
                • 0 Attachment
                  Wow, it looks like it becomes a little tree :)

                  Your aquarium in the other picture looks amazing too!
                  Thanks, Nora


                  --- In UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com, "Frank M. Greco" <phrankg@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > And one nice thing about live plants is sometimes they surprise you. I
                  > guess I didn't close the glass cover all the way last night, and by this
                  > morning one stem of my Wisteria plant decided to make a break for it.
                  >
                  > Frank
                  >
                • Jimmie R Davis
                  I use shoplight fluorescent fixtures. I prefer the stainless steel look. I get the 4 ft. double tube fixture for my 55 gallon. It just fits. I do keep a
                  Message 11 of 17 , Jan 18, 2012
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I use shoplight fluorescent fixtures.  I prefer the stainless steel look.  I get the 4 ft. double tube fixture for my 55 gallon.  It just fits.  I do keep a glass under it to help prevent rust. I buy plant type bulbs. As early as the first fluorescent  fixtures I preferred the plant bulbs.  Tells you how old I am.
                                                                                                                        Nadine


                     At 04:29 AM 1/6/2012, you wrote:
                     

                    Hi Frank,

                    The reason I asked about your lighting? Not much room in our house for a much bigger tank
                    other than what I have now, which is a standard 29-gallon. I would like a 65 at 36 x 18 x 24, which would fit in the space we have available.

                    I have zero experience with live plants but have been in the hobby for a long time. Back in the 70’s I was spawning and raising Discus. Being retired now but as with most people, not independently wealthily, my thoughts are about the depth of this tank, at 24”. It has been suggested that I use a “Quad” system with 2-10,000 k tubes and 2-6,500 tubes. As you know these are not cheap.

                    Others tell me this is over kill and a single double tube fixture at half the cost, with these tubes will work just fine. Not sure of the depth of your 220 but certainly a tank this size would pose the same type of problems. I really would not like to fail in my “first planted tank” attempt. My needs for plants are very simple as to type, anything green! I’d like your thoughts or suggestions on this sets-up.

                    Thanks again for the return,

                    bill in pa

                    --- On Thu, 1/5/12, Frank M. Greco <phrankg@... > wrote:

                    > From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@... >
                    > Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions
                    > To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012, 10:21 PM
                    > On 1/4/2012 8:43 PM, bill 1433
                    > wrote:
                    > > Great looking tanks Frank but what size
                    > > are they?  What lighting is used?
                    > It's only one tank: a 220 gallon. It's lit by a 12 bulb T5
                    > fluorescent
                    > fixture, although I use only half the bulbs most of the
                    > time. The
                    > aquascape is dominated by Java fern growing on cork tubes
                    > and
                    > half-rounds. There are for species of Cryptocorynes, a red
                    > lotus, a
                    > liverwort,  Wisteria and pennywort (the latter two
                    > growing at the
                    > surface in the higher light area). Substrate is black
                    > fluorite sand, and
                    > filtration is via an Ehiem Professionel 3 Filter (450
                    > gph).
                    >
                    > Frank
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > To visit your group on the web, go to: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniQuaria
                    >
                    >
                    > Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do,
                    > send a message to:
                    > UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.comÂ
                    >             Yahoo! Groups
                    > Links
                    >
                    >
                    >     UniQuaria-fullfeatured@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • Julie Haddy
                    ... Deep tanks are more of a challenge on lighting to be successful as planted tanks. I would definitely use a plant friendly substrate regardless of the
                    Message 12 of 17 , Jan 18, 2012
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I would like a 65 at 36 x 18 x 24, which would fit in the space we have available.


                      I have zero experience with live plants but have been in the hobby for a long time. Back in the 70’s I was spawning and raising Discus. Being retired now but as with most people, not independently wealthily, my thoughts are about the depth of this tank, at 24”. It has been suggested that I use a “Quad” system with 2-10,000 k tubes and 2-6,500 tubes. As you know these are not cheap.

                      Others tell me this is over kill and a single double tube fixture at half the cost, with these tubes will work just fine. Not sure of the depth of your 220 but certainly a tank this size would pose the same type of problems. I really would not like to fail in my “first planted tank” attempt. My needs for plants are very simple as to type, anything green! I’d like your thoughts or suggestions on this sets-up.

                      Deep tanks are more of a challenge on lighting to be successful as planted tanks.  I would definitely use a plant friendly substrate regardless of the lighting chosen to help support them as much as possible.  I don't have any tanks as deep as a 65 gal tank, but I would doubt that a quad system would be overkill because of the depth.  It may work better to have a couple of tubes & a couple of "spotlight" type lights such as halogens to help penetrate the depth.  Some low light plants such as Java fern & anubias are very forgiving of low light conditions but to stay green & grow somewhat, I think a dual light over that depth would not really lead to a successful planted tank.  I have not really done much homework on the LED fixtures & how they work on planted tanks, but a friend is retrofitting one of his tanks with LEDs & it's BRIGHT.

                      Decent lights are pricey, but there are ways to mitigate that.  Look for retrofit kits if you don't mind doing a little handiwork to upgrade a regular fixture.  Save a search on ebay or learn to use RSS on Craigslists to search for used items.


                      Julie Haddy

                    • Frank M. Greco
                      ... I would suggest a double bulb 36 T5 HO fluorescent fixture. This will work both on a 29 and a 65, and give you enough light to grow most aquatic plants.
                      Message 13 of 17 , Jan 18, 2012
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                        On 1/18/2012 4:41 PM, Jimmie R Davis wrote:
                        The reason I asked about your lighting? Not much room in our house for a much bigger tank other than what I have now, which is a standard 29-gallon. I would like a 65 at 36 x 18 x 24, which would fit in the space we have available.
                        I would suggest a double bulb 36" T5 HO fluorescent fixture. This will work both on a 29 and a 65, and give you enough light to grow most aquatic plants. My 220 is 36" deep, and the only problem I've had with plants is with the swords. But I think that that is because the other plants, being faster growers, shaded them out, not because the lighting itself was inadequate.

                        These are not inexpensive fixtures, though. You might be able to find a similar type fixture at a lighting store or Home Depot/Lowes for a lower price, and adapt it to your needs.

                        Frank
                      • bill 1433
                        Hi Julie,   Thanks for the return.  I may just start with one twin tube fixture. The tank is 18 wide and should the first not provide enough light, I will
                        Message 14 of 17 , Jan 19, 2012
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                          Hi Julie,
                           
                          Thanks for the return.  I may just start with one twin tube fixture.
                          The tank is 18" wide and should the first not provide enough light,
                          I will add a second.
                           
                          bill in pa

                          --- On Wed, 1/18/12, Julie Haddy <pawslover@...> wrote:

                          From: Julie Haddy <pawslover@...>
                          Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions
                          To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
                          Date: Wednesday, January 18, 2012, 4:53 PM



                          I would like a 65 at 36 x 18 x 24, which would fit in the space we have available.

                          I have zero experience with live plants but have been in the hobby for a long time. Back in the 70’s I was spawning and raising Discus. Being retired now but as with most people, not independently wealthily, my thoughts are about the depth of this tank, at 24”. It has been suggested that I use a “Quad” system with 2-10,000 k tubes and 2-6,500 tubes. As you know these are not cheap.

                          Others tell me this is over kill and a single double tube fixture at half the cost, with these tubes will work just fine. Not sure of the depth of your 220 but certainly a tank this size would pose the same type of problems. I really would not like to fail in my “first planted tank” attempt. My needs for plants are very simple as to type, anything green! I’d like your thoughts or suggestions on this sets-up.
                          Deep tanks are more of a challenge on lighting to be successful as planted tanks.  I would definitely use a plant friendly substrate regardless of the lighting chosen to help support them as much as possible.  I don't have any tanks as deep as a 65 gal tank, but I would doubt that a quad system would be overkill because of the depth.  It may work better to have a couple of tubes & a couple of "spotlight" type lights such as halogens to help penetrate the depth.  Some low light plants such as Java fern & anubias are very forgiving of low light conditions but to stay green & grow somewhat, I think a dual light over that depth would not really lead to a successful planted tank.  I have not really done much homework on the LED fixtures & how they work on planted tanks, but a friend is retrofitting one of his tanks with LEDs & it's BRIGHT.

                          Decent lights are pricey, but there are ways to mitigate that.  Look for retrofit kits if you don't mind doing a little handiwork to upgrade a regular fixture.  Save a search on ebay or learn to use RSS on Craigslists to search for used items.


                          Julie Haddy



                        • donna joanna
                          An older aquarist in Canada used shop lights over tanks.    Using chicken grit (an old time grit that chickens need, I m guessing it had a lot of crushed
                          Message 15 of 17 , Jan 19, 2012
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                            An older aquarist in Canada used shop lights over tanks.    Using chicken grit (an old time grit that chickens need, I'm guessing it had a lot of crushed oyster shell) as substrate, her plants were always big, bold and healthy.    In fact, she was an
                            award winning expert.     I think she used plants-only larger tanks in the 55 gallon size.     FAMA published an article about her many years ago - I hope I'm remembering her simple formula correctly.
                            Her formula probably would not work for so many plants we can buy these days but back then the tougher plants we had available did very well.
                            Donna Joanna, LMD, Kansas, US

                            From: Jimmie R Davis <jimrdavis@...>
                            To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
                            Sent: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 3:41 PM
                            Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions



                            I use shoplight fluorescent fixtures.  I prefer the stainless steel look.  I get the 4 ft. double tube fixture for my 55 gallon.  It just fits.  I do keep a glass under it to help prevent rust. I buy plant type bulbs. As early as the first fluorescent  fixtures I preferred the plant bulbs.  Tells you how old I am.
                                                                                                                                Nadine


                             At 04:29 AM 1/6/2012, you wrote:
                             

                            Hi Frank,

                            The reason I asked about your lighting? Not much room in our house for a much bigger tank
                            other than what I have now, which is a standard 29-gallon. I would like a 65 at 36 x 18 x 24, which would fit in the space we have available.

                            I have zero experience with live plants but have been in the hobby for a long time. Back in the 70’s I was spawning and raising Discus. Being retired now but as with most people, not independently wealthily, my thoughts are about the depth of this tank, at 24�. It has been suggested that I use a “Quad� system with 2-10,000 k tubes and 2-6,500 tubes. As you know these are not cheap.

                            Others tell me this is over kill and a single double tube fixture at half the cost, with these tubes will work just fine. Not sure of the depth of your 220 but certainly a tank this size would pose the same type of problems. I really would not like to fail in my “first planted tank� attempt. My needs for plants are very simple as to type, anything green! I’d like your thoughts or suggestions on this sets-up.

                            Thanks again for the return,

                            bill in pa

                            --- On Thu, 1/5/12, Frank M. Greco <phrankg@... > wrote:

                            > From: Frank M. Greco <phrankg@... >
                            > Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] live plants in 10 G, more fish for community tank... general questions
                            > To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
                            > Date: Thursday, January 5, 2012, 10:21 PM
                            > On 1/4/2012 8:43 PM, bill 1433
                            > wrote:
                            > > Great looking tanks Frank but what size
                            > > are they?  What lighting is used?
                            > It's only one tank: a 220 gallon. It's lit by a 12 bulb T5
                            > fluorescent
                            > fixture, although I use only half the bulbs most of the
                            > time. The
                            > aquascape is dominated by Java fern growing on cork tubes
                            > and
                            > half-rounds. There are for species of Cryptocorynes, a red
                            > lotus, a
                            > liverwort,  Wisteria and pennywort (the latter two
                            > growing at the
                            > surface in the higher light area). Substrate is black
                            > fluorite sand, and
                            > filtration is via an Ehiem Professionel 3 Filter (450
                            > gph).
                            >
                            > Frank
                            >
                            >
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