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Re: [UniQuaria] Re: Rocks

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  • Frank M. Greco
    ... All the more reason not to boil any type of stone. Really, it does nothing more than rinsing in hot water or bleaching them (3 parts water to 1 part
    Message 1 of 12 , May 31, 2008
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      Jaeda wrote:
      > Avoid limestone, unless you want to harden the water and get residual build-up that needs to be cleaned. If you do use limestone, you can boil it, but not for too long. Limestone already has a very high moisture content and from experience I can tell you that when used around a campfire, it can "explode" as the moisture within the stone heats up. I also wouldn't recommended heating any shales without care (like in a pressure cooker without the weight on the valve - pressure cooker because of the heavier design and locking lid) - shale has proven more explosive encircling a campfire than limestone. Woohoo!!!
      >
      All the more reason not to boil any type of stone. Really, it does
      nothing more than rinsing in hot water or bleaching them (3 parts water
      to 1 part household bleach) would do. If you are worried about diseases
      (remembering that rocks are not usually vectors for diseases) or
      bringing in snails (via eggs) or insect larvae (usually harmless), you
      can let the rock dry out completely. This will kill anything living on it.
      > you could probably get away with calcite (marble) as long as it was clean/free of dust from origin.
      >
      I wonder if this would affect water quality? Does anyone here know?
      Calcite is another form of calcium carbonate which does raise pH,
      alkalinity, and hardness.

      Frank
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