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Re: [UniQuaria] Question Re: Corydoras & Aquarium Salt

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  • edward doucette
    Thanks for all the info on Corydoras & Aquarium Salt, I appreciated your little story about fishing and things you said made sense, like the fish spend less
    Message 1 of 18 , Sep 5, 2004
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      Thanks for all the info on Corydoras & Aquarium Salt,
      I appreciated your little story about fishing and things
      you said made sense, like the fish spend less time
      thinking about the water than us - so true.
      I don't have a problem with the water, the Pet Store
      suggested it as a precaution they said and being new
      and reading about Corydoras low tolerance I was cautious.
      Thanks for the tip about Tetra, I'll be able to store that if
      I have a problem. I'm new to this but I don't want to hurt
      my Corydoras and I really appreciate this group and the
      quick response of you and all members. Thanks.
      Nancy

      radzewicz@... wrote:
      I see a lot of discussion on the pros and cons of adding sea salt to
      a freshwater aquarium. I believe that people want to add it because
      of a possible deficiency in some key electrolytes or minerals in the
      local water. 

      Sea salt is mostly sodium, calcium (dietary, not hardness) potassium,
      and trace elements like selemium, gold, and on. But there are other
      things that can provide electrolytes besides sea salt.  Maybe you
      might want to try something else that will add the electrolytes
      without raising sodium levels. I'm a believer in the Tetra blackwater
      tonic, my fish like it (I'm not a Tetra salesman).  I have neons
      spawing in my three week old tank and I credit the BWT. I use about a
      third of the recommended dosage.

      As far as catfish not liking salt in the water, I've heard that also,
      but don't really put to much credence in it. When I was 16 my uncle
      took me fishing in the Louisiana backwaters, where the river meets
      the gulf. Very brackish water. In the very same spot I caught a blue
      claw crab and a big old wiskered catfish.  So I'm of the opinion that
      catfish will go wherever there is a meal for them and they will
      thrive just fine even with a bit of salt in their water.

      I understand that corys also are found in the African cichlid lakes,
      and that's hard, alkaline water.  Opinions vary, obviously, but I
      suspect the catfish spent less time thinking about the water than we
      do.

      Stan
      >
      >    To visit your group on the web, go to:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniQuaria/



      Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

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    • edward doucette
      Thanks for the tip about the salt not evaporating, I had read that before but I forgot, it s nice to have this group for reminders like that, thanks for
      Message 2 of 18 , Sep 5, 2004
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        Thanks for the tip about the salt not evaporating, I had
        read that before but I forgot, it's nice to have this group
        for reminders like that, thanks for responding so fast,
        I haven't decided if I'll put salt in or not, presently I have
        no problem that calls to , but I want to be safe and in the
        know if the need arises.
        Thanks again
        Nancy

        Nimish Mathur <nimmat4@...> wrote:

        Freshwater fish don�t really need salt in the water. However, if your aquarium is a new setup or is having any problems, then salt is the simplest anti-stress you can have in there but for a temporary period. This salt amount can vary from 1 tea spoon per 5 gallons to 1 tablespoon per gallon. I have had corydoras and loaches in the lower concentration of this salt without any problems (1teaspoon per 5 gallons). Also keep in mind that salt does not evaporate from the water to if you are changing the water you need to add only the same amount of salt needed for the amount of water you are changing and not the entire tank.

         

        If you are not having any problem in your tank then there is no reason to put any salt. If some specific fish are to be treated, then can be treated in a salt bath for 2-3 mins or a hospital tank rather then treating the entire main tank.

         

        Nim

         

         


        From: edward doucette [mailto:scamphill2000@...]
        Sent: 05 September 2004 04:46
        To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [UniQuaria] Question Re: Corydoras & Aquarium Salt

         

        I have a question if anyone can give me some advice.

        I have freshwater tanks, a pet store told me it's good

        to add some Aquarium Salt in them, yet I read that

        Corydoras have a low tolerance for Aquarium Salt and

        I have Corydoras in my 4 tanks.

        Does anyone out there know anything about this - was

        I reading something wrong, the Pet Store when I asked

        them just said oh, then you'd best not put salt in. That

        really doesn't help me to know in future though.

        Any help would be appreciated.



        Rachel <rshaw@...> wrote:

        go to http://applesnail.net for everything you need to know....

        btw, you'll need to have hard water and add a calcium supplement if
        you want to raise baby snails, or have the parents live and grow to
        happy and healthy snails.

        without this, their shell will become very thin and brittle (lack of
        calcium). and will eventually crack and holes will form and will get
        larger and larger until the snail dies :(

        rachel



        --- In UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com , "julie_hash" <goddessjules@e...>
        wrote:
        > I am relatively new to the world of aquaria...
        >
        > I got some pond snails from my parents pond. They hve been in the
        > tank for about 2 weeks now, and are laying eggs like crazy. I've
        > already got 5 different egg sacs now...
        >
        > Does anybody know how long it would take for them to hatch?



        Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

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      • edward doucette
        You say your not a biologist but you make lots of sense in a language I can understand Thanks for taking the time to read the questions we put out and answer
        Message 3 of 18 , Sep 5, 2004
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          You say your not a biologist but you make
          lots of sense in a language I can understand
          Thanks for taking the time to read the questions
          we put out and answer them.
          I think I can speak for all when I say that's what
          we need in the group - people to help out when
          the need arises.
          Thanks
          Nancy

          Nimish Mathur <nimmat4@...> wrote:
          Well. some points of correction:
          Salt for freshwater aquarium is not really sea salt. It is aquarium salt but
          even plain simple sodium chloride will do. Table salt is not recommended as
          it might have some anti caking agents that may not be good for fish, hence:
          Aqarium salt.

          Corydoras do not live in Africa or for that matter African lakes. Corys are
          habitants of south America where they get very soft and acidic water which
          is worlds apart from African lakes. The catfish that live in African lakes
          are synodontis catfish. It is a common myth that catfish are sensitive to
          salt in the water. For that matter many other non catfish are sensitive to
          salt in the water. Corydoras and loaches are sensitive to higher
          concentrations of salt but it does not ean they cannot tolerate any salt in
          the water. Every natural water body has a slight amount of salt in it.

          Salt helps fish by creating a osmotic balance between the fish and the water
          to allow better flow of fluids within the fish body and maybe also help
          condition gills. This is apart from it creating an uncomfortable environment
          for many freshwater pathogens. I am not a biologist so maybe I could be
          wrong in this.

          Nim


          >-----Original Message-----
          >From: radzewicz@... [mailto:radzewicz@...]
          >Sent: 05 September 2004 07:35
          >To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [UniQuaria] Question Re: Corydoras & Aquarium Salt
          >
          >I see a lot of discussion on the pros and cons of adding sea salt to
          >a freshwater aquarium. I believe that people want to add it because
          >of a possible deficiency in some key electrolytes or minerals in the
          >local water.
          >
          >Sea salt is mostly sodium, calcium (dietary, not hardness) potassium,
          >and trace elements like selemium, gold, and on. But there are other
          >things that can provide electrolytes besides sea salt.  Maybe you
          >might want to try something else that will add the electrolytes
          >without raising sodium levels. I'm a believer in the Tetra blackwater
          >tonic, my fish like it (I'm not a Tetra salesman).  I have neons
          >spawing in my three week old tank and I credit the BWT. I use about a
          >third of the recommended dosage.
          >
          >As far as catfish not liking salt in the water, I've heard that also,
          >but don't really put to much credence in it. When I was 16 my uncle
          >took me fishing in the Louisiana backwaters, where the river meets
          >the gulf. Very brackish water. In the very same spot I caught a blue
          >claw crab and a big old wiskered catfish.  So I'm of the opinion that
          >catfish will go wherever there is a meal for them and they will
          >thrive just fine even with a bit of salt in their water.
          >
          >I understand that corys also are found in the African cichlid lakes,
          >and that's hard, alkaline water.  Opinions vary, obviously, but I
          >suspect the catfish spent less time thinking about the water than we
          >do.
          >
          >Stan
          >>
          >>    To visit your group on the web, go to:
          >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniQuaria/
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for
          >www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly
          >qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed
          >your expectations. Please visit their website at
          >www.highaspirationsinc.com.
          >
          >Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do, send a message to:
          >UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >



          Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

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        • radzewicz@yahoo.com
          thanks for the info about the African lake corys . I knew they look an awful lot like corys. But they are still catfish no matter what. As for the great salt
          Message 4 of 18 , Sep 5, 2004
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            thanks for the info about the African lake "corys". I knew they look
            an awful lot like corys. But they are still catfish no matter what.

            As for the great salt debate, table salt or table-like salt, ie
            sodium cloride, it is probably the one salt that you don't want to
            add to anything, food or aquarium. Since it is only sodium salt it
            only adds sodium to the tank and sodium is the one ion that is almost
            never necessary to add. Since you know about the osmotic process then
            you proabably are aware that it is sodium that is normally being
            pumped out at the cellular level. Sea salt offers all mineral
            elements, such as dietary calcium, potasium, chromium, phosphorus,
            etc along with sodium and thus may actually be of some value in the
            aquarium. You won't find the same broad ionic spectrum including
            trace minerals in ordinary table salt.

            Stan



            --- In UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com, "Nimish Mathur" <nimmat4@y...>
            wrote:
            > Well. some points of correction:
            > Salt for freshwater aquarium is not really sea salt. It is aquarium
            salt but
            > even plain simple sodium chloride will do. Table salt is not
            recommended as
            > it might have some anti caking agents that may not be good for
            fish, hence:
            > Aqarium salt.
            >
            > Corydoras do not live in Africa or for that matter African lakes.
            Corys are
            > habitants of south America where they get very soft and acidic
            water which
            > is worlds apart from African lakes. The catfish that live in
            African lakes
            > are synodontis catfish. It is a common myth that catfish are
            sensitive to
            > salt in the water. For that matter many other non catfish are
            sensitive to
            > salt in the water. Corydoras and loaches are sensitive to higher
            > concentrations of salt but it does not ean they cannot tolerate any
            salt in
            > the water. Every natural water body has a slight amount of salt in
            it.
            >
            > Salt helps fish by creating a osmotic balance between the fish and
            the water
            > to allow better flow of fluids within the fish body and maybe also
            help
            > condition gills. This is apart from it creating an uncomfortable
            environment
            > for many freshwater pathogens. I am not a biologist so maybe I
            could be
            > wrong in this.
            >
            > Nim
            >
            >
            > >-----Original Message-----
            > >From: radzewicz@y... [mailto:radzewicz@y...]
            > >Sent: 05 September 2004 07:35
            > >To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
            > >Subject: [UniQuaria] Question Re: Corydoras & Aquarium Salt
            > >
            > >I see a lot of discussion on the pros and cons of adding sea salt
            to
            > >a freshwater aquarium. I believe that people want to add it because
            > >of a possible deficiency in some key electrolytes or minerals in
            the
            > >local water.
            > >
            > >Sea salt is mostly sodium, calcium (dietary, not hardness)
            potassium,
            > >and trace elements like selemium, gold, and on. But there are other
            > >things that can provide electrolytes besides sea salt. Maybe you
            > >might want to try something else that will add the electrolytes
            > >without raising sodium levels. I'm a believer in the Tetra
            blackwater
            > >tonic, my fish like it (I'm not a Tetra salesman). I have neons
            > >spawing in my three week old tank and I credit the BWT. I use
            about a
            > >third of the recommended dosage.
            > >
            > >As far as catfish not liking salt in the water, I've heard that
            also,
            > >but don't really put to much credence in it. When I was 16 my uncle
            > >took me fishing in the Louisiana backwaters, where the river meets
            > >the gulf. Very brackish water. In the very same spot I caught a
            blue
            > >claw crab and a big old wiskered catfish. So I'm of the opinion
            that
            > >catfish will go wherever there is a meal for them and they will
            > >thrive just fine even with a bit of salt in their water.
            > >
            > >I understand that corys also are found in the African cichlid
            lakes,
            > >and that's hard, alkaline water. Opinions vary, obviously, but I
            > >suspect the catfish spent less time thinking about the water than
            we
            > >do.
            > >
            > >Stan
            > >>
            > >> To visit your group on the web, go to:
            > >> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/UniQuaria/
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for
            > >www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This
            highly
            > >qualified group can do anything and everything to make your
            website exceed
            > >your expectations. Please visit their website at
            > >www.highaspirationsinc.com.
            > >
            > >Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do, send a
            message to:
            > >UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
          • Richard Bunn
            I ve noticed a few posts lately relating to salt intolerance which is quite true. I know of a few fish that are salt intolerant but I was wondering if anyone
            Message 5 of 18 , Sep 5, 2004
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              I've noticed a few posts lately relating to salt intolerance which is quite true.  I know of a few fish that are salt intolerant but I was wondering if anyone has come across a fairly decent list of species so that more people can be sure that they're not doing any harm before they start going mad with the salt to treat Ich etc.  Can anyone help out here? If we can get a list together I think it should be posted up in the files section of the group (GIANCARLO ;-)  )
               
              Regards
              Richard
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 4:45 AM
              Subject: [UniQuaria] Question Re: Corydoras & Aquarium Salt

              I have a question if anyone can give me some advice.
              I have freshwater tanks, a pet store told me it's good
              to add some Aquarium Salt in them, yet I read that
              Corydoras have a low tolerance for Aquarium Salt and
              I have Corydoras in my 4 tanks.
              Does anyone out there know anything about this - was
              I reading something wrong, the Pet Store when I asked
              them just said oh, then you'd best not put salt in. That
              really doesn't help me to know in future though.
              Any help would be appreciated.


              Rachel <rshaw@...> wrote:
              go to http://applesnail.net for everything you need to know....

              btw, you'll need to have hard water and add a calcium supplement if
              you want to raise baby snails, or have the parents live and grow to
              happy and healthy snails.

              without this, their shell will become very thin and brittle (lack of
              calcium). and will eventually crack and holes will form and will get
              larger and larger until the snail dies :(

              rachel



              --- In UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com, "julie_hash" <goddessjules@e...>
              wrote:
              > I am relatively new to the world of aquaria...
              >
              > I got some pond snails from my parents pond. They hve been in the
              > tank for about 2 weeks now, and are laying eggs like crazy. I've
              > already got 5 different egg sacs now...
              >
              > Does anybody know how long it would take for them to hatch?



              Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

              Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do, send a message to:
              UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com             





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              Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

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            • Frank M. Greco
              Message 6 of 18 , Sep 6, 2004
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                <<I've noticed a few posts lately relating to salt intolerance which is
                quite true. I know of a few fish that are salt intolerant>>

                Interesting. Can you list some of those species for me?

                I can not think of a single tropical fish that is salt intolerant at the one
                teaspoon per gallon dose (about 2.4 ppt salinity). Catfish, including
                Corydoras and Synodontis, will tolerate up to 3 ppt salinity without a
                problem (IME, higher than this and they begin to stress). Even discus and
                neons will tolerate 2 ppt to 3 ppt without incidence. We use salt at 2 ppt
                (in the form of diluted seawater) in our freshwater quarantine area, and
                have not had a problem due to its use.

                My belief is that the whole salt intolerance myth came about simply because
                of the "if a little is good a lot is better" mentality (the same reason the
                malachite green myth came about, no doubt). Yes, there is a limit to how
                much salt (table salt, marine salt, evaporated seawater or real seawater) a
                freshwater fish can take, but the dose normally used by hobbyists is well
                within the safe zone. As a long term bath, as we would generally find in an
                aquarium situation, a dose ranging from 2,000 ppm to 4,000 ppm is advised.
                Dosing at the standard 1 teaspoon/gallon, we get a dose of ~2,368 ppm for a
                LEVEL teaspoon or ~3,684 ppm for a HEAPING teaspoon (providing my math is
                correct). This is well within the long term therapeutic range, and is
                considered safe of all tropical and cool-water fish.

                << but I was wondering if anyone has come across a fairly decent list of
                species so that more people can be sure that they're not doing any harm
                before they start going mad with the salt to treat Ich etc.>>

                I'd like to see such a list myself, but I am doubtful that it exists. It's
                more a matter of dose than anything else.

                Frank M. Greco (phrankg@...)
                Visit http://www.franksaquarium.com
                The Freshwater Crustacean Farm
              • harry perry
                A while back you posted a message about ordering from overseas. I assume you have an importers license. What is involved in getting a license. Please share.
                Message 7 of 18 , Sep 6, 2004
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                  A while back you posted a message about ordering from overseas. I assume you have an importers license. What is involved in getting a license. Please share.
                   
                  Harry

                  "Frank M. Greco" <phrankg@...> wrote:
                  <<I've noticed a few posts lately relating to salt intolerance which is
                  quite true.  I know of a few fish that are salt intolerant>>

                  Interesting. Can you list some of those species for me?

                  I can not think of a single tropical fish that is salt intolerant at the one
                  teaspoon per gallon dose (about 2.4 ppt salinity). Catfish, including
                  Corydoras and Synodontis, will tolerate up to 3 ppt salinity without a
                  problem (IME, higher than this and they begin to stress). Even discus and
                  neons will tolerate 2 ppt to 3 ppt without incidence. We use salt at 2 ppt
                  (in the form of diluted seawater) in our freshwater quarantine area, and
                  have not had a problem due to its use.

                  My belief is that the whole salt intolerance myth came about simply because
                  of the "if a little is good a lot is better" mentality (the same reason the
                  malachite green myth came about, no doubt). Yes, there is a limit to how
                  much salt (table salt, marine salt, evaporated seawater or real seawater) a
                  freshwater fish can take, but the dose normally used by hobbyists is well
                  within the safe zone. As a long term bath, as we would generally find in an
                  aquarium situation, a dose ranging from 2,000 ppm to 4,000 ppm is advised.
                  Dosing at the standard 1 teaspoon/gallon, we get a dose of ~2,368 ppm for a
                  LEVEL teaspoon or ~3,684 ppm for a HEAPING teaspoon (providing my math is
                  correct). This is well within the long term therapeutic range, and is
                  considered safe of all tropical and cool-water fish.

                  << but I was wondering if anyone has come across a fairly decent list of
                  species so that more people can be sure that they're not doing any harm
                  before they start going mad with the salt to treat Ich etc.>>

                  I'd like to see such a list myself, but I am doubtful that it exists. It's
                  more a matter of dose than anything else.

                  Frank M. Greco (phrankg@...)
                  Visit http://www.franksaquarium.com
                  The Freshwater Crustacean Farm






                  Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

                  Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do, send a message to:
                  UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com             



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                • Frank M. Greco
                  Harry, you need to download the form to request an import/export permit. Go to http://forms.fws.gov/3-200-3.pdf for the form. You will need to fill it out and
                  Message 8 of 18 , Sep 6, 2004
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                    Harry, you need to download the form to request an import/export permit. Go
                    to http://forms.fws.gov/3-200-3.pdf for the form. You will need to fill it
                    out and send them a check for $50 (it might be more now). Once you get the
                    import/export form, and you want to import, you'll need to fill out a 3-177
                    form, plus Customs forms for each shipment you bring in. Each shipment is
                    usually subject to a $55 inspection fee, plus whatever fees Customs charges.

                    Frank M. Greco (phrankg@...)
                    Visit http://www.franksaquarium.com
                    The Freshwater Crustacean Farm
                  • harry perry
                    Thank you very much. Harry Frank M. Greco wrote: Harry, you need to download the form to request an import/export permit. Go to
                    Message 9 of 18 , Sep 6, 2004
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Thank you very much.
                       
                      Harry

                      "Frank M. Greco" <phrankg@...> wrote:
                      Harry, you need to download the form to request an import/export permit. Go
                      to http://forms.fws.gov/3-200-3.pdf for the form. You will need to fill it
                      out and send them a check for $50 (it might be more now). Once you get the
                      import/export form, and you want to import, you'll need to fill out a 3-177
                      form, plus Customs forms for each shipment you bring in. Each shipment is
                      usually subject to a $55 inspection fee, plus whatever fees Customs charges.

                      Frank M. Greco (phrankg@...)
                      Visit http://www.franksaquarium.com
                      The Freshwater Crustacean Farm




                      Need help with your website? Go to the individuals we went to for www.UniQuaria.com, the expert team at High Aspirations, Inc. This highly qualified group can do anything and everything to make your website exceed your expectations. Please visit their website at www.highaspirationsinc.com.

                      Wish to Unsubscribe? I can't imagine why but if you do, send a message to:
                      UniQuaria-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com             




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                      Yahoo! Mail Address AutoComplete - You start. We finish.

                    • harry perry
                      Once the import/export permits are in order I suspect I go to the airport to pick up my shipment is that correct? Harry Frank M. Greco
                      Message 10 of 18 , Sep 6, 2004
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                        Once the import/export permits are in order I suspect I go to the airport to pick up my shipment is that correct?
                         
                        Harry

                        "Frank M. Greco" <phrankg@...> wrote:
                        <<I've noticed a few posts lately relating to salt intolerance which is
                        quite true.  I know of a few fish that are salt intolerant>>

                        Interesting. Can you list some of those species for me?

                        I can not think of a single tropical fish that is salt intolerant at the one
                        teaspoon per gallon dose (about 2.4 ppt salinity). Catfish, including
                        Corydoras and Synodontis, will tolerate up to 3 ppt salinity without a
                        problem (IME, higher than this and they begin to stress). Even discus and
                        neons will tolerate 2 ppt to 3 ppt without incidence. We use salt at 2 ppt
                        (in the form of diluted seawater) in our freshwater quarantine area, and
                        have not had a problem due to its use.

                        My belief is that the whole salt intolerance myth came about simply because
                        of the "if a little is good a lot is better" mentality (the same reason the
                        malachite green myth came about, no doubt). Yes, there is a limit to how
                        much salt (table salt, marine salt, evaporated seawater or real seawater) a
                        freshwater fish can take, but the dose normally used by hobbyists is well
                        within the safe zone. As a long term bath, as we would generally find in an
                        aquarium situation, a dose ranging from 2,000 ppm to 4,000 ppm is advised.
                        Dosing at the standard 1 teaspoon/gallon, we get a dose of ~2,368 ppm for a
                        LEVEL teaspoon or ~3,684 ppm for a HEAPING teaspoon (providing my math is
                        correct). This is well within the long term therapeutic range, and is
                        considered safe of all tropical and cool-water fish.

                        << but I was wondering if anyone has come across a fairly decent list of
                        species so that more people can be sure that they're not doing any harm
                        before they start going mad with the salt to treat Ich etc.>>

                        I'd like to see such a list myself, but I am doubtful that it exists. It's
                        more a matter of dose than anything else.

                        Frank M. Greco (phrankg@...)
                        Visit http://www.franksaquarium.com
                        The Freshwater Crustacean Farm






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                      • Frank M. Greco
                        It s a bit more complicated than that. 24
                        Message 11 of 18 , Sep 7, 2004
                        • 0 Attachment
                          <<Once the import/export permits are in order I suspect I go to the airport
                          to pick up my shipment is that correct?>>

                          It's a bit more complicated than that. 24 hours before your shipment is to
                          arrive, you should notify the USFWS. Provide them with a copy of the air
                          waybill and a pro forma invoice. Let them know the airline on which the
                          shipment is arriving, and the approximate time of arrival. On the day the
                          shipment is to arrive, you'll call the USFWS once the flight has landed.
                          This way, they have a time frame of when to come down and inspect the
                          shipment. You MUST have, in triplicate, your 3-177 form, Customs forms, and
                          invoice (the air waybill already has three parts so no need to dupe them).
                          Once the shipment is available, USFWS will inspect it and either pass it or
                          confiscate it. If it's passed, head over to Customs. Give them all the
                          paperwork, and wait for them to stamp it. You may need to pay duty on the
                          shipment. They should then clear it. Only then can you pick up it up from
                          the airline.
                          What are you looking to bring in? Is this for you personally or for resale?
                          If it's a small shipment, contact USFWS in your area and see if they will
                          exempt you for all or part of the whole process. you will probably still
                          need to go through Customs, but you should check with them and see if
                          they'll waive everything.

                          Frank M. Greco (phrankg@...)
                          Visit http://www.franksaquarium.com
                          The Freshwater Crustacean Farm
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